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My Dell XPS using too much Ram?


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#1 mystic12

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 08:31 AM

Intel core i5, 64bit, 8gb Ram. 1tb hdd

 

Hey guys, since a few weeks now a lot of the times my pc hangs after a period of inactivity and each time I have to power restart. Also when it hangs I can't even get task manager to open.

 

I have been monitoring the Processes in TM for a day or so and what I have been noticing I think is it's Firefox that's causing the spike in Ram usage, I have been monitoring Ram usage on another screen. With FF open with 25 tabs but idle ram shows around 50% but when working continuously for a while it goes up all the way to 95% with FF being the only item showing in orange color as in this pic

 

https://s1.postimg.org/1ie6lmtoi7/ff3.jpg

 

With only 6 tabs or so it's averaging around 62% but the more I am doing on the net that number will increase. Is this normal behavior please?



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 09:01 AM

It's perfectly normal for the amount of memory used by Firefox to increase as the number of tabs increase (and this is true for other web browsers, too).  That being said, 95% usage of 8GB of RAM with fewer that 10 tabs open suggests an issue with one of those websites that you have open in one of those tabs.

 

The attached snapshot is from my machine running Firefox, Chrome, and Edge and where I have over 60 tabs open in Firefox and about 30 tabs open in Chrome, with 5 open in Edge.

 

You need to strategically eliminate one tab at a time when this occurs and you are almost certain to find a specific website that is the culprit in this runaway memory use.

 

Attached File  TaskMgr.jpg   112.59KB   0 downloads

 

 


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 mystic12

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 09:20 AM

The attached snapshot is from my machine running Firefox, Chrome, and Edge and where I have over 60 tabs open in Firefox and about 30 tabs open in Chrome, with 5 open in Edge.

 

You need to strategically eliminate one tab at a time when this occurs and you are almost certain to find a specific website that is the culprit in this runaway memory use.

Wow, I thought I was using a lot of tabs. So by showing the orange color for FF that means definitely it is a browser issue, is this right?



#4 britechguy

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 09:30 AM

The colors are mostly about allowing you to identify which processes/programs are using the most memory.  You see in my snapshot that Chrome is in orange (though I think one step lighter than the orange used on yours).  

 

Given that Firefox on your machine, based on your reports of having less than 10 tabs open, is using just short of 6GB of your 8GB of RAM there certainly is a problem there.  But, again, it may not be a problem with Firefox, per se.  All you need is a bad piece of code on a website that has a memory leak that just keeps racking up memory use over time and you'll eventually get to the tipping point.   There is a reason I suggested to you that when this happens you should close one tab at a time, keeping careful track of exactly what pages you've closed the tabs for.  You will likely eventually find that a specific page is what is causing the problem.  Then I would avoid that page entirely if it is not something essential to what I'm doing or close it promptly after doing whatever I need it for so that it does not become a memory hog.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 mystic12

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 10:18 AM

I will monitor the log and every page actions for a while and get back to this topic, appreciate the help!



#6 mystic12

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 05:58 PM

BTW, do you have the same issue of pc being very slow after a period of inactivity? I would like to find out what's causing that.


Edited by mystic12, 26 October 2017 - 05:58 PM.


#7 britechguy

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Posted 26 October 2017 - 06:20 PM

No.  Any PC that has 95% of its RAM allocated to an application process (Firefox, in this case) is going to slow to a crawl.   There's no memory space for virtually anything else.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#8 mystic12

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 06:04 AM

I am not understanding why the 95% is going "only" to FF, I was thinking the 95% showing is a total of every application but with FF using the most ram, is that not the case?

 

Also, whenever the pc is idle, not understanding why there would be so much ram usage that I would need to hard shut down?



#9 britechguy

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 09:18 AM

You are correct in that I misspoke about Firefox alone using 95%, it is using roughly 75% (6 GB of 8 GB) which is insane for a single process.  But at 95% usage there is simply not enough free RAM for the operating system to behave normally.  It needs some "breathing room" in RAM to do what it does and all the metaphorical oxygen has been sucked out, and clearly by Firefox in your specific case.

 

I don't know what you mean by "when the PC is idle."   Idle means doing nothing and even if you don't have focus on a program that's running that doesn't mean the program is "doing nothing."   Once a program has memory allocated, if it needs it just to "keep afloat," it will keep that memory.  You will often see some variation, but not huge variation, in what a running program has allocated to itself if it's a memory intensive process.  As you can see from the Task Manager screenshot from my own computer web browsers are, without question, very memory intensive processes even if everything is working normally (and in your case something is wrong).

 

I doubt very much that when you fire up the machine and look at your RAM usage when you have not opened a single program, or even if you've opened many programs besides Firefox with the pages you've been using [and possibly including Firefox, just not with the pages you've been using] that you will see 95% memory usage.

 

Something is running away in Firefox based on the data you have offered so far.


Edited by britechguy, 27 October 2017 - 09:19 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#10 mystic12

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 09:34 AM

You are correct in that I misspoke about Firefox alone using 95%, it is using roughly 75% (6 GB of 8 GB) which is insane for a single process.

 

I don't know what you mean by "when the PC is idle." 

 

Something is running away in Firefox based on the data you have offered so far.

I am not understanding how you are coming up with that number FF using roughly 75%? FF is right now showing in orange color 4,341MB, how do you use that to measure Ram % usage?

 

PC being idle for me is when I am away from the pc with no softwares running with only FF open.

 

I too can't believe that FF or any browser should be using that much ram especially when I am not surfing the net.



#11 britechguy

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 09:45 AM

All I have to go on is the screen shot you posted back at the beginning of this thread at that moment in time.  Go back and look at your own previously posted screen shot.

 

If you've since closed a number of tabs and/or restarted the machine and Firefox now has different tabs open of course the amount of memory it uses will be different.

 

I cannot psychically travel through cyberspace to know what task manager is showing on your computer at this moment in time, or any moment in time, other than what there exists a screen shot for.  I don't even know what my own machine is using resources wise unless I have Task Manager or a third-party equivalent open.

 

A PC running Firefox is not "idle" in any meaningful sense of the word.   It's running Firefox, that's not idle.  Idle is when the OS, and nothing but the OS (and, possibly, antivirus and other background processes essential to safety) are running.   As soon as you have an application program running, whether you have focus on it or not, the system is anything but idle.

 

If your machine is consistently being brought to a crawl, and your memory usage is above 90% during those times, the culprit or culprits as far as what's eating up far more memory than it should will become really obvious when you look at Task Manager.   Here's a screen shot of my Task Manager from a few seconds ago, right now Firefox is using between 998 MB up to a bit above 1 GB or so of memory as I watch Task Manager for a few seconds.  This sort of fluctuation is perfectly normal as the browser needs a bit more memory and then doesn't need it anymore.  I do not have focus on Firefox at the moment nor did I during any of the time period I was watching Task Manager.  Firefox is working whether I'm looking at it or not (as is Chrome, Edge, and pretty much any process on the system).

 

Attached File  TaskMgr.jpg   111.08KB   0 downloads

 


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#12 mystic12

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 10:08 AM

I am always looking at the TM, I am not sure if you are understanding my main question which again is, how can I use the MB info showing for FF which is averaging around 4,341 and know what % that is of the 95% showing? I am not good with math just trying to figure out the basic things.


Edited by mystic12, 27 October 2017 - 10:09 AM.


#13 britechguy

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 11:01 AM

The easiest thing is not to worry about what percentage of the 95% showing, but what percentage of your 8 GB [100%] of your RAM.

 

I do not try to do this exactly, though I could, as exactitude is not really relevant here.  For all practical intents and purposes you can move your decimal point to where the comma is placed for a value expressed in MB if you want to know how many GB it is.  In the case of 4,341 MB that's about 4.3 GB.  So, in that case, the process that has that allocated is roughly using a bit more than 50% of your total RAM.

 

When Task Manager is showing 95% total memory usage you'd might as well be thinking of that as 100% anyway.  Something (or some things) is eating up the vast bulk of your system's RAM and there's just not enough space left over for the OS to have what it would normally need to do what it would normally do.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#14 mystic12

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 11:51 AM

When Task Manager is showing 95% total memory usage you'd might as well be thinking of that as 100% anyway.  Something (or some things) is eating up the vast bulk of your system's RAM and there's just not enough space left over for the OS to have what it would normally need to do what it would normally do.

Thx. How do I find out what's eating up the ram? BTW on my win 7 machine FF is showing only 2.4 gb of usage


Edited by mystic12, 27 October 2017 - 12:01 PM.


#15 britechguy

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 12:38 PM

If you click on the column for any one of the measurements shown by Task Manager then the entire display will be sorted on that column either descending (as shown in my screenshot, which is what you'll want and is the default) or ascending order (if you click on it again, it's a toggle for whether ascending or descending sort on that column is used).

 

When Memory is sorted descending the hogs are right there at the top.

 

Attached File  TaskMgr.jpg   122.23KB   0 downloads


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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