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PC wil not turn on when SATA cables are connected to PSU?


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Kappa69117

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 09:29 PM

As it says in the title, I can not turn on pc when the SATA cables are connected. In addition, PC will only turn on when SATA cables are disconnected. I've tried connecting the connection to a different SATA ports to no avail. Therefore, is it a HDD problem, or a PSU problem? Thanks in advance for your help guys.



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#2 Platypus

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 12:27 AM

Hello, your post is confusing, as you do not connect SATA cables to the PSU. Please explain more precisely which cables have to be disconnected.

I can not turn on pc when the SATA cables are connected. In addition, PC will only turn on when SATA cables are disconnected.

This reads as saying the same thing twice.

Do you mean your PSU has modular power cables, and you can make the PC able to power on by disconnecting the modular cable that supplies power to the SATA drives, but also by leaving the PSU connection there but unplugging cables from the SATA ports on the mainboard?

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#3 mightywiz

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 12:27 PM

I would check PSU 12v & 5v voltages that supply the HDD if they are ok then I would try a different HDD.  because if you are plugging in the SATA connector and it's failing then it's got to be the Device you plugging into.    also recheck the voltages while SATA device is plugged in on computer is on.



#4 Kilroy

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 01:36 PM

I'm guessing you have a modular power supply.  To determine if the issue is the cable or the drive disconnect it from the drive and leave it connected to the power supply.  If you have the same issue with the drive connected then there is either an issue with the cable, or the power supply.



#5 Kappa69117

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 07:15 PM

I'm guessing you have a modular power supply.  To determine if the issue is the cable or the drive disconnect it from the drive and leave it connected to the power supply.  If you have the same issue with the drive connected then there is either an issue with the cable, or the power supply.

I have a semi modular psu btw. However, I tried disconnecting the cable from the drive and powering my pc on and it worked. Therefore, it's the HDD. So my question is, do you think my pc should work if I replace the faulty HDD?



#6 Platypus

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 07:36 PM

It would be possible, but not common, for a faulty HDD to cause damage to anything else. So it's most likely that replacing the HDD will solve the problem.

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#7 Kappa69117

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 08:02 PM

It would be possible, but not common, for a faulty HDD to cause damage to anything else. So it's most likely that replacing the HDD will solve the problem.

Alright, thanks. I'm going to get the new HDD soon today and will report back if it works or not.



#8 dc3

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Posted Yesterday, 11:12 AM

If you have another computer you could connect the hdd to you could run SeaTools for Windows.  When you start the scan it will list all of the drives installed on the computer, it will scan all of the drives listed and post a pass or fail for the scan.  You will want to install the SeaTools for windows on the spare computer.
 
Please download and run SeaTools for Windows

Before the installation begins you will be prompted to either Decline or Accept the terms of the installation, click on I Accept.

Once the installation of SeatTools for Windows begins you will see an image similar to the one below.

Cn0u1vP.png

1.  SeaTools for Windows will search for HDDs and SSDs on your computer.  Please remove any external storage devices connected via USB ports.

2.  Detected Drives will list the HDDs and SSDs found.  Place a check mark in the drive box you want to run the scan on.  This should be the drive that has the operating system installed on it, this is usually C: drive.

3.  You will see Basic Tests toolbar above Detected Drives, move the mouse pointer over this to open the test options.  Please click on Long Generic Test

4.  This will start the scan.  When the scan is complete you will see the result under Test Status , please post the results in your topic.

5.  The test will indicate either Pass or Fail.  Post the results of the scan in your topic.

irtNzsc.png

6.  Click on Help, then click on View Log File.  If the scan failed take a screen shot of the Log File and post it in your topic.



 


Edited by dc3, Yesterday, 11:41 AM.

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#9 Kappa69117

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Posted Today, 12:36 AM

Ok, sadly today I wasn't able to power up my PC with the HDD installed. Fortunately, I have a friend who has another pc who said they're willing to help me test it on their pc hopefully. I think that my problem may be the motherboard or the PSU. Not sure though. Also, i don't think the problem is the HDD itself, but rather it's a PSU/MOBO problem. This has been a long and kind of frustrating process. :(

 

If you have another computer you could connect the hdd to you could run SeaTools for Windows.  When you start the scan it will list all of the drives installed on the computer, it will scan all of the drives listed and post a pass or fail for the scan.  You will want to install the SeaTools for windows on the spare computer.
 
Please download and run SeaTools for Windows

Before the installation begins you will be prompted to either Decline or Accept the terms of the installation, click on I Accept.

Once the installation of SeatTools for Windows begins you will see an image similar to the one below.

Cn0u1vP.png

1.  SeaTools for Windows will search for HDDs and SSDs on your computer.  Please remove any external storage devices connected via USB ports.

2.  Detected Drives will list the HDDs and SSDs found.  Place a check mark in the drive box you want to run the scan on.  This should be the drive that has the operating system installed on it, this is usually C: drive.

3.  You will see Basic Tests toolbar above Detected Drives, move the mouse pointer over this to open the test options.  Please click on Long Generic Test

4.  This will start the scan.  When the scan is complete you will see the result under Test Status , please post the results in your topic.

5.  The test will indicate either Pass or Fail.  Post the results of the scan in your topic.

irtNzsc.png

6.  Click on Help, then click on View Log File.  If the scan failed take a screen shot of the Log File and post it in your topic.



 



#10 dc3

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Posted Today, 11:00 AM

If you have a multimeter or can borrow one you can separate the motherboard from the PSU to test the PSU.  I would do this first.

 

The following procedure involves working with components inside the case and live voltages ranging from +3.3V to +12V.  You need to follow the instructions carefully to avoid damage to the components inside the case and keep yourself safe.

 

The motherboard usually initiates the start or the PSU when the power button is pressed.  This shorts the two wires from the power switch which send a signal to the PSU to start it.  This signal travel back to the PSU via the green wire in the 24 wire connector.

 

Make sure the computer is turned off before going further.  With the computer turned off disconnect the power cord from the PSU from the wall receptacle.

 

Open the side of the case.  Important:  Before touching any of the components inside the case you need to discharge any static electricity in your body by touch the metal of the inside of the case.  It only takes as little as 10Volts to kill integrated circuits like the ones on your RAM modules, the human body can discharge amount of voltage in access of 2K Volts.

 

The PSU has a 24 pin connector which is attached to the motherboard, this needs to be removed from the motherboard.  This connector has a clip on the front side of the connector which needs to be depressed to in order to disconnect the connector from the motherboard.

 

alGl4NP.png

 

With the connector free you will need to place a jumper between the socket of the green wire (there's only the one in this bundle) and any black wire socket.  A small piece of wire or a paper clip can be used for this, just make sure the jumper isn't touching anything else.

 

With the jumper in place it's time to turn the computer on.  All you need to do is plug the power cord back into the receptacle, this will start the PSU.

 

With the PSU running you should have at least the case fan and the PSU fan running.  When the power is on use a multimeter to read the +3.3V, +5V, and +12V rail voltages.

 

Yellow +12VDC

Red +5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC

 

Readings should not have variances larger than +/- five percent.  

Maximum.........Minimum
12.6V.................11.4V
5.25V.................4.75V
3.47V.................3.14V

 

If you are able to do this and have voltages within their normal ranges the PSU should be good.

 

To restore the computer to its operational condition unplug the power cord, remove the jumper from the 24 pin connector and reattach it to the motherboard.  Plug the PSU back in and the computer can be started with the power button.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 





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