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Computer will turn on but does not beep and no display.


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#1 ncisprobie

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 06:45 PM

Hello my computer crapped out on last night. I don't know what will be relevant so it will be long. Here it goes.

 

I have been having difficulty with my wireless mouse (I don't need guidance for this part it is for back round info) so I first tied moving to a different USB (both in the front) a new port (first shutting down the computer, moving the receiver to the new port and turn on the computer). Still had an issue I tried moving it again I decide to move it to the back where I found all the vents caked with dust. I thought well I will just open it up and vacuum it out (which I have done to many computers before.) Before I did that I try uninstalling and reinstalling the mouse divers. I shut the computer down put the receiver back in the first port and restart the computer. At this point when I turned it back on my keyboard wasn't working. Frustrated I deiced to move on to the easier task of vacuuming the computer out. I disconnected the monitor, flipped the switch on the psu, disconnected power cord and ethernet cable. open the case and vacuumed it out. I contented every thing back went to turn it on there was no beep (which if I remember correctly mean it is not posting) and the display did not come on (I use a element 48 inch tv as monitor). turned it off moved the where I had the HDMI plugged at same thing. I try a different cord nothing. I then tried unplugging everything from the motherboard except the motherboard power cables, 1 stick of ram, graphics card, cpu fan(no usb devices, headers drives or anything), remove the cmos battery, move the bios reset jumper to pins 2+3 for 10 seconds then move the jumper back to pins 1+2, put the battery back in. plug the power cord in and power up it. nothing. I am not sure of a next step. Not sure if it motherboard, graphics card, or both or something even more. I don't have another computer to test things on. Any and all help is appreciated. 

I am running Windows 10 Pro 64-bit os version 1607, Processor Intel Core i5 cpu 650 @3.20Hz 12 Gb RAM, HD 465GB, motherboard is Asus P7P550 Pro, graphics card  ASUS EN210 SILENT/DI/1GD3/V2(LP) GeForce 210 1GB 64-Bit DDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16



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#2 managel

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 02:51 AM

It would be nice to read problems written in paragraphs. It's difficult to read one big blob of text. 

 

No display could be due to many reasons. Graphic card problem, ram problem or mobo socket problem. 

 

Since you don't have another system I guess you will have to take it to a technician.

 

I think your model of mobo does have built in display card.  So, you can't test if graphics card is broken. 


Edited by managel, 30 September 2017 - 02:52 AM.


#3 mjd420nova

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 11:27 AM

Dust has a nasty way of getting into places that don't get cleaned well.  Enough dust starts shorting things out, circuits near air entry points (USB ports, monitor, keyboard ports) will exhibit problems.  In some cases, shorts at one USB port can disable the whole array if multiports exist.  It will cake on any heat sink and vent, fan blades and support members.  Even MOBO cable connectors and plugin slots are vulnerable, especially the unused ones.



#4 dc3

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 10:48 AM

Dust has a nasty way of getting into places that don't get cleaned well.  Enough dust starts shorting things out, circuits near air entry points (USB ports, monitor, keyboard ports) will exhibit problems.  In some cases, shorts at one USB port can disable the whole array if multiports exist.  It will cake on any heat sink and vent, fan blades and support members.  Even MOBO cable connectors and plugin slots are vulnerable, especially the unused ones.

The type of dust which accumulates inside a computer is household dust which usually contains human and pet skin and dander, pollen, fabric from carpets, dirt tracked in from outside. Because of its composition It's usually non-conductive. 


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#5 mjd420nova

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 03:44 PM

Accumulations don't take much to pick up moisture from a change in humidity and then you get intermittent faults that seem unrelated.  Seen it happen.  I use a combination of canned air, a vacuum with a grounded tip and a one inch paint brush with the bristles cut to 1 1/2 to 2 inches long.  Dust has a way of getting under those surface mounted devices and the brush and air will remove that.  Working with the vacuum and air, cleaning all surfaces.  Fans and heatsinks need special attention as they spread any dust around.



#6 dc3

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 09:42 AM

Using a vacuum cleaner to clean out dust is a bad idea, grounded tip or not vacuum cleaners are great static electricity generators.  Unless the vacuum cleaner is specifically designed for cleaning computers such as those found here it should not be used to clean a computer.  It only takes a 10V discharge to kill board components, such as the integrated circuits on your RAM modules.  Just to put this into perspective, the human body can generate a static electricity discharge in access of 2kV.  That is the voltage necessary to generate the pain level one experiences when they are shocked in the process of touching something metal in the winter.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#7 dc3

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 09:53 AM

@ncisprobie

 

It sounds like the initial problem was overheating, but when you mucked about inside the case you dislodged or disconnected at least one component.  You need to open the case, touch the metal of the case to discharge any static electricity in your body, then check all of your connections.  Reseat all of your cards (RAM, GPU, Sound card, etc.), and check all of your power and data cable connections.


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#8 Joe C

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 12:02 PM

Does sound like the vacuum cleaner killed the board with a static discharge



#9 dc3

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 12:37 PM

Does sound like the vacuum cleaner killed the board with a static discharge


That is one of the possibilities, but it's too early to make that diagnosis.  There is still the good possibility that the original poster accidentally disconnected something while they were messing around inside the case.  There's even the possibility that there was a static discharge from the original poster to component/s inside the case.


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#10 mjd420nova

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 04:30 PM

I worked in a standard lab and found even the devices made to do the job anti-static wise were not as good as wrapping the tip and a small edge inside the nozzle with foil  and grounded actually worked better.  We used a standard ESD device you'd use to test ground mats and working areas.  Many try to use compressed air but that just wets everything down unless you have a real good compressor  with a water removal system, it will do more damage than good.



#11 Joe C

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 07:35 PM

I worked in a standard lab and found even the devices made to do the job anti-static wise were not as good as wrapping the tip and a small edge inside the nozzle with foil  and grounded actually worked better.  We used a standard ESD device you'd use to test ground mats and working areas.  Many try to use compressed air but that just wets everything down unless you have a real good compressor  with a water removal system, it will do more damage than good.

Any decent and even some cheap ones do have a valve on the bottom of the tank to drain off water, which is what your supposed to do after each use



#12 dc3

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 11:31 AM

First off, you should not use a compressor to blow out the computer.  Not only produce static electricity it blows mist to wet air even with a dry filter.  Another problem is that if you don't turn the pressure way down you can cause damage to some fragile board components.  The best way to blow out the computer is with a canned Duster.  This contains a noble gas which will not create static electricity.  You need to remember to hold the can upright, if you don't you will eventually spray liquid.


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#13 Joe C

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 01:18 PM

First off, you should not use a compressor to blow out the computer.  Not only produce static electricity it blows mist to wet air even with a dry filter.  Another problem is that if you don't turn the pressure way down you can cause damage to some fragile board components.  The best way to blow out the computer is with a canned Duster.  This contains a noble gas which will not create static electricity.  You need to remember to hold the can upright, if you don't you will eventually spray liquid.

I can tell you haven't cleaned out very many pc's or laptops have ya?

 

Instead of posting our opinions on the better way to clean out dust from a pc, let's see if someone can tell the OP how to fix his pc


Edited by Joe C, 03 October 2017 - 01:22 PM.


#14 dc3

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 02:48 PM

Joe... you don't know squat about me or my background.  Your statement borders on being inflammatory.  


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#15 mjd420nova

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 06:06 PM

It's something I see almost everyday.  A laptop, a desktop on the floor, a satellite earth station or a customer service kiosk.  The junk that gets into these units is beyond comprehension.  Even with filters in place, I find thread, yarn(some pieces up to a foot long), bugs, paper and pet hair( cat and dog and once a feather).  I started my career in the vacuum tube days so can attest to having cleaned more then a few machines of every type.  Got to use a vacuum?.  even some of the toner clean up types will generate a lot of static at that tip of the nozzle.  Professional nozzle models will have a built in conductive strip at the tip with a pigtail at the base for grounding.   Canned air can be hazardous to the hardware if the can gets turned on its side and it ejects the propellant liquid as it is VERY cold and will  create condensation where ever frost is created.  Now it's mud not dust you have to clean.






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