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Windows Update Managed by Your System Administrator


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#1 JazzMahn

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 06:58 PM

I am helping a friend that brought me a Windows 7 Enterprise Laptop.  It had several different virus programs installed and were all trying to run at the same time.

 

I cleaned the computer and after deleting the virus programs, I installed Microsoft Security Essentials for Windows 7.  It installed, updated, and ran a full scan.  The computer is clean. 

 

I installed Malawarebytes, updated, and ran a full scan.  It did find several threatware which I removed.  I installed Ccleaner and it found over 6,000 plus megs of junk ware which I removed.  The computer seems to be running well but I do have a question.

 

When I go to Windows Update, it says that Windows has no updates but I also see that it has a message "Windows Update is managed by your System Administrator"  There is also one that says Windows Update is managed by Microsoft.   

 

Is this a problem.  I am also seeing that Windows Firewall can't be updated because it is being controlled by Group Policy.

 

If anyone can tell me what else I can do to clean up this computer I would sure appreciate it.

 

Thanks,

 

Steve Bell

Carmi, Illinois



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#2 JazzMahn

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 07:01 PM

I could do a complete install of this Windows 7 Home edition but wouldn't the Enterprise Edition of Windows 7 still be maintained in upper memory and stop the computer from updating the Windows Firewall and Windows update from being updated through proper Microsoft Channels.



#3 joseibarra

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 12:59 AM

What is the origin of the laptop with Windows 7 Enterprise - acquired from a business perhaps?

 

Windows 7 Enterprise is for business environments and needs to communicate at least every 180 days with a local KMS (Key Management Service) on another computer or it will become deactivated (not genuine).  Of course there are on the Internet hacks and pirated product keys that should be considered illegal that might allow you to get around the activation problems.

 

The Windows update messages like these (and other messages about "...by your system administrator"):

 

[attachment=198385:1.jpg]

 

[attachment=198386:2.jpg]

 

 

Messages like that are Group Policy messages that if the system came from a business may have been applied to all systems in the business or sometimes those policies can be applied by some AV programs and sometimes by malicious software.

 

Here is a link to a nice discussion in the Microsoft community about how to "fix" the Windows Update issue:

 

Windows Update - How to fix "Some settings are managed by your system administrator

 

The company may have also applied a policy to prevent the Windows firewall from working in favor of their own firewall.  If your firewall also has a Group Policy applied you could fix that too (depending on what the error message says) but who knows what else on that system is going to be a problem for you to fix in the future - things you haven't found out about yet.  What other policies have been applied?

 

If the laptop was originally store bought and came with Windows preinstalled and not part of a business enterprise the Microsoft COA (Certificate of Authenticity) sticker should tell you what edition of Windows came with the laptop (Home, Pro, etc.) and the 25 character product key and you could perform a clean install of that edition of Windows and activate that without a problem.

 

At least with a clean install you will know what you have and not have to worry about policies or whatever other things may be on that system.


Edited by joseibarra, 30 September 2017 - 01:01 AM.

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#4 joseibarra

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 07:56 AM

I found an example today in the Microsoft community of what will happen (sooner or later) on your Windows Enterprise installation if it is no longer able to handshake with the usually corporate KMS Server.

 

It could be that some work has gifted or sold a computer and left the Windows Enterprise installed but the system is no longer on the corporate network.

 

The user says his Windows installation that was running fine is now not genuine and attempts to reactivate keep failing and now what to do about it?

 

Running the Microsoft Genuine Advantage tool from here:

 

Download Micrsoft MGADiag

 

Then analyzing the report we can see why:

 

Validation Code: 0
Cached Online Validation Code: N/A, hr = 0xc004f012
Windows Product Key: *****-*****-2VJC9-XBBR8-HVTHH         (a valid KMS Client Setup key)
Windows Product Key Hash: k/l/EMDQdwK9OvdCkPtHG1YdosE=
Windows Product ID: 00392-918-5000002-85696
Windows Product ID Type: 1
Windows License Type: KMS Client
Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010100.1.0.004
ID: {B2636F17-527E-45AC-99AA-DB2B3F59B97F}(1)
Is Admin: Yes
TestCab: 0x0
LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
Product Name: Windows 7 Enterprise
Architecture: 0x00000009
Build lab: 7601.win7sp1_ldr.161007-0600
TTS Error: 
Validation Diagnostic: 
Resolution Status: N/A

.

.

.

Name: Windows® 7, Enterprise edition
Description: Windows Operating System - Windows® 7, VOLUME_KMSCLIENT channel
Activation ID: ae2ee509-1b34-41c0-acb7-6d4650168915
Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
Extended PID: 00392-00170-918-500000-03-1033-7601.0000-1132016
Installation ID: 004121585363070872334546808575324303899274403263774901
Partial Product Key: HVTHH
License Status: Additional grace period (KMS license expired or hardware out of tolerance)
Time remaining: 14460 minute(s) (10 day(s))
Remaining Windows rearm count: 2
Trusted time: 9/30/2017 1:52:13 PM

 

 

So if your friend has not picked some illegal activation key off the Internet that Windows installation is going to suffer the same fate some day.

 

 

 


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#5 sflatechguy

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 01:22 PM

Undoubtedly this computer was part of an Active Directory domain, which means Group Policy settings are being applied to both Windows Updates and the firewall settings. That's why you are getting the "Windows Update is managed by your System Administrator" message. There are registry "fixes" for some of the Windows Update and firewall settings, but Bleeping Computer doesn't endorse overriding settings configured by company policies and administrators.

 

Provided this person obtained this computer legitimately, you could use something like GParted to completely wipe the hard drive and then install Windows 7 Home. That will remove any Windows 7 Enterprise configurations and binaries. However, you can't use the Windows 7 Enterprise activation key to install it. You will need a valid Windows 7 Home edition key. That's probably your best option.






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