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Discussion Topic Linux Mint 18.2 Mate


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#16 The-Toolman

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 03:37 PM

Hey pcpunk,

 

I've had some graphics tearing using open source drivers on some Linux Distros.

 

I have no idea why the panel and file manager gives you problems.

 

If you have a working Linux distro then leave it be and be happy.


Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)

 


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#17 pcpunk

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 03:50 PM

I have no idea why the panel and file manager gives you problems.

 

If you have a working Linux distro then leave it be and be happy.

No way, I'm on a mission to fix the File Manager issue, (lol) and then see if I can get the graphics even better.  I can try that on another pc maybe, or this one if I get frustrated enough...barrrarrrrahhh!  I want my Linux install to be better than Windows! haha


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#18 pcpunk

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 08:45 PM

Love the Login Screen on this Distro!


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Created by Mike_Walsh

 

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#19 cat1092

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 05:25 AM

Hey cat1092,

 

 

Exactly and the reason I like and use old computers and hardware they work and are free and if I don't have the hardware in my stash to upgrade them than it can be found on ebay for a few dollars. :thumbsup:

 

 

Yes, me too! :thumbup2:

 

Just found a like new copper heatsink for my newly acquired Dell Optiplex 780 MT for $14.99 shipped, needed for the Core2Quad Q9650. The included aluminum one is only good for the Core2Duo series CPU's, max is the E8400 running at 3.33GHz. Anything over that requires a copper cooler, in fact, the Core2Duo models also would benefit from the copper heatsink. 

 

Dell parts are very low cost on eBay, example have purchased three of the 1GB GDDR5 (Dell) Radeon 7570 GPU's for under $25. Not bad for a not too old GDDR5 card, wouldn't touch a DDR3 model with a ten foot pole, one of these with 2GB from the same OEM still wouldn't hold a candle to a GDDR5 card. 

 

As far as tearing goes, be it a onboard graphics chip or a $429 GPU with 8GB GDDR5 RAM, there will still be some present, and I'd suspect the same with the latest 1070 TI (new offering to be shipped on 11/02/17), as well as the more expensive 1080 Ti. Don't know if it's a Linux thing or the lack GPU support. Hopefully now that the AMD Ryzen will be releasing mobile CPU's, will once again be fully supported (no longer have to rely on half baked open source drivers) & have a chance to further correct the issue. :)

 

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-apu-ryzen-mobile-vega,35771.html

 

Still may be some time before these hits the market, yet anyone wanting an AMD notebook should avoid current promos as though a plague & wait for the Ryzen models. :thumbsup:

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 29 October 2017 - 05:28 AM.

ASUS Z97-PRO Gamer PC. EVGA GTX 1070 FTW + ACX 3.0 8GB GDDR5 GPU! 4K!  http://speccy.piriform.com/results/w3mBsNE6cJXW7on5sbNTFDc  (Updated 10/07/2017)

ASRock Z97 Extreme6, EVGA GTX 1060 FTW + ACX 3.0 6GB GDDR5 GPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/tbdS4YKHBvWROeKETAMBRKk  (Updated 04/12/2017))                                                                       

Dell XPS 8700, Revived from the Dead, EVGA GTX 1060 SSC + ACX 3.0 6GB GDDR5 GPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/KrNXc5IZ6HmJvrrLVSZbGzi  (Updated 05/17/2017)

ASUS 970 PRO Gaming AURA, with a cool running AMD Phenom x4 965 CPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/c0aVnEnmxFmqX5Pf1nOhCKf   (Updated 10/10/2017)

Dell Dimension 2400 Rebuild, Done the Right Way! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/MLv5xbYuI2vsLqvtS4PaDGB  (Updated 10/20/2017)


#20 The-Toolman

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 07:21 AM

 

Hey cat1092,

 

 

Exactly and the reason I like and use old computers and hardware they work and are free and if I don't have the hardware in my stash to upgrade them than it can be found on ebay for a few dollars. :thumbsup:

 

 

Yes, me too! :thumbup2:

 

Just found a like new copper heatsink for my newly acquired Dell Optiplex 780 MT for $14.99 shipped, needed for the Core2Quad Q9650. The included aluminum one is only good for the Core2Duo series CPU's, max is the E8400 running at 3.33GHz. Anything over that requires a copper cooler, in fact, the Core2Duo models also would benefit from the copper heatsink. 

 

Dell parts are very low cost on eBay, :thumbsup:

 

Cat

 

Hey cat1092,

 

Yep I agree Dell parts and just about anything needed can be found on eBay for a very low price and sometimes for just pennies. :thumbup2:

 

Yep I agree that copper heatsinks are better than aluminum heatsinks although I've never had any cooling issues with the OEM Dell aluminum heatsinks so I use them as it is what came installed from Dell and work well. :thumbup2:

 

I try to keep my computer upgrades form what I pull from my stash which has been accumulated from my off the curb collections and from others discarded computers.

 

I will however go to eBay and make computer parts purchases when I have a need for specific parts that aren't available from my parts stash.

 

 

Toolman :)


Edited by The-Toolman, 29 October 2017 - 07:24 AM.

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)

 


#21 The-Toolman

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 05:36 AM

:halloween: Happy Halloween :halloween:

 

:halloween: Happy Halloween :halloween:

 

:halloween: Happy Halloween :halloween:


Edited by The-Toolman, 30 October 2017 - 09:12 PM.

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)

 


#22 cat1092

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 06:23 AM

 

 

I try to keep my computer upgrades form what I pull from my stash which has been accumulated from my off the curb collections and from others discarded computers.

 

The-Toolman, so do I! :thumbup2:

 

Have a collection of components myself, although short on proprietary copper heatsinks, that Dell recommends (and are included) on systems with Core2Quad CPU's. Or any of their systems with CPU's running at 95W or higher. :)

 

I suppose that's why my XPS 8700 with an i7-4770 shipped with a heavy 100% aluminum cooler, because it runs at 84W, although if under heavy load, could surpass that. There are tools, of which I'm sure you have one, that shows exactly how much power a computer is pulling from the AC outlet. A friend brough his over to help me check to see if my 550W PSU's were enough & were by over 300W. Oddly, the microwave uses more power (when running) than my main two builds running at once. I need to get one of those, believe it's called Kill-a-Watt or similar name.

 

That's why I like cases that'll accept an aftermarket copper heatsink, am sure that the Optiplex 780 & other proprietary setups can be converted to a regular Socket 775 (or whatever) aftermarket, sometimes using an adapter. In the case of the Optiplex 780 MT, it's not exactly the heatsink itself, rather the bracket that holds it, that blocks a nice GPU upgrade. I'll work on that when other projects are completed, who knows, it may be that the copper tube heatsink in my now dead HP dc5800 w/out the huge housing may do the trick. Plus a small case mod, don't know what Dell was thinking when they placed the PCIe 16 slot all the way over, preventing a double width card from installing. With some YouTube instruction & some careful work, it can happen. :)

 

As far as Linux Mint MATE 18.2 goes, so far it's the best release ever! Lots of features & easy to use, even for a novice to Linux. :thumbsup:

 

Cat


ASUS Z97-PRO Gamer PC. EVGA GTX 1070 FTW + ACX 3.0 8GB GDDR5 GPU! 4K!  http://speccy.piriform.com/results/w3mBsNE6cJXW7on5sbNTFDc  (Updated 10/07/2017)

ASRock Z97 Extreme6, EVGA GTX 1060 FTW + ACX 3.0 6GB GDDR5 GPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/tbdS4YKHBvWROeKETAMBRKk  (Updated 04/12/2017))                                                                       

Dell XPS 8700, Revived from the Dead, EVGA GTX 1060 SSC + ACX 3.0 6GB GDDR5 GPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/KrNXc5IZ6HmJvrrLVSZbGzi  (Updated 05/17/2017)

ASUS 970 PRO Gaming AURA, with a cool running AMD Phenom x4 965 CPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/c0aVnEnmxFmqX5Pf1nOhCKf   (Updated 10/10/2017)

Dell Dimension 2400 Rebuild, Done the Right Way! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/MLv5xbYuI2vsLqvtS4PaDGB  (Updated 10/20/2017)


#23 The-Toolman

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 07:26 AM

Hey cat1092,

 

Yep I do have a few of the kilowatt hour meters and they are handy to learn what amount power electronic and electrical devices are using.

 

My Dell Optiplex 360 MT and Dell Optiplex 380 MT series desktop are probably the same form factor as your Dell Optiplex 780 MT and imo are the last Dell built like a tank desktop computers.

 

Dell had it together in those days as to what components were used for those desktops.

 

These Dell series were designed as office data computers and no thought as to them becoming a game tower where the owner would max it out with double wide graphics cards etc even though with the right components would do very well.

 

I agree that Linux Mint is an excellent choice for anyone regardless of their knowledge and skill level if one is willing to learn how to use Linux Mint.  :thumbup2:

 

 

Toolman  :)


Edited by The-Toolman, 01 November 2017 - 07:27 AM.

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#24 cat1092

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Posted 02 November 2017 - 06:40 AM

Toolman, yes these are built solid, not only do I have the Optiplex 780 MT, also the DT version, from which I pulled the Core2Quad Q9650 (3.0Ghz) from & placed on the MT. :thumbup2:

 

Found a Q9550 (2.83GHz) as a replacement for the 780 DT at $28 that in the opinion of many, found it crazy back when both were new, many were paying double for the Q9650 (breaking the $600 mark), when the Q9550 with just a small dip in speed sold for much less. Therefore, the Q9550 never hit it big on the charts, while the Q9650 was the craze. Oddly, after the CPU swap, ran the Windows WEI tool from Winaero (same as the original W7 one), and the score didn't dip in the least. On a capable Socket 775 MB, both are unlocked CPU's, both has a 12MB L2 cache (no L3), yet more L2 means more than a small L2 & huge L3 and that holds true to this day. Most of the 1st gen i7's couldn't hold a candle to the Q9650's performance, plus there's a couple of 130W models that are still a bit pricey to this day, I suppose Intel's then $1,000 offerings, as they always had at least one, even before Socket 775. 

 

Unfortunately, even if I were to purchase one of the 130W versions, won't run in the Optiplex 780 or any Dell PC that I'm aware of (other than maybe a server). :)

 

I also like to mix things around, another of my dual boot PC's with Linux Mint 18.2 now features a Phenom 965 x4, back when a quad core by AMD was just that. Also have the 95W Phenom 945 x4 running in a Optiplex 740 DT (featuring one of those crappy NVIDIA MB's :(), these plus the Q9550 were recent purchases. Wanted the Phenom ll x6 1100T, the price for the few available were just too costly, given it's age. This many folks can't be wrong, and am positive that the FX-6300 CPU shown beneath, as well as the FX-8350, of which I own both, purchased new, would be left in a dust cloud by the Phenom ll x6 1100T. :P

 

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103913

 

Nor based on my real world usage, can the FX-6300 can truly be a better performer than the Phenom 965 x4. No way in this world can what's basically three physical cores the equivalent of H/T beat a true high powered quad. I know, the below are in my builds. What must I do, install both in the same model MB, RAM & GPU to prove it? Have two ASRock 970M Pro3 in usage, both running the FX series CPU's.

 

https://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+Phenom+II+X4+965

 

https://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+FX-6300+Six-Core&id=1781

 

And this bench is a slap in the face, an insult to my intelligence and many others, to say a 125W 6 core Phenom 1100T still ranks below the FX-6300. How can 6 physical cores, especially with the multipliers jacked to (or near) the max, lose to a CPU with three physical & three virtual cores? :question:

 

https://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+Phenom+II+X6+1100T

 

in my opinion, it's safe to say that AMD should had continued development of the Phenoms rather than going with the FX series CPU's, yet (it was stated) there was no future path for the AM3 platform & reviewers were stating to those considering the purchase to 'hold back'..Still, I believe that AMD could have had more success with converting the Phenoms to AM3+ & selling quad & six cores honestly. BTW, Linux Mint 18.2 screams on both Phenoms, am about to remove a set (16GB total) of DDR3-2400MHz TridentX RAM modules from my 2nd best Intel build to install in the ASUS 970 Gaming/AURA build where the Phenom 965 x4 is installed. The Intel i5-4690K build will still run quite well with the other lone 16GB RAM kit, no need for me to pay $60 more ($159.99) than when on promo a few months back for $99.99 each (purchased a total of four for my best two builds). May also help with the memory controller longevity of the i5-4690K, which is clocked to match stock performance of it's larger brother Devil's Canyon in the i7-4790K. Unfortunately, I can't get the same percentage of performance out of the latter, 4.8Ghz causes BSOD's 50% of the time. :(

 

Even if I have to downclock to 2133MHz on the ASUS Pro Gaming/AURA due to CPU limitations, the gain will be worth it & needless to say, Linux Mint 18.2 will be flying high! :thumbsup:

 

So as you can see, I like my golden oldie CPU's also, even if these pulls more juice from the wall, the Phenom 965 x4 & FX-8350 are my only 125W CPU's & not used that often. Would like to also get a decent GPU for both, maybe a 1050 Ti, of if lucky, another 1060. Being that I'm saving for my next build, kind of hard to justify upgrading the GPU in my main PC, even if another would benefit from the GTX 1070. Maybe I can score a good deal somewhere locally, don't want to mess with respectable models on eBay, most has been running 24/7 for mining, probably best to bite a small bullet & grab a couple of GTX 1050 TI's on when on frequent promo for $139-149 each :)

 

Either way, Linux Mint 18.2 will scream on my latest legacy builds & two already does. See, I like older hardware myself, especially after discovering that Intel was bonding their CPU's together with low cost thermal paste & glue (why one core may be reading around 10C hotter than the rest on a couple). That's why my next all new build will be AMD, with a NVIDIA GPU. In the meantime, need to get my hands on a low cost Haswell Pentium & the proper tool to separate & seal pre & post delid & start practicing. :lol:

 

Linux Mint 18.2 will run well on most any 64 bit computer, even legacy builds, although don't know how well beyond Socket 775. Even with 4-5 Firefox tabs open, and 10 Google Chrome tabs, still uses only around 2GB RAM & no swap usage on most all of my installs. I cannot recommend the distro enough, to both novices & seasoned pros alike, there's something for most everyone in the distro, another reason why I recommend it over the Xfce edition when installing for others. :)

 

Cat


ASUS Z97-PRO Gamer PC. EVGA GTX 1070 FTW + ACX 3.0 8GB GDDR5 GPU! 4K!  http://speccy.piriform.com/results/w3mBsNE6cJXW7on5sbNTFDc  (Updated 10/07/2017)

ASRock Z97 Extreme6, EVGA GTX 1060 FTW + ACX 3.0 6GB GDDR5 GPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/tbdS4YKHBvWROeKETAMBRKk  (Updated 04/12/2017))                                                                       

Dell XPS 8700, Revived from the Dead, EVGA GTX 1060 SSC + ACX 3.0 6GB GDDR5 GPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/KrNXc5IZ6HmJvrrLVSZbGzi  (Updated 05/17/2017)

ASUS 970 PRO Gaming AURA, with a cool running AMD Phenom x4 965 CPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/c0aVnEnmxFmqX5Pf1nOhCKf   (Updated 10/10/2017)

Dell Dimension 2400 Rebuild, Done the Right Way! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/MLv5xbYuI2vsLqvtS4PaDGB  (Updated 10/20/2017)


#25 The-Toolman

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Posted 02 November 2017 - 08:34 AM

See, I like older hardware myself, especially after discovering that Intel was bonding their CPU's together with low cost thermal paste & glue (why one core may be reading around 10C hotter than the rest on a couple). That's why my next all new build will be AMD, with a NVIDIA GPU. In the meantime, need to get my hands on a low cost Haswell Pentium & the proper tool to separate & seal pre & post delid & start practicing. :lol:

 

Cat

Hey cat1092,

 

I've delided a few of those Intel processors using only an X-Acto knife and patience carefully cutting around the outside edge of the metal heat spreader.

Once inside just clean the old paste off using isopropyl alcohol and then place the processor into the socket and and apply some Arctic Silver 5 and then clean off the silicone glue and the paste from the heat spreader and place it onto the top of the processor and latch it.

 

The processor latch will hold the heat spreader in place and all is well.  :thumbup2:

 

Keep your fingers away from the cutting direction of the X-Acto knife.

 

Toolman  :)

 

 

http://www.overclock.net/t/1309867/short-and-direct-delid-guide-ivy-bridge


Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)

 


#26 cat1092

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 05:24 AM

Toolman, yes I seen that in a YouTube video, before & after delid (same way you mention), using Arctic MX-2, temps dropped by over 20C! :thumbsup:

 

If my memory serves me correct, the CPU used was a i7-4770K. The best thing was, no more thermal throttling during XTU runs, until I purchased quality aftermarket coolers (one a Noctua NH-D15). Yes it's gigantic, the largest item in the case, yet it was well worth the (then) promo price of $79.99 shipped. 

 

4r3TmQV.jpg

 

6LPOApC.jpg

 

I once ran Linux Mint 18.2 MATE on the PC, until I got my first 4K monitor, while Windows adjusted automatically to compensate for the higher pixel count, Linux Mint 18.2 didn't, everything was so tiny. Al & others did their best to assist, yet still the panel items were so dang small, now just running W10 Pro on the PC, am considering downgrading back to 8.1 Pro w/Media Center because am fed up with upgrades that aren't 'road ready' upon release. Two separate PC's, one AMD based, the other my best with i7-4790K, when W10 1709 was released, the Start Menu doesn't work correctly or doesn't respond at all. Kind of surprising & disappointing, considering I had ran the previews for that release for over three months w/out issue. Leave it to Team Blue, they'll always find a way to mess something up. :(

 

At this time, not being able to natively adapt to 4K is my #1 complaint against the Mint team. Because on any other monitor that I own, Mint 18.2 displays correctly w/out the need for adjustment, other than notebooks. 

 

Which one of those X-Acto knifes do you have? Seen some from $2.99 (only a 2 star average review, blades breaking) to those that are over $10. i don't want to take the chance with some flimsy garb, cut myself long ago when one of my first employers used ultra cheap box cutters, emergency room visit required.

 

Also have two unopened tubes of Arctic Silver 5 (aka, 'AC5'), this would be a great experiment. Did you cover any contact points around the die (if any) with clear fingernail polish like many goes with GPU's? :)

 

Cat


ASUS Z97-PRO Gamer PC. EVGA GTX 1070 FTW + ACX 3.0 8GB GDDR5 GPU! 4K!  http://speccy.piriform.com/results/w3mBsNE6cJXW7on5sbNTFDc  (Updated 10/07/2017)

ASRock Z97 Extreme6, EVGA GTX 1060 FTW + ACX 3.0 6GB GDDR5 GPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/tbdS4YKHBvWROeKETAMBRKk  (Updated 04/12/2017))                                                                       

Dell XPS 8700, Revived from the Dead, EVGA GTX 1060 SSC + ACX 3.0 6GB GDDR5 GPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/KrNXc5IZ6HmJvrrLVSZbGzi  (Updated 05/17/2017)

ASUS 970 PRO Gaming AURA, with a cool running AMD Phenom x4 965 CPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/c0aVnEnmxFmqX5Pf1nOhCKf   (Updated 10/10/2017)

Dell Dimension 2400 Rebuild, Done the Right Way! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/MLv5xbYuI2vsLqvtS4PaDGB  (Updated 10/20/2017)


#27 The-Toolman

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 07:24 AM

Hey cat1092,

 

The X-Acto knife I have is just a basic one I grabbed from work one day although it seemed to be a good X-Acto knife it didn't appear to be anything special.

 

The main thing when using an X-Acto knife is to not bear down with a lot of pressure as that damn sure will break the  blades on them.

 

If any doubt exists about using an X-Acto knife then perhaps the actual deliding tool might be the better option as an emergency room visit isn't cheap.

 

As for covering contact points around the die I did not bother.

 

I do recommend using the Arctic Silver 5 as imo it is still the best thermal paste around. :thumbup2:

 

 

Toolman :)


Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)

 


#28 cat1092

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Posted 06 November 2017 - 05:17 AM

Toolman, I believe I'll not take the chance & get the tool designed for the job, already banged up badly, don't need to add to the list of aliments. Even if the cost is $50, is well worth it & quite less costly than an ER visit. :lol:

 

Separates & reseals the CPU with the same tool and easy to use. Although those with the new i9 CPU's needs a different one that likely costs more, due to high demand. :)

 

Also happen to have two unopened tubes of AC5, just finished using up a tube of the pricy per gram (although goes a long way) Noctua NT-H1 paste, while good, is stated to need to be reapplied more often than most of the rest. Can't really tell any difference (for now) between that & Arctic MX-4, other than the smaller tube for the same price (NT-H1) & the 8 year warranty of MX-4 am finishing off before my return to AC5. To be honest, AC5 should last just as long as MX-4, because under normal use only, is like a Toyota of the 70's through 90's, takes a long time just to break in, unless a few long Prime95 runs are made. Which I don't like to use, because it's not just the CPU tortured, also the MB gets very hot.

 

Instead, I use CPU Eater Demo, a lot safer, and run in 10 minute increments, working my way to 30 minutes through two hours, with a 10 minute cool between the long runs. The MB doesn't get as hot with this tool created by Bitsum, I believe to be a one-man show. Known primarily for their CPU optimization tool, Process Lasso (free & Pro), as well as the free Park Control app, which is inbuilt into the Pro versions, have an Entire Home Pro key of Lasso. CPU Eater is free, just showing a demo of how Park Control works, yet does a great job of keeping all CPU cores jacked up to 100% w/out excessive heat

 

https://bitsum.com/cpu-eater-demo/

 

With Linux Mint 18.2, there's also a way to accomplish the same, just as with CPU Eater Demo, specify the time & number of cores. 

 

 

 

stress --cpu 2 --timeout 60

 

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/2925606/how-to-create-a-cpu-spike-with-a-bash-command

 

That command has been upvoted 232 times as of this post, good to have when running Linux only. All pastes needs to be broken in a bit to spread evenly for maximum efficiency (evenly distributed heat transfer). Linux systems generally runs much cooler than most others & may not generate enough heat needed during normal usage to complete the task. the above command provides that option. :)

 

Will give AC5 the go for first deliding job, may compare different CPU's of the same gen (Haswell) with that & MX-4, starting with the i7-4770 & then 4790K, maybe one or the other can help me get to the 5GHz mark with the latter CPU on air (4.8Ghz is my best & 70% chance of BSOD :(). That liquid metal thermal interface isn't w/out risk, where any contact areas of the die would benefit from a couple of coats of clear nail polish & also gets expensive if not performed correctly. One small & expensive tube being only enough for two or three applications, if lucky. 

 

As can be seen below, I love to benchmark, took over 4 months & many BSOD's to break my previous record of 1221 marks, always coming up just 2-3 point short, finally made it! I believe that running at 5GHz, could get into record setting zone on air. :thumbsup:

 

http://hwbot.org/user/cat1092/

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 06 November 2017 - 05:28 AM.

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ASRock Z97 Extreme6, EVGA GTX 1060 FTW + ACX 3.0 6GB GDDR5 GPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/tbdS4YKHBvWROeKETAMBRKk  (Updated 04/12/2017))                                                                       

Dell XPS 8700, Revived from the Dead, EVGA GTX 1060 SSC + ACX 3.0 6GB GDDR5 GPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/KrNXc5IZ6HmJvrrLVSZbGzi  (Updated 05/17/2017)

ASUS 970 PRO Gaming AURA, with a cool running AMD Phenom x4 965 CPU! http://speccy.piriform.com/results/c0aVnEnmxFmqX5Pf1nOhCKf   (Updated 10/10/2017)

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