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Unable to partition more than 50% of my C: drive


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#1 richierein

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 10:16 AM

I am trying to partition my C; drive on a new computer so that 20% of the drive is my primary partition.  There is some allocated space in the center of the drive and I am unable to shrink the C: to drive in this manner.  Can someone offer a suggestion?



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 10:25 AM

What tool are you using to try to do the rearranging?

 

There are a number of free (for home use) third-party tools like EaseUS Partition Master Free or MiniTool Partition Wizard Free that allow you to shift around existing partitions.

 

If that allocated space is a partition of its own you could move it to "the end" of the drive and then repartition the remaining free space as you wish.


Edited by britechguy, 03 October 2017 - 10:33 AM.
Added links for third party partition tools

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

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#3 Platypus

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 10:30 AM

Assuming it is an NTFS volume, the Master File Table starts around 15% of the way into the drive, and will have a fair amount of protected space for expansion. 20% would therefore likely be too small for the minimum size a partition could be shrunk to.


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#4 richierein

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 11:56 AM

I am afraid to use third party software because during the shrinking and formatting of the new partition it will wipe out the unknown file/folder in the middle of the drive.  This may result in lose of Windows functionality.. Other new computers I have seen recently have allowed the full shrinking.  there has been no allocated sectors in the middle of the c:/ drive.  It appears to be a defect in the initial factory installation of Windows. 



#5 britechguy

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 12:33 PM

It is not likely that any Microsoft or third-party partitioning tool will wipe out anything that you don't direct it to wipe out.

 

It would be much easier to help you were you to post a screen shot from whatever it is you are trying to use to repartition so that those of us who are trying to help are not having to guess what, precisely, it is that you are trying to describe.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

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#6 richierein

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 01:13 PM

Here is the screen shot:

 

 

post-639667-0-65305600-1507054192_thumb.

Attached Files



#7 britechguy

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 01:18 PM

Thanks for that, but what I'm looking for is the partition representation that I can see the tiniest sliver of peeking out from behind it.

 

Knowing how the whole drive is currently laid out and how it is allocated (or parts unallocated) is the starting point.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

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#8 richierein

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 01:33 PM

here it is

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#9 britechguy

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 03:06 PM

Still not useful.  The fragmentation state of your drive has nothing to do with how it's partitioned.

 

Please try:

 

  1. Control Panel
  2. Administrative Tools
  3. Computer Management
  4. Disk Management under Storage in the tree view on the left side of the Computer Management window.
     
    You should have a screen that looks like this:
    Attached File  Win10_CptMgt_DiskMgt.jpg   103.07KB   0 downloads
     
     
    Disc 0 should be the hard disk drive (or solid state disk) that contains a partition for C: and the C: partition holds Windows.  You can see on my machine there are 5 partitions on Disc 0, the third of which is my C: drive.
     
    Disc 2 is my external backup drive, which happens to be plugged in right now.
     
    What is needed here is the partition layout of your drive(s) and the above method is how you get it.
     
     

 


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

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#10 richierein

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 03:32 PM

I am sorry...here is the snapshot you wanted

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#11 britechguy

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 04:07 PM

At this point I'm still at a loss as to what you are wanting to do.  I don't understand what you're trying to say in the title of this topic, as you're wide open as to how you could reconfigure the space taken up by C: at present.

 

Your drive looks perfectly fine.  Your C: drive is virtually empty so if you wished you could shrink the partition size for C: down to, say, 200 GB which is a hair more than 20% of the total size of the current C: partition, unallocating the remainder, allowing C: to be strictly for Windows and installed programs.  Then you could take that unallocated remainder and create a partition from it, assigning it a drive letter other than A, B, C, or D (and, if you have an optical drive, probably E).  Of course, if you do this you also then need to tell Windows that your user folders and libraries need to be permanently moved to the new drive.  It's been so long since I last did that that I've forgotten the details and would have to do a web search on the steps.

 

Of course, any time one is thinking about repartitioning a full system image backup as well as a separate user data backup should be taken before doing so.  I haven't had an issue with repartitioning in many, many moons but if it fails, and you don't have backups, things get very ugly very quickly.

 

I far prefer third party tools for repartitioning because they're more user friendly and will allow you to take a look at how what you are doing will look once done.  Most do not actually do anything until you give the final go, but can give you a preview of how what you propose to do will turn out.  They also catch you if you try to shrink something "too small" for what's on it or expand beyond space available.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#12 richierein

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 06:04 PM

Thank you for all your attention.....

However,as teh first screenshot shows, Windows won't allow me to shrink to 800 gb.  I will only allopw me to shrink c:\/ to  468gb.  It is because of the two sectors in the middle of the hdd that are immovable with optimizing..  I t seems that this is a factory defect in the install of windows.  I have never seen a hdd that can't be shrunk to it's full empty space. Or at least 800gb.

 

Should I return the computer?



#13 britechguy

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 06:15 PM

I would strongly suggest you try using one of the two third party products I've previously mentioned for repartitioning.

 

With a wide open drive like you have I have yet to see either one of them fail.  As much as I try to encourage the use of built-in Windows utilities this is one of those times where I don't.  I have seen people use Linux on bootable media to do repartioning but that would be my very last resort (simply because I'm not comfortable with it, not because it doesn't work).

 

Others will have to chime in at this point as I am out of ideas.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 





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