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64-Bit Processor but 32-bit Windows 10, huh?


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#1 britechguy

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 11:59 AM

This is one that has me stumped and I'm more interested in knowing (or getting theories) on exactly how this came to pass rather than how to upgrade to 64-bit (which is perfectly fine if it can be done for free).

 

I have a very old Gateway desktop that has an Intel Pentium E2200 processor, which is 64-bit.  The machine was upgraded from Windows 7 Ultimate to Windows 10 Pro during the free upgrade period.

 

I failed to believe that the original Windows 7 was 32-bit, but now believe it must have been as there is no other logical reason that I'd have Win10 Pro 32-bit running on this machine now.

 

For those who know "ancient history" in the hardware and brand worlds, did Gateway install 32-bit versions of Windows on systems that had 64-bit processors as a cost saving measure?   Is there any other logical explanation as to how I'd have a 32-bit version of Win10 now?

 

None of this is a crisis, but I'm surprised that I'd never noticed that I have an x64 processor in that box prior to this morning as I'd always presumed 32-bit because of the OS.  I inherited the machine and didn't purchase it and it exists purely as a "desperation backup" in the household.

 


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 01:09 PM

I know Windows 10 will be 32 bit if Windows 7 was 32bit. I don't believe you can upgrade to Windows 10 64bit if the OS is 32 bit. Perhaps Ultimate was installed later. I don't recall any OEM putting Windows 7  Ultimate on their computer. Is there a COA sticker on the computer showing the installed OS?



#3 britechguy

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 03:13 PM

John,

 

          I'll have to look.  I did forget to add the detail that I did the upgrade way back when to Win7 Ultimate.  I think the machine came with Win7 Home.  It's certain to have the OEM sticker on the back.   I'll have to look.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#4 Guest_philbo_*

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 07:09 PM

I have an old HP laptop that came with 32-bit Windows 7. Whenever I changed the OS (Linux, Windows 8.1), I always chose 32-bit. And during the free upgrade, it upgraded to 32-bit Windows 10.
 
I eventually realised that it actually had a 64-bit processor, so since then I've only installed 64-bit OSes - including Windows 10 64-bit, which installed and activated with no problems.


#5 Platypus

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 10:24 PM

Older systems were likely to have 32 bit Windows installed, mainly during the transition period when 64 bit was "high end", since not all systems had or could support over 4GB of RAM. Supplying 32 bit Windows avoided the remaining compatibility problems while not all hardware manufacturers provided 64 bit drivers. Also a lot of older but widely used 32 bit software still used 16 bit installers, so could not be (easily) installed under WOW64 since it lacks 16 bit support, even though Win64 could run the software itself.

Edited by Platypus, 28 September 2017 - 10:31 PM.

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#6 RedneckPCtech

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 11:29 AM

Older Windows Vista and Windows 7 machines shipped with Windows 32-bit to maintain its compatibility with 16-bit applications. Also the fact is most of the low end machines at the time shipped with 4GB of RAM at the most, so there is no real purpose to install 64-bit Windows on it other than the CPU supporting it when PAE capable 32-bit fit the bill for that low amount of RAM. When machines with 8GB started becoming more common as an upgrade option from 4GB models, that's when OEM's switched to 64-bit.



#7 RedneckPCtech

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 11:34 AM

 

I have an old HP laptop that came with 32-bit Windows 7. Whenever I changed the OS (Linux, Windows 8.1), I always chose 32-bit. And during the free upgrade, it upgraded to 32-bit Windows 10.
 
I eventually realised that it actually had a 64-bit processor, so since then I've only installed 64-bit OSes - including Windows 10 64-bit, which installed and activated with no problems.

 

 

And if you ever upgrade it to 8GB of RAM if you haven't done so already, the computer will be able to more readily use the extra RAM.






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