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Need help troubleshooting Boot Loop (4/5 times) on cold startup


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#1 Wazzagle

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 11:39 AM

I built the computer outlined below around two and a half years ago. It was my first ever build and things went incredibly smoothly. Last year, I overclocked the CPU to 4.5, and that also went smoothly.

 

However, over the past few months, whenever I've booted my computer up from cold, such as in the morning after being shut down for 10 hours or so, a fairly loud whirring sound could be heard that gradually faded away after a short time. I thought that this was a loose fan bearing or something, as I could quicken the process of making it silent with a few gentle knocks/rattles of the computer (naughty, I know).

 

CPU: Intel - Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler  ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-Z97X-Gaming 5 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard
Memory: Kingston - HyperX Fury Red 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory  ($68.99 @ B&H)
Storage: SanDisk - Solid State Drive 128GB 2.5" Solid State Drive  ($128.59 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive  ($32.00 @ Newegg Marketplace)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive  ($32.00 @ Newegg Marketplace)
Video Card: MSI - GeForce GTX 970 4GB Twin Frozr V Video Card
Case: NZXT - H440 (Matte Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case  ($104.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: Corsair - CX 600W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply  ($109.88 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 8.1 Pro OEM 64-bit  ($79.98 @ My Choice Software)
Monitor: Asus - VG248QE 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor  ($246.99 @ SuperBiiz)
 

But the problem has changed this week.

 

I've now encountered a bootloop that starts when the computer has been switched off for many hours. It will attempt to boot up 4/5 times in quick succession (in 3 second intervals or so) followed by one solitary beep. The computer then turns on fine and I have zero problems throughout the day.

 

I haven't tried solving the problem as of yet as I don't have any spare parts lying around that I could swap. I therefore hoped somebody could help before I have to purchase new pieces of hardware.

 

Could it be faulty RAM after all this time? Is RAM known to fail after this length of time?

Could I have loosened a cable in trying to make the loud whirring sound disappear?

Is it a known power supply problem?

My operating system runs off the SSD, but could a problem with the mechanical drives be causing the problem?

 

I am thinking of removing one stick of RAM and seeing if that's the problem. However, as the problem only shows its ugly head when booted up from cold, I can only remove hardware and test every morning.

I'm also considering reverting my overclock back to factory settings. Does this sound viable even though it's been stable for over a year?

 

If anyone could help I'd be extremely grateful. I'd rather try and pinpoint the cause before rushing out and purchasing a ton of new hardware.

 

Thanks!

 

 

 



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#2 mjd420nova

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 07:39 PM

This does sound like the classic OC blues.  Although it may have run fine when running above spec. , It may have done damage to other components on the MOBO that weren't meant to be OC'd.  They often get elevated temperatures that leads to a thermal breakdown and it only wants to run properly when it gets warmed up.  A little application of freeze spray on the MOBO could pinpoint the device.  OR the CPU couldn't take it and has failed.



#3 Wazzagle

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 04:38 AM

This does sound like the classic OC blues.  Although it may have run fine when running above spec. , It may have done damage to other components on the MOBO that weren't meant to be OC'd.  They often get elevated temperatures that leads to a thermal breakdown and it only wants to run properly when it gets warmed up.  A little application of freeze spray on the MOBO could pinpoint the device.  OR the CPU couldn't take it and has failed.

 

Thanks for the reply.

 

I reverted the overclock (optimzed defaults) last night ready for a test this morning, and It 'bootlooped' twice before starting. The problem persists.

 

What do you think that loud whirring noise is at startup? It seems to be coming from the front of my computer, home to three fans and the two mechanical hard drives. It sounds a bit too loud for a hard drive (like an airplane taking off), especially as it dissipates not long after reaching windows desktop. Could a bad fan stop boot?

 

I'm just trying to look at cheaper options to test, before shelling out on the larger pieces of hardware. Thanks!


Edited by Wazzagle, 30 October 2017 - 04:39 AM.


#4 jonuk76

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 05:32 AM

The noise could be originating at a fan, or disk drive and being amplified by some part of the case.  Unfortunately, they can be difficult to track down.

 

The boot loop could have any number of causes. It sounds (At a guess!) like it's having difficulty initialising a piece of hardware.  I have a similar motherboard to you (the Gaming-3 version though), and used to have issues very similar to you describe.  Usually 2-3 "resets" at the splash screen before it would boot up. I believe what solved my issue was replacing a faulty SATA DVD_RW drive.

 

I think I would start with removing any unneeded peripherals from USB ports, especially any storage devices, and seeing if that improved things.

Then move on to reseating all internal cards, RAM, double checking all SATA cables are in securely.

If that didn't work then perhaps more major checks like stripping down to minimal components (removing video card and all drives) and seeing if the problem still occurred.


Edited by jonuk76, 30 October 2017 - 05:33 AM.

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#5 mightywiz

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Posted 02 November 2017 - 01:29 PM

it could also be about a bad power supply,  capacitor that are going bad will take a few times turning the power supply on and off for the caps to get to the right voltage before it will boot.



#6 Joe C

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 08:25 AM

How old is that Corsair CX power supply? As of this rating guide (2015) those CX power supplies have been rated down from tier 3 to a tier 4 rating, mostly because of the cheap capacitors CWT (manufacture) uses.

 

Tier Four

Built down to a low price. Not exactly the most stable units ever created. Very basic safety circuitry or even thin gauge wiring used. Not for gaming rigs or overclocking systems of any kind. Avoid unless your budget dictates your choice.

The Corsair CX series is an o.k. power supply but not one for the long run... think economy power supply. Try a better newer psu (Seasonic brand) and see if that makes any difference, if it does, keep it. If not.. return it.

 

Recent but still not totally up to date ratings from Toms Hardware

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2547993/psu-tier-list.html


Edited by Joe C, 03 November 2017 - 08:30 AM.


#7 dc3

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 11:37 AM

If you are going to suggest that the problem is with the PSU you need to explain to the OP how to test these voltages.  You need to use either a PSU tester which can be purchased for as little as $6.00 US dollars, or use a Voltmeter with a DC scale.  The most accurate way to test the PSU rail voltages would be to use the Voltmeter.

 

There are three + (positive) voltages, +12VDC (yellow insulation), +5VDC (Red insulation), +3.3VDC (Orange insulation).

 

If you are using a PSU tester most of these will show either Pass or Fail results.  The more expensive testers can show the actual voltages.

 

If you are using a voltage meter readings should not have variances larger than +/- five percent.  

Maximum.........Minimum
12.6V.................11.4V
5.25V.................4.75V
3.47V.................3.14V

 

As for the noise at startup.  I'm inclined to agree that this may just be the system fan.  I've had my own computer's system fan run very fast when the computer is first started but will slow to a normal speed in a few seconds.  Sometimes the BIOS doesn't regulate the fan speed when the computer begins to start for any of a number of reasons.


Edited by dc3, 04 November 2017 - 11:42 AM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#8 Joe C

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 09:24 PM

I was suspecting a poor "power good signal" from the circuit in the power supply

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_good_signal

 

A better psu tester might catch that,  This one will give you the PG signal in milliseconds

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIABG95502625&cm_re=power_supply_tester-_-9SIABG95502625-_-Product

 

Testing the voltages might not tell you anything about the power good signal






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