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Trying to move HD from one laptop to another, but stuck in Windows Repair loop.


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#1 chromecarz00

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 01:22 AM

Both are the same model, Lenovo X230 T, the one I'm trying to move is a windows 10 and just sticks me in the boot loop.

 

Any advice?



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 09:13 AM

Well, since Windows 10 licensing is linked directly to the motherboard in the machine you may be having problems if the machine into which the drive with Windows 10 is being transplanted has never had a legally licensed and activated copy of Windows 10 on it.

 

That would be my first guess.


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#3 dc3

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 10:23 AM

Why are you trying to install this hdd in the other laptop?  

 

Here is where the problem begins.  Both of these computers have OEM Windows installed on them.  You can not take a OEM version of Windows and install it in another computer.  As Brian pointed out the operating system is tied to the motherboard.  Unless both laptops have the exact same version of the motherboard the hdd would need to be generalized in order to install it in a different version.  One of the last steps in installing the operating system Windows searches and locates the drivers necessary to boot into the operating system.  If these motherboards are different those drivers will not work on another version of this motherboard. 

 

Even it you could get the computer to boot from the other hdd you probably wouldn't be able to activate it.

 

Are both of these laptops running Windows 10?  If one is not but is running 7 or 8.1 you can still upgrade to Windows 10 with the Assistive Technologies version.  Assistive technology is an umbrella term that includes assistive, adaptive, and rehabilitative devices for people with disabilities, this is suggested for those using assistive technologies.  Microsoft has not required any proof of the use of these devices, so it is pretty much available to anyone.


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#4 chromecarz00

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 03:57 PM

My old laptop's fan, fingerprint chip and some other issues died. The fan on these things is a bit of a pain to change, and my buddy had this computer as a spare.

 

The other computer is running Windows 7, so I could do the upgrade but I have a bunch of software (some legit, some not, some i dont know lol) that I would love to not lose. The motherboard should be the same as the computers are the same though, no? 

 

When I go into command prompt from the advanced section, it reads from the X drive instead of the C drive. Could that be part of the issue? 

 

Any way around this you could see? Installing correct drivers, etc? 



#5 britechguy

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 04:10 PM

It isn't an issue of the motherboards being the same or not (though the same machine can use slightly different versions of a given motherboard during production) but that Windows 10 licensing is tied directly to the serial number (or some unique identifier) of the motherboard on the machine on which it was installed.

 

This identifier is unique to each motherboard, even if they're the exact same motherboard.

 

Microsoft can grant exceptions to this if a motherboard is replaced, and this might fall under that broad category, but you'd have to work that out with Microsoft customer support to see if they'll allow you to transplant your drive into another computer that's the exact model, sans hard drive, that you're using as a quick way to get around several different hardware failures on the original box.

 

Unless Microsoft allows it you would have to upgrade the machine then reinstall the software and get your user files copied over from your old drive.

 

There is no truly easy option here.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

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#6 dc3

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 08:52 AM

The upgrade I suggested will not effect your personal files or third party programs.  I would suggest doing the upgrade on the hdd in the computer that your have Windows 7 installed on.  As for your illegal programs, Bleeping Computer has a forum rule you should be aware of. 

 

No subject matter will be allowed whose purpose is to defeat existing copyright or security measures. If a user persists and/or the activity is obviously illegal the staff reserves the right to remove such content and/or ban the user. This would also mean encouraging the use or continued use of pirated software is not permitted, and subject to the same consequences.

 

As you can see Bleeping Computer takes a strong stance on this issue.  I would refrain from discussing your illegal programs.  I feel the same, for that reason this will be my last post in this topic.


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#7 britechguy

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 10:46 AM

The reason this thread is important, though, is to clearly communicate that the old paradigm where you could pull a hard drive with an installation of Windows (up through Windows 7, at least) on it and transplant that drive into another piece of identical hardware and have it run correctly is now dead.

 

I did this once a very long time ago with a Windows XP laptop where there was a major hardware failure on the original box and a very cheap "body" of another that had had a hard drive failure was offered for sale for a song.   It was very handy to be able to do that kind of "heart transplant" on the very rare occasion that it might be needed.

 

Now that the licensing scheme for Windows 10 is tied directly to the unique identifier from the motherboard on the machine on which it was installed, you can no longer take a hard drive from one machine, entirely legally licensed with Windows 10, and transplant it into precisely the same hardware configuration and have it work if there is a different motherboard involved.  Or at least you can't without getting Microsoft involved to allow it to "re-license."

 

Since motherboard replacements are exceedingly rare on the whole the new licensing scheme used by Windows 10 is quite reasonable, but if you do have a motherboard failure and need to replace the motherboard in a given machine they do have mechanisms in place that will allow you to do that, they just require human intervention on Microsoft's part (and, of course, the affected owner's, too).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 





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