Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Computer keeps crashing/restarting


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Steelpen2

Steelpen2

  • Members
  • 23 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:39 AM

Posted 19 October 2017 - 05:02 PM

I am trying to figure out what is going  on with my computer. My computer crashes/restarts a few times a day. I see it more often when I try to play a video, be it on YouTube, or one that is on my computer locally. I have even tried to play games, and it crashes as soon as I start. I don't know whether it's an overheating issue or RAM, or something. What can I do to find out the issue? Thank you for any support and/or advice!

 

Oh and I have Windows 10 Pro


Edited by Steelpen2, 19 October 2017 - 05:20 PM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,460 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:02:39 AM

Posted 20 October 2017 - 08:55 AM

What is the make and model of this computer?

 

When the computer shuts down does it do this just instantly turn off?

 

How long is the time between when the computer shuts down and then restarts?

 

Please download and install Speccy to provide us with information about your computer.  Clicking on this link will automatically initiate the download.

When Speccy opens you will see a screen similar to the one below.

 speccy1.png

Click on File which is outlined in red in the screen above, and then click on Publish Snapshot.

 speccy2.png

The following screen will appear, click on Yes.

 speccy3.png

The following screen will appear, click on Copy to Clipboard.

In your next post right click inside the Reply to Topic box, then click on Paste.  This will load a link to the Speccy log.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#3 Steelpen2

Steelpen2
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 23 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:39 AM

Posted 20 October 2017 - 06:14 PM

What is the make and model of this computer?

 

When the computer shuts down does it do this just instantly turn off?

 

How long is the time between when the computer shuts down and then restarts?

 

 

My computer has no make or model as I built it, but the Speccy information would help.

 

Sometimes it instantly turns off, and I have to push the power button back on. Sometimes it turns off and then automatically turns on.

 

A second or two, if it restarts.

 

Also, when I ran the Speccy, I noticed it did not detect my Optical Drive. It does eject so I don't know what's going on there.

 

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/zM3nct3MhKQSuqmbKpeUSLb



#4 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 5,737 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:05:39 AM

Posted 20 October 2017 - 07:52 PM

Sounds like a PSU or a Power Button Connection issue to me.  What Case are you using, that would be a good start.  Is it old, and have an old Power Button, or did you build it all with new parts?  That processor is from Vista Era...yuck.  I tried running Windows 7 on one of those E5200 and it was horrible.  I suppose Windows 10 uses less cpu but still.  I wonder if the PSU is able to run everything you are running on it?

 

Just as another diagnostic for you, turn off the PC, unplug it and Press the Power Button to dispel all the residual energy.  Now Un-Plug and Re-Plug in the Power On Button Connection on the MotherBoard three or four times, then Re-Test and see if you have the same issues.  These connections on old pc's will go bad, and sometimes just unplugging them and re-plugging will fix them.  If you think the connections are real dirty then carefully clean them with some Alcohol, then let completely dry before reuse, or blow them off with some canned air. 


Edited by pcpunk, 20 October 2017 - 08:04 PM.

sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#5 Steelpen2

Steelpen2
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 23 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:39 AM

Posted 20 October 2017 - 08:15 PM

I want to say that I built this in 2009, so it's fairly old. I probably should upgrade to a new one! Here is my case: Rosewill TU-155-P Black 0.8mm SGCC Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case.

 

Also, I cannot replicate this issue on my own, it just happens randomly.



#6 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 5,737 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:05:39 AM

Posted 20 October 2017 - 08:53 PM

Follow my direction and see if it helps.

 

I would at least get a little better CPU, that thing is pitiful lol.  If it works for you than that's fine.

 

Your SSD Looks ok to me but don't like this:

Attribute name: Unexpected Power Loss
Real value: 3,647
Current: 0
Worst: 0
Threshold: 0
Raw Value: 0000000E3F
Status: Good

This seems to verify what you are saying, and again, I would check the Power Button Connection first.

 

What PSU do you have?

 

Once you fix this, I would consider there are System Files that are now Corrupted because of all these Unexpected Power Loss Events.  In fact, your SSD may not be good anymore.


Edited by pcpunk, 21 October 2017 - 08:35 AM.

sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#7 xrobwx

xrobwx

  • Members
  • 161 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Panama City Beach, FL USA
  • Local time:04:39 AM

Posted 21 October 2017 - 08:37 AM

Voltage
CPU CORE: 
1.248 V
MEMORY CONTROLLER: 
1.808 V
+3.3V: 
3.504 V
+5V: 
5.027 V
+12V: 
2.176 V
+5V HIGH THRESHOLD: 
5.430 V
 
PCI Data
 
The 2.176V on the +12V rail is suspect. Although, I've seen on here discussed many times, software rendering of voltages can be suspect themselves. 


#8 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 5,737 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:05:39 AM

Posted 21 October 2017 - 09:02 AM

xrobwx, Speccy doesn't always report these things accurately.  I feel the important thing is to try or test a few things to start with.  If I am reading that correctly, 3,647 Unexpected Power Loss Events is excessive.  So there must be some definitive hardware failure or bad connection there somewhere.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#9 xrobwx

xrobwx

  • Members
  • 161 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Panama City Beach, FL USA
  • Local time:04:39 AM

Posted 21 October 2017 - 10:26 AM

xrobwx, Speccy doesn't always report these things accurately.  I feel the important thing is to try or test a few things to start with.  If I am reading that correctly, 3,647 Unexpected Power Loss Events is excessive.  So there must be some definitive hardware failure or bad connection there somewhere.

True that!  :) Glad to see you back online! 

:thumbup2:


Edited by xrobwx, 21 October 2017 - 10:26 AM.


#10 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,460 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:02:39 AM

Posted 21 October 2017 - 10:36 AM

@Steelpen2

 

Your ssd's C: Drive only has 5.61GB of free space, that's 6% of free space.  On a partition of this size you should have at least 15% free space. 

 

Because you only have 4GB of RAM the swap space on this drive will wind up being used when you are running programs which are resource intensive.  A swap file or swap space is a space on a hard disk used as a virtual memory extension of a computer's RAM. Having a swap file allows your computer's operating system to utilize the ssd to use its virtual memory to increase the amount of memory.  This is a oversimplification, but you should get the idea.

 

Your Seagate has a great deal of space on its two partitions, I would transfer files and applications to this hdd to free up space on your ssd.

 

 

You need to test the rail voltages of your PSU.  This can be done with the use of a multimeter with a DC Voltage scale.  The following method will allow the PSU to run while bypassing the motherboard and other components.  The case fan will run which will place a load on the PSU which will produce more accurate voltage readings than just reading from the PSU by itself.

 

The following procedure involves working with components inside the case and live voltages ranging from +3.3V to +12V.  You need to follow the instructions carefully to avoid damage to the components inside the case and keep yourself safe.

The motherboard usually initiates the start or the PSU when the power button is pressed.  This shorts the two wires from the power switch which send a signal to the PSU to start it.  This signal travels back to the PSU via the green wire in the 24 wire connector.

Make sure the computer is turned off before going further.  With the computer turned off disconnect the power cord from the PSU from the wall receptacle.

Open the side of the case.  Important:  Before touching any of the components inside the case you need to discharge any static electricity in your body by touch the metal of the inside of the case.  It only takes as little as 10Volts to kill integrated circuits like the ones on your RAM modules, the human body can discharge amount of voltage in access of 2K Volts.

The PSU has a 24 pin connector which is attached to the motherboard, this needs to be removed from the motherboard.  This connector has a clip on the front side of the connector which needs to be depressed to in order to disconnect the connector from the motherboard.

alGl4NP.png

With the connector free you will need to place a jumper between the socket of the green wire (there's only the one in this bundle) and any black wire socket.  A small piece of wire or a paper clip can be used for this, just make sure the jumper isn't touching anything else.

With the jumper in place it's time to turn the computer on.  All you need to do is plug the power cord back into the receptacle, this will start the PSU.

With the PSU running you should have at least the case fan and the PSU fan running.  When the power is on use a multimeter to read the +3.3V, +5V, and +12V rail voltages.  You will want to set the meter to a 20V DC scale.

Yellow +12VDC

Red +5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC

Readings should not have variances larger than +/- five percent.  

Maximum.........Minimum
12.6V.................11.4V
5.25V.................4.75V
3.47V.................3.14V

If you are able to do this and have voltages within their normal ranges the PSU should be good.

To restore the computer to its operational condition unplug the power cord, remove the jumper from the 24 pin connector and reattach it to the motherboard.  Plug the PSU back in and the computer can be started with the power button.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#11 Steelpen2

Steelpen2
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 23 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:39 AM

Posted 21 October 2017 - 03:09 PM

Follow my direction and see if it helps.

 

I would at least get a little better CPU, that thing is pitiful lol.  If it works for you than that's fine.

 

Your SSD Looks ok to me but don't like this:

Attribute name: Unexpected Power Loss
Real value: 3,647
Current: 0
Worst: 0
Threshold: 0
Raw Value: 0000000E3F
Status: Good

This seems to verify what you are saying, and again, I would check the Power Button Connection first.

 

What PSU do you have?

 

Once you fix this, I would consider there are System Files that are now Corrupted because of all these Unexpected Power Loss Events.  In fact, your SSD may not be good anymore.

 

My PSU is a

Rosewill RP650-2 650W ATX12V v2.3 & EPS12V v2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready Active PFC Power Supply

 

@Steelpen2

 

Your ssd's C: Drive only has 5.61GB of free space, that's 6% of free space.  On a partition of this size you should have at least 15% free space. 

 

Because you only have 4GB of RAM the swap space on this drive will wind up being used when you are running programs which are resource intensive.  A swap file or swap space is a space on a hard disk used as a virtual memory extension of a computer's RAM. Having a swap file allows your computer's operating system to utilize the ssd to use its virtual memory to increase the amount of memory.  This is a oversimplification, but you should get the idea.

 

Your Seagate has a great deal of space on its two partitions, I would transfer files and applications to this hdd to free up space on your ssd.

 

 

You need to test the rail voltages of your PSU.  This can be done with the use of a multimeter with a DC Voltage scale.  The following method will allow the PSU to run while bypassing the motherboard and other components.  The case fan will run which will place a load on the PSU which will produce more accurate voltage readings than just reading from the PSU by itself.

 

The following procedure involves working with components inside the case and live voltages ranging from +3.3V to +12V.  You need to follow the instructions carefully to avoid damage to the components inside the case and keep yourself safe.

The motherboard usually initiates the start or the PSU when the power button is pressed.  This shorts the two wires from the power switch which send a signal to the PSU to start it.  This signal travels back to the PSU via the green wire in the 24 wire connector.

Make sure the computer is turned off before going further.  With the computer turned off disconnect the power cord from the PSU from the wall receptacle.

Open the side of the case.  Important:  Before touching any of the components inside the case you need to discharge any static electricity in your body by touch the metal of the inside of the case.  It only takes as little as 10Volts to kill integrated circuits like the ones on your RAM modules, the human body can discharge amount of voltage in access of 2K Volts.

The PSU has a 24 pin connector which is attached to the motherboard, this needs to be removed from the motherboard.  This connector has a clip on the front side of the connector which needs to be depressed to in order to disconnect the connector from the motherboard.

alGl4NP.png

With the connector free you will need to place a jumper between the socket of the green wire (there's only the one in this bundle) and any black wire socket.  A small piece of wire or a paper clip can be used for this, just make sure the jumper isn't touching anything else.

With the jumper in place it's time to turn the computer on.  All you need to do is plug the power cord back into the receptacle, this will start the PSU.

With the PSU running you should have at least the case fan and the PSU fan running.  When the power is on use a multimeter to read the +3.3V, +5V, and +12V rail voltages.  You will want to set the meter to a 20V DC scale.

Yellow +12VDC

Red +5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC

Readings should not have variances larger than +/- five percent.  

Maximum.........Minimum
12.6V.................11.4V
5.25V.................4.75V
3.47V.................3.14V

If you are able to do this and have voltages within their normal ranges the PSU should be good.

To restore the computer to its operational condition unplug the power cord, remove the jumper from the 24 pin connector and reattach it to the motherboard.  Plug the PSU back in and the computer can be started with the power button.

 

 

I have freed some space on my SSD to above 30 gigs. Now I need to find a multimetter. I don't have one of those.



#12 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 5,737 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:05:39 AM

Posted 21 October 2017 - 04:39 PM

Steelpen2, you don't really need to Quote all that stuff to relay two lines of text my friend.  It will make the Thread much shorter and easier to read for you and others, unless the Quote is needed of course.

 

Great of dc3 to see that your SSD was getting Full!

 

I would start with the easiest thing first, Diagnosing the Power Button, then move to the PSU when you get a meter.  I just fixed a pc that I thought needed a PSU and it was the Power Button Connection the whole time.  I've seen the same with Fans etc, the connections on these older machines will fail after a while.  But then realize, the pc may not run properly anyhow do to all the Unexpected Power Loss Events.  You could then create yourself a Linux Bootable Operating System to see if the pc will then work properly, and test it for a while with this.  This will boot an operating system eliminating your SSD and the OS on it, and run only from the USB or DVD...whichever you choose.  None of this, including Malware Scans, should be done until the Power issue is fixed though, otherwise the situation is just getting worse for the SSD.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#13 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,460 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:02:39 AM

Posted 23 October 2017 - 08:47 AM

The power button is a momentary switch.  This is like the old door bell button which would ring the doorbell and keep ringing as long as the button is pressed.  This switch shorts the two pins in the start header which in turn sends a signal to the PSU to start it.  The easiest way to test this switch is with a Ohm meter, when the button is pressed the meter should zero out.  But you can test this by shorting those two pens with a screwdriver, this does the same thing.

 

One of the things you should be aware of with a computer that is around eight years old, the electrolytic capacitors breakdown over time and can eventually fail or at the very least lose power.  In a PSU there are large electrolytic capacitors as well which could be contributing to your power problem.  A motherboard has circuitry which electrolytic capacitors regulate the voltage.  If these start to fail it can cause instability in those circuits.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users