Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

How Much Data Is Transmitted For Television?


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 wishmakingfairy

wishmakingfairy

  • Members
  • 212 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 22 October 2017 - 09:14 AM

I don't know how to properly ask this question. But I wanted to know if the data being transmitted through coax to watch tv as we have been for all these years is measurable. Only because I think about getting service through a coax to my modem, wouldn't televisions be the same?

 

If so, how much data is transmitted for television since all of those channels are available whenever you change the channel. Is it measured in mb? How was it measured initially?

 

I could be going about it all wrong but, any clarity would be nice just for the sake of learning and correcting my probably horribly wrong assessment.


Edited by wishmakingfairy, 22 October 2017 - 09:17 AM.

Using ubuntu and sharing how to as well as collecting how to scripts for common programs. Feel free to ask or share ^-^


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 The-Administrater

The-Administrater

  • Members
  • 61 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:34 PM

Posted 24 October 2017 - 02:04 AM

[deleted]


Edited by The-Administrater, 24 October 2017 - 02:06 AM.


#3 The-Toolman

The-Toolman

  • Members
  • 1,277 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 24 October 2017 - 01:22 PM

This may explain what you are wanting to know.

 

http://www.ciena.com/insights/articles/How-much-bandwidth-does-Broadcast-HD-video-use_prx.html


Edited by The-Toolman, 24 October 2017 - 01:26 PM.

I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

The world is what you make of it, if it doesn't fit, you make alterations.

 

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)


#4 mjd420nova

mjd420nova

  • Members
  • 1,770 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:34 AM

Posted 24 October 2017 - 04:18 PM

I guess I'd have to start with a primer.. The standard TV signal as allotted back in the analog days,  the video was almost 4 megacycles wide and the audio was adjacent to it in the spectrum, at 125 kilocycles.  Normal broadcast stations were 6 megacycles apart.  How much bandwidth does it take to transmit one single 5 MBit signal??  They could (and are) stacked on top of each other.  I have seen some stations with 16 sub channels.  How much bandwidth does it take to transmit the standard broadcast in digital form??   Then the question of cable comes in, with gigabit speeds for network and all the tv channel offerings.  Every signal, every station is present in the cable stream but the BOX is needed to decode first the access key and then the signal if allowed by the key.  An they send out signal on frequencies not used for tv broadcast so your tv can't tune their signals without the BOX.



#5 The-Toolman

The-Toolman

  • Members
  • 1,277 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 30 October 2017 - 06:17 AM

The standard TV signal as allotted back in the analog days,  the video was almost 4 megacycles wide and the audio was adjacent to it in the spectrum, at 125 kilocycles.  Normal broadcast stations were 6 megacycles apart. 

 

spec_ntsc_col.gif


Edited by The-Toolman, 30 October 2017 - 06:18 AM.

I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

The world is what you make of it, if it doesn't fit, you make alterations.

 

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users