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Which programs run periodically to detect all kind of malware?


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#1 Dirkk

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 01:36 AM

Which programs should be run periodically to detect all kind of malware?

 

Malwarebytes?

SUPERAntiSpyware?

AdwCleaner?


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#2 Umbra

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 08:06 AM

Which programs should be run periodically to detect all kind of malware?

 

Malwarebytes?

SUPERAntiSpyware?

AdwCleaner?

Those are good, to answers your question , it all depends on your "paranoia level" and your safe (or not) computing habits.

 

Personally i trust my main real-time AV for detecting threats, then occasionally run some free on-demand scanners like Emsiosft Emergency Kit, Zemana AM, HitmanPro,etc...

Those i mentioned are not real-time, so used only when needed, hence not eating resources like some others do.

 

You can collect and use any On-Demand scanners as you wish, however don't use more than 1 full-fledge AV at same time, if not you risk creating conflicts.



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#3 Dirkk

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 08:25 AM

Well, paranoia level very high, safe computing habits are not available.

 

You can collect and use any On-Demand scanners as you wish

Alright, that is what I will do, so I will periodically use the on demand scanners you mention, once a week or so, I guess, thank you.

 

Personally i trust my main real-time AV for detecting threats

I often run Malwarebytes but now I ran AdWareCleaner of Malwarebytes and it found malware Malwarbyte didn't find. And Win Defender didn't find anything as well.

 

Many thanks


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#4 britechguy

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 11:38 AM

Several things:

 

1.  Different security programs scan for different things by definition, although there can be some overlap.  Viruses are pretty much in a class by themselves and that's what anti-virus addresses.  Although one can certainly broadly think of viruses as a form of malware that's not really what the software does.  The same is true of anti-malware software:  it does not scan for viruses.   Mind you, there are many combination products/security suites that do both.  Windows Defender as implemented on Windows 8 and 10 does both.

 

2.  What any given scanner finds is going to be directly related to the definitions at hand and it's own code for handling "fuzzy" situations.  When viruses or malware are truly brand, spankin' new it is entirely possible for a scanner to miss them if the definitions are not yet updated since that specific type of virus/malware has not yet been reported and the updated definitions pushed out.

 

3.  You need to pay attention to what's being found.  A great many products are, in my opinion, make people become far too paranoid because they report things like cookies and PUPs (potentially unwanted programs) that really are not problematic.   If you browse the web you will have cookie creation and not every PUP is an unwanted program (hence the "Potentially" part).  You need to take a quick look at those sorts of results and see if there's anything that's really concerning or not.  Cookies from websites you routinely visit, or have visited recently, are of no concern.  You can delete them or leave them, your choice.   Certain things reported as PUPs are actually programs you want and, if that's the case and you know it, you should add an exception to your scanner so it will not keep reporting the thing you know is not unwanted and that has not posed an issue for you.

 

Excessive paranoia is, truly, not helpful.  I've seen it make people either paralyzed or making mistakes that they shouldn't make because they're acting on baseless fear rather than informed caution.

 

Also, it is a complete mistake to ever say, "Safe computing habits are not available."   The vast majority of safe computing habits come from where you choose to venture in cyberspace and what you do when you're there.   If you exercise even reasonable caution you are quite unlikely to get an infection of any sort.  Our own quietman7 outlines the Best Practices for Safe Computing  and What you must understand regarding computer security.   If you even follow half of what he recommends you're light years ahead in terms of protecting your own security.  And protecting your own security always comes down to you and your choices, first and foremost.


Edited by britechguy, 26 September 2017 - 11:42 AM.

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#5 Dirkk

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 12:06 PM

Many thanks, Brian.

 

So Defender is a good, usable program and above all it is extremely unobtrusive compared to other antvir programs like AntiVir, Avast. So there is no need to look for another one with much effort.

 

Yes, I have to train some safe habits, I guess.Thank you for the links, too...well, actually I do already have some safe habits as I can see reading the "Best practices...", it is not that bad. But - :step9: Don't disable UAC - really is a problem, it it so anoying to each time click the OK button a program starts manually or by the autostart, I cannot stand it, so I completely disabled the UAC.

 

Many thanks again


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#6 quietman7

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 03:47 PM

There is no hard and fast or universal rule for how often to perform a scan or what security tools to scan with since such activity varies with each individual.

I can tell you that in most cases when performing routine security checks, only a Quick Scan is needed to check the areas of your computer (folders/files most) likely to contain malware...the most prevalent places where malware hides. In fact, most anti-virus and anti-malware advise a Quick Scan is the recommended scanning option. Generally, a Full Scan is only necessary when your system is heavily infected...showing obvious indications (signs of infection and malware symptoms) that something is wrong.

A Quick Scan can be performed performed at least once a week but doing them daily or every couple days is not uncommon for security minded users. Running a daily or weekly Full scan is not really a problem (or necessary) but it is time consuming and excessive. Security scans are disk and processor intensive and will raise the temperature of the computer while scanning. Although the drive should not suffer from such over-usage, it is doing a lot of unnecessary disk access that isn't needed. Since security tools with real-time protection are always on, a Full Scan is generally used to look for anything that may have been missed by that feature. Most Full Scans can be scheduled to run late at night when not using the computer so you can perform a weekly or monthly scan without having to monitor it.
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#7 Dirkk

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 04:17 PM

Thank you very much! For the links as well.

 

Very good clues. Yes, I usually only do quick scans with Malwarebytes, SuperAntiMalware lasing only some minutes each.

 

Although the drive should not suffer from such over-usage, it is doing a lot of unnecessary disk access that isn't needed

Yes, and that is even more the case with SSDs I could imagine.

 

Many thanks again


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#8 quietman7

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 04:35 PM

Not a problem.

 

For others reading this topic...the Quick Scan in Malwarebytes was renamed to Threat Scan some time ago.


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