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Confused About Downloading ISO Updates


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#1 blub

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Posted 19 October 2017 - 02:04 AM

Is there a way to download updates to a flash drive without having to reinstall Windows 10? It looks like to me that those 3GB+ ISO files are the updates combined with Windows 10. I'm not interested in that, I just want the updates. Am I misunderstanding something?

 

I'm stuck on dialup so I have to download the updates from a relative's house and they have satellite internet. It could take forever to download a file over 3GB. I'd probably be better off taking the whole computer over and leaving it for a week. I'd consider doing that, but the last time either of us transported a desktop computer in a car, the hard drives got damaged and I was super careful with mine.



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#2 Platypus

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Posted 19 October 2017 - 02:26 AM

Updates combined into a single download are called a Rollup, and I don't know of any Rollups being produced for Windows 10, but someone else may have better information than me. The Rollups supplied for Windows cover versions prior to Windows 10:

 

http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=2017%20Security%20Monthly%20Quality%20Rollup

 

If you have periodic access to a reasonable internet service, it should only be necessary to use it as long as it takes for Windows Update to install the available updates. There will be no need to download a very large file. However it does mean transporting the computer, as you say.


Edited by Platypus, 19 October 2017 - 02:27 AM.

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#3 britechguy

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Posted 19 October 2017 - 10:17 AM

I'm not quite sure exactly what you're asking, as Windows 10 must be updated from version to version as the versions roll out (though not at the moment they roll out).  Versions do drop out of support and Version 1511 was the latest to do this and 1607 will only be a few months behind that.

 

There does exist an update catalog for the patches applied within a version, but you should be getting those anyway as part of the normal Windows Update process.

 

Your best bet would be following the instructions for Updating Windows 10 using the Windows 10 ISO file, but where you actually download the ISO and create bootable media on another computer when you're somewhere that has at least DSL or better as the internet connection.

 

Right now the ISO for Version 1709 just went live on Tuesday, 10/17, so there are very few additional updates on top of the ISO, although there are a couple.  If you are installing on a machine that is connected by dial-up then I would choose the "Not right now" option on the Get important updates step and allow any updates to download as part of normal Windows Update after you have Version 1709 installed.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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