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What's the best way to transfer files between 2 computers?


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#1 frusciante54

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Posted 24 October 2017 - 03:34 AM

I'll buy a new computer in 2 months and I have lots of files to transfer. Probably around 125-150 gbs of files. I've thought about some ways.

 

-Using DVD - Not so optional because they can only hold about 4 gb each time.

-Using a cable? - That would be very ideal, you know just like plugging my phone to a computer, if I can plug my old one to the new one and transfer files that way, it would be nice.

-Using an external drive - I don't have any external drives at the moment so just buying one for one time transfer is not so optional.

 

And lastly... FTP server. I've used FTP server to transfer files from my phone to my computer. It wasn't very fast but it was very ideal. So, would you reccomend using FTP server between 2 computers for about 150gbs of data? Would it take really long?

 

Or, do you have any other reccomendations/methods? Thanks in adance.



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#2 Platypus

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Posted 24 October 2017 - 03:48 AM

Probably around 125-150 gbs of files.


Are these files important? Do you have a backup of them anywhere now?

Having an external drive for backup is extremely useful, and a godsend if anything goes wrong with the HDD in your system. It's also the fastest way to transfer a large amount of files, particularly if you have USB3 available.

I'd suggest the view of an external drive as being for a one time transfer is much better seen as combining this with automatically having a backup of those files, and space for further backups of the system when you get the new computer.

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#3 frusciante54

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Posted 24 October 2017 - 04:00 AM

 

Probably around 125-150 gbs of files.


Are these files important? Do you have a backup of them anywhere now?

Having an external drive for backup is extremely useful, and a godsend if anything goes wrong with the HDD in your system. It's also the fastest way to transfer a large amount of files, particularly if you have USB3 available.

I'd suggest the view of an external drive as being for a one time transfer is much better seen as combining this with automatically having a backup of those files, and space for further backups of the system when you get the new computer.

 

The very important files are backed up on Google Drive which is about 5 gbs. The others are usually movies, tv series, games and my recording files. So, they don't really need to be backed up as they can be re-downloaded anytime I want. And if I were living in the US or Europe then I wouldn't really feel bad about buying one but because of currency issues, the external drives are very expensive here.



#4 buddy215

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Posted 24 October 2017 - 04:49 AM

Keep the old hdd and use it. Since it sounds like you won't be using it anymore...hence the transfer of files. Just get an external enclosure for it.

How to Install a Hard Drive into an External Enclosure - Tech Advisor


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#5 Platypus

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 12:51 AM

Or, if the new system is not a laptop, temporarily or permanently install the original HDD into the new computer, giving the fastest transfer rate between drives. If the old HDD must stay with the old computer, but the new system has an optical drive, its cables could be utilized just for the transfer without incurring any extra cost.

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#6 JoseRichardson

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 06:57 AM

  • Use professional third-party file transfer software
  • Sync via Cloud Services like Dropbox or Google Drive
  • Use a LAN cable and a software called IP messenger
  • Share Folders and Drives Locally


#7 ken1943

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Posted 04 November 2017 - 06:47 PM

Hard Drives and an external enclosure is the way I went. The backup hardware from say Western Digital is too expensive.



#8 CrystalLin

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Posted 07 November 2017 - 04:42 AM

You can use external sotrage media like USB flash dirve, network,  EasyTransfer Cable or third-party software like AOMEI Backupper to transfer files between two computers. 

 




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