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"leaked' Intel roadmap...socket 1161 and socket 2076


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#1 MDD1963

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 06:35 AM

 

(Fast forward to 8:55 for roadmap info, 2018-2019...)

 

HIghlights- seems to imply socket 1151 is dead (no big surprise, there), but, 1161 will bring 10 nm Icelake/3200 MHz RAM standard, and, lots of 8 core offerings for mainstream, including 9600K (8c/8t, 4.1 base/4.5 turbo), and 9700K (8c/16t, 4.3base,4.7 GHz turbo), and....9750 (8c/16t, 4.5 Ghz base, 5 GHz turbo)

 

There is also a socket 2076 shown, but, you can listen/read/watch for info on the i9-8990XE 22 core which will probably retail for $2999 yourself.... :)


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#2 Drillingmachine

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 01:32 PM

Huge improvement. Now Intel adds 10 pins instead one :D

We'll see about that 8 core to mainstream thing. I'm not sure those coming so fast.

#3 MDD1963

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 05:00 PM

Naturally, a single leaked Chinese slide is probably not quite enough to plan one's Intel put and call options on or short sales just yet.... :)

 

Presumably, the new 'cheapo' i3 will be 6c/6t?

 

2018 might be interesting. (But, until the 'old' 7700K falls below 60 fps minimums or begins to struggle, 4c/8t will have to suffice)

 

I also look forward to seeing the assorted Ryzen updates forthcoming, and Ryzen 2 on 12nm and then 7 nm? Good times for everyone! 8 cores from either manufacturer turboing to 5 GHz with the best GPUs should be very nice. (It will be interesting to see this alleged 9800K/9850K pricing--knowing Intel, I'll guess 12 months out it will debut at $449 and $579, respectively; they *want* their darn $50 per core... and more!)


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#4 cat1092

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 06:32 AM

I'll also be on the watch for the end of Ryzen 2 or beginning of 3, that's when I estimate to have saved enough to build a new workhorse PC. $50/month adds up slow at first, yet over time, a wad of cash. :thumbup2:

 

Am figuring maybe 6 months post EOL of W7 & why I say Ryzen 3, the platform should be new, no need to buy outgoing chips as a main rig.. May or may not purchase a Windows license with the hardware, will decide at that time, the OS is a lot of upkeep compared to Linux Mint. :)

 

Good to see competition on both sides, one plus in AMD's favor so far are there's no changes for AM4 at this time, so MB OEM's should have their offerings fine tuned. There'll have to be constant changes for Intel MB's to keep up with all of these releases, unlike the 6th/7th gen series that would run on the same MB, chances are that they'll have to make different types for some CPU's. 

 

Also, the dies are shrinking to the point of where both AMD & Intel will have to begin looking beyond silicon, 7nm is very small. Can't see it going much further, maybe down to 5, and will be forced to explore other options. However, I don't 'get' their reasoning, seems that more transistors, diodes, whatever can be packed into a larger (say 22nm) chip rather than a tiny one. The IHS of most all of my CPU's seems to be the same size, even when the die is smaller. Therefore, what's the need to shrink dies when a lot more can be placed on larger ones?  :question:

 

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#5 Platypus

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 07:42 AM

what's the need to shrink dies when a lot more can be placed on larger ones?


The length of the data paths is is critical for both performance and thermal efficiency. A larger die increases propagation time, if the data path is twice as long, it takes the data twice as long to travel between, say, registers and cache. This sets where diminishing returns limits set in for feasible clock speeds for any given die size. Likewise for thermal efficiency, reducing the length of data paths reduces their resistance, reducing the contribution that makes to heat generation. That relationship is not a direct one, but overall, for a given circuit design, reducing its physical size with a smaller fabrication process reduces the heat output.

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#6 MadmanRB

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 09:23 AM

Yeah this is why I hate intel, I am no AMD fanboy but intels need to change the socket every 2 seconds is annoying and very anti consumer.


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#7 Drillingmachine

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 02:57 PM

I also look forward to seeing the assorted Ryzen updates forthcoming, and Ryzen 2 on 12nm and then 7 nm? Good times for everyone! 8 cores from either manufacturer turboing to 5 GHz with the best GPUs should be very nice. (It will be interesting to see this alleged 9800K/9850K pricing--knowing Intel, I'll guess 12 months out it will debut at $449 and $579, respectively; they *want* their darn $50 per core... and more!)


Ryzen 2 will be 7nm. 12nm is just tweaked 14nm, so 12nm is just marketing name. AMD has already stated Ryzen 2 will be 7nm and probably only that's holding it is 7nm tech that is likely be ready around one year or so.

Unless 7nm tech is crap, Ryzen 2 should have no problems reaching 5 GHz.

#8 MDD1963

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 03:38 PM

 

I also look forward to seeing the assorted Ryzen updates forthcoming, and Ryzen 2 on 12nm and then 7 nm? Good times for everyone! 8 cores from either manufacturer turboing to 5 GHz with the best GPUs should be very nice. (It will be interesting to see this alleged 9800K/9850K pricing--knowing Intel, I'll guess 12 months out it will debut at $449 and $579, respectively; they *want* their darn $50 per core... and more!)


Ryzen 2 will be 7nm. 12nm is just tweaked 14nm, so 12nm is just marketing name. AMD has already stated Ryzen 2 will be 7nm and probably only that's holding it is 7nm tech that is likely be ready around one year or so.

Unless 7nm tech is crap, Ryzen 2 should have no problems reaching 5 GHz.

 

 

Based on it's 4 GHz performance, that should be quite darn nice!


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#9 cat1092

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 03:49 AM

 

Unless 7nm tech is crap, Ryzen 2 should have no problems reaching 5 GHz.

 

In that case, am hoping to see a native 5GHz chip with Ryzen 3! :guitar:

 

Seems ever since the i7-4790K release, 4 GHz or a bit higher is the limit, and took some time to get past that. For all of the collective technology that both sides has, seems that one or the other could ship a 5.0Ghz chip native, with 5.5 GHz or higher Turbo speeds. Of course, we now know that's not going to happen on a quad, as both sides has shifted to 8 physical cores & beyond, other than the i3, of which the latest release is now a 4.0 GHz quad & in 13th place when it comes to speed at that. :thumbup2:

 

http://cpu.userbenchmark.com/Intel-Core-i3-8350K/Rating/3935

 

So every CPU lineup Intel has is getting a makeover & along with that, more speed than ever. However note that there was a Haswell dual core i7 with H/T that ran at a steady 3.8 Ghz, was going to purchase for my XPS 8700, then before my payday, all were sold out & relisted for $50-100 more on eBay. No, I wasn't about to pay $255 for an i3, instead, purchased the smaller of the two Devil's Canyon CPU's for $4 more & free ship, in new sealed package from a trusted eBay supplier I've done business with for years. :)

 

At any rate, am looking forward to a very fast, high GHz level Ryzen 3 chip come 2020. :thumbsup:

 

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#10 cat1092

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 03:52 AM

 

what's the need to shrink dies when a lot more can be placed on larger ones?


The length of the data paths is is critical for both performance and thermal efficiency. A larger die increases propagation time, if the data path is twice as long, it takes the data twice as long to travel between, say, registers and cache. This sets where diminishing returns limits set in for feasible clock speeds for any given die size. Likewise for thermal efficiency, reducing the length of data paths reduces their resistance, reducing the contribution that makes to heat generation. That relationship is not a direct one, but overall, for a given circuit design, reducing its physical size with a smaller fabrication process reduces the heat output.

 

 

Platypus, thanks for the explanation! :)

 

Had always been wondering the 'why' on this matter & you described in understandable terms. :thumbup2:

 

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#11 MDD1963

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 03:55 AM

Even the leaked roadmap only shows one processor 9850XE with will almost certainly be a single core turboing to 5 GHz....; I'm sure all enthused by the new psychological barrier (amongst the most modern of CPUs, anyway )will be lined up to pay $999 for such a 'boost'! :)


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#12 cat1092

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 05:22 AM

I'll take a pass on the $1,000 CPU's, there'll be many for half the price with less than 10% performance loss, mostly in single threaded operations. :thumbup2:

 

With that in mind, all of these cores available, software developers will have to make adjustments so that the apps we use the most can take advantage of more cores. Especially browsers, the #1 in Google Chrome itself brings a heavy load & could benefit with using more than a single core (or H/T in one). 

 

Would also like to see PCIe 3.0 move upwards, for myself not so much for GPU's, rather faster NVMe SSD's that'll torch those of today. Historically, every new revision has doubled the speed of the previous, so just one level up would create an entire new market for both GPU's & NVMe SSD's. :)

 

All of these newer upgrades will also mean a flood of not too old computers of all types on eBay for less than a third of the original price that'll provide models for every budget. The video quoted a high number in use that's within reason, so many could get 6th gen series at great pricing. :thumbsup:

 

Am sure that AMD isn't sitting on the sidelines, while their releases usually ships later than expected (why I became tired of waiting for Ryzen & went with a FX-8350 system), next go round will be patient & see what's placed on the table. As stated, I'd rather have a new chip coming in, rather than one on it's way out, newer are better supported & usually offers more features as well. From the looks of things now, won't be going quad anymore, true 8 core is here to stay & may become a mainstream offering in 2-3 years, dropping quads altogether on the AMD side. 

 

Intel will likely keep the i3 as a quad & needs to ditch the rest, if already haven't. I've yet to hear of a Pentium in the 8th gen lineup, hopefully won't be there. Kind of hard to envision 'dual core' & 40% extra performance in the same sentence, while a decade to 15 years back, was accurate, not so much today. Although am going to look for a low cost 4th gen Pentium that sold for $69 new (I believe unlocked) to practice delidding on. The i7-4770 that shipped with my XPS 8700 is beginning to run 7-8C warmer than when purchased in 2013. Have upgraded heatsink & cooler (& it's stock fan), along with running SpeedFan to get that drop, was 8-10C warmer with stock cooler, no matter which thermal paste I used or application method. I've found that the rice grain method is best (less is more), anymore than that, when heatsink removed, there's paste everywhere. :lol:

 

While I still love my current systems & will upkeep for as long as feasible, like to keep at least one modern PC on hand, so 2020 becomes 'new build' year, the roadmaps are looking good so far. Will be glad to see AMD shed more light on theirs, although they've learned not to make bold predictions that leaves customers unhappy. And thankfully, discontinued the FX line practice of calling quad, tri & dual core CPU's eight, six & four. Speaking of which, this Phenom x4 965 system rocks, running half the RAM that the FX-8530 system was running & I believe is a better CPU. It takes getting behind the wheel to have that feeling, if I thought it to be slower, would install in a different MB.

 

Have had a could of Intel systems I felt the same way over, one of my current PC's featuring a Intel Core2Quad 9650 was faster than a 1st gen Core i7-920 system that I gave to a friend in need three holiday seasons back. He was unemployed through no fault of his own, his daughter needed a computer for homework & for him to look for a job, so it felt as good for me to part with the PC as them for receiving it. :)

 

2020 cannot come fast enough for me, and at my age, won't be long. :P

 

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Edited by cat1092, 09 October 2017 - 05:22 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 MDD1963

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 06:45 AM

"I'll take a pass on the $1,000 CPU's, there'll be many for half the price with less than 10% performance loss"

 

Ditto, kind of like pricing LED TVs; 80" on sale for $2500, $75" on sale for $1300... :)


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