Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

What upgrades would benefit my current build (MASSIVELY)


  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#16 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,163 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 19 September 2017 - 03:49 PM

Cool, I mean you might have been fine with what you had and got the GPU and the SSD but I know that this is hardware you would probably like to keep for now and dont want your hardware to be fried by a bad power supply.

You are adding in new parts though so for the sake of safety its a good idea.

I mean really installing the power supply is a good start in learning how to make your own build in the future if you wanted to go that route.

Installing the PSU and the front panel connectors are the only real hard parts to any build as installing ram and even the processor is dead easy as is installing a new hard drive and the motherboard.

I am a very "better safe than sorry" person, the PSU is very overlooked by many.

From here the next logical thing is the SSD but we will worry about that later.

The GPU can wait as it will only help in gaming.


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#17 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 20 September 2017 - 11:26 AM

 

Yeah I would get that taken care of, Ace seems to have a very bad reputation.

I mean its nice that its lasted this long if its the power supply you chose for your build but never know if its capacitors will blow.

I know its another cost but I would factor it in as something to do for your computer. you can ignore the GPU and for now get a SSD or the PSU.

I just dont want anything to happen to your hardware as again you can sell it, suere you will need another PSU if you make another build but its better to sell it with a good PSU than a potential ticking time bomb.

 Duely noted, i'll get right to that, this wasn't my build i actually bought it like this, so I hope its not too hard to change!

 

 

Swapping a PSU isn't that hard, especially if a modular one is purchased, this helps to eliminate cable clutter. :)

 

When installing the new cables, first a warning, don't attempt to reuse the old already installed, use only those which ships with the PSU, to include the supplied AC power cable, may have a lower gauge (thicker) internal wire than what's in use, the one currently used my appear the same, yey may have a thinner wire. Once the unit is installed, check it out. Begin by installing the cables coming from the back first, that way you won't have to unplug these later to install others. Plan the install, you'll come out better. If there's two optical drive bays, install the DVD burner (if installed) to the lower slot, this allows one to stash extra length cables at the top. If the door behind the MB is removeable & there's ample space, even better, these cases allows one to route cables to come out where needed & some has one or two SSD bays right behind the MB.

 

Like MadmanRB stated, cheap out on anything other than the PSU, it's the most important component of any build, inferior units often takes a lot more than the PSU when they blow, in extreme cases, has been known to cause fires. My PC, as well as my belongings & life if asleep, is far worth the cost of a quality PSU. While Gold rated is often the best, there's also some good Bronze rated models, just depends on OEM I've been using EVGA PSU's since 2015 & haven't purchased another brand since (three Gold & two Bronze), although prior to these, purchased a Seasonic 620W Bronze model that's also performed well. 

 

While I know there's other quality brands to choose from, you can safely add EVGA & Seasonic to the list of preferred GPU's, provided these are Bronze rated or higher. Most all OEM's has some type of value model PSU, usually low wattage (400W or less), mark these off the list. :)

 

One of the reasons why I like EVGA is they have powerful, yet small PSU's to fit in mini tower cases (150x150mm), these can be either Bronze or Gold rated (B3 or G3), three of mine are of this type at 550W, for my usage, plenty enough power. Normally, there's no need to go with very high wattage PSU's (1,000W or higher) unless two or more GPU's are being used, these are overkill for a system with one CPU & one GPU, usually a 650-750W PSU are all that's needed & the latter may be pushing it, although gives a margin of safety. :)

 

Finally, a SSD will increase performance greatly at a low cost. We used to say the same in regards to RAM, since pricing has risen & 16GB is now the 'sweet spot' (many OEM units may ship with 12GB), no need to go to 32GB unless needed for a specific reason or bragging rights (my reason). You have plenty of data drives, can add a 250-256GB SSD at a reasonable cost, as low as $89.99 (US Dollars). In fact, am getting another myself, a Crucial model that has MLC technology that's superior over TLC, and has a SLC boost. Not that I have a home for it at the time......will probably upgrade one of my older ones & reuse in one of my SATA-2 notebooks. Already have one 240GB NVMe SSD stashed in my safe for later use when needed. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#18 mitcheyfex

mitcheyfex
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 82 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:41 PM

Posted 20 September 2017 - 11:42 AM

Hey Cat!

So basically dont use any of the old cables, and only the ones supplied with the PSU I take it the PSU will include all the wires and cables i need? Also would you mind looking at the PSU Madman recommended and my Speccy link to confirm if this would be adequete? You mentioned "usually a 650-750W PSU are all that's needed & the latter may be pushing it" The one i'm looking at kindly recommended by Madman i believe is 550w would this still be okay? Not sure what i'm looking for in regards to "removable doors", but i know there are removable bays at the front of my case where my HDDS and my DVD-Rom usually sits (2 i believe!) but thats at the front of the pc above the power button and not at the back of the mb.
 
 
Thanks for your help and interest in this thread! Cannot wait to get my PSU installed and report back im definetly 100% toying with the idea of getting a SSD im just unsure what size to get, you mentioned the sweet spot being 16gb, do the lower memory SSD's perform better? i'd probably want a bigger one with more memory seems pointless to fill the space with something so small, let me know what you think!


Regards,
 
Mitchell


http://oodeys.com/Product/COOLER-MASTER-20677.aspx

This is a link to my PC tower, Mine has a black disk drive and doesn't have the Blue LEDS on the sides... (Would quite like them though!)


Edited by hamluis, 20 September 2017 - 12:07 PM.
Removed unnecessary quotebox, merged posts - Hamluis.


#19 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 21 September 2017 - 04:34 AM

Mitchell, I happen to have two of the exact PSU's that Madman linked, these are great for a single GPU system, as long as it's not a massive power hog. :)

 

Have two of the 550W B3's (the one Madman linked) in budget builds, consisting of mostly reused components & one G3, still 550W, yet Gold rated, in my XPS 8700. So I can recommend the PSU with confidence, one of the cool things about it, is that unlike many, a drop in fit for mini towers, can be used in the smallest PC's. Great recommend on the part of Madman & I'll second the opinion. The main difference between the B3 & G3 (other than Bronze & Gold) is warranty, the B3 has 5 years of coverage, the G3, 7 years. It's amazing how they can cram that much power in a compact size. :)

 

Therefore, as long as the model meets your needs, go for it! Has a button on the back so that the fan doesn't spin unless needed to hold down noise as an added feature. Here's a couple of Newegg reviews of the same model, one's running a i5-7600K & GTX 1080 (8GB GDDR5X), so must be better than I estimated at purchase. EVGA has great PSU's & the #1 distributor of NVIDIA GPU's. 

 

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438120

 

When I was speaking of the 650-750W units may be pushing things, is that if you plan on having only a single GPU, more than that size may be overkill. However, what I don't know at this time, is how much power the newer AMD Vega line uses, so won't make any recommends there. The model that Madman recommended will work fine for at least up to a EVGA 6GB GDDR5 GeForce GTX 1060 FTW + ACX 3.0 cooling, which is a 192 bit GPU. My main two systems has the EVGA SuperNova 650W 'G2' series, a larger model both in wattage & physical size, however would had purchased the same wattage of the G3 series if on the market at the time (2015). 

 

Good Luck & please let us know how things turns out! :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#20 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,163 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 21 September 2017 - 07:49 AM

As for a SSD:

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/SanDisk-PLUS-Sata-inch-Internal/dp/B01F9G414U/ref=sr_1_1?rps=1&ie=UTF8&qid=1505997752&sr=8-1&keywords=ssd&refinements=p_76%3A419158031

 

This one here will do.

Keep in mind a SSD will be more suited to be used as a boot medium for your OS rather than storage,

Also keep in mind that SSD's are smaller than typical desktop HDD's so you may need an adapter but those can be dirt cheap such as this one:

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mounting-Adapter-Bracket-Drive-Holder/dp/B00OCBB56Q/ref=sr_1_2?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1505998063&sr=1-2&keywords=ssd+adapter+2.5+to+3.5

 

The only annoying thing is you will have to back your data up and probably reinstall windows.


Edited by MadmanRB, 21 September 2017 - 07:50 AM.

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


#21 mitcheyfex

mitcheyfex
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 82 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:41 PM

Posted 21 September 2017 - 08:23 AM

Ohhh Okay cat thanks for clearing that up you had me worried there =-) By the sounds of it ill only be benfiting by buying this PSU as i will actually be saving space and also less cables! It's a win-win and ill definetly be buying this soon.

 

Why would i need to re-install windows? Is there no way to transfer the OS over to the SSD drive once installed? (Never done it before so wouldn't know) In regards to backing up my data couldn't i just put it over to my secondary F: drive? as this is 1 TB or would i need to buy an external.

 

Thanks for your replies guys!



#22 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,163 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 21 September 2017 - 12:53 PM

You could use disk cloning, but if you dont have a external drive I highly suggest you get one.

Again its another cost but I always have at least 1 external backup drive.

Backup drives are a good investment next to the power supplies, in fact i say a external drive is essential to piece of mind and ensureing your data is in a safe place, never know if you will bump into a ransomware of some type.


Edited by MadmanRB, 21 September 2017 - 12:55 PM.

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


#23 MDD1963

MDD1963

  • Members
  • 699 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:41 PM

Posted 27 September 2017 - 04:33 AM

Add an SSD for your OS... the 3 year old 'experimental' 850EVO is quite popular.....

 

Replace GPU with GTX1050Ti/1060... (if your PSU will handle the 1060)

 

If your MB, PSU, and current cooling solution permits, overclock to 4.5 GHz...

 

(I'd try to make do with 8 GB of RAM rather than throwing more money into an older DDR3 board....)

 

 

That should hold you for a year or so...depending on which games you play.

 

Other than gaming, it might hold you for longer....


Asus Z270A Prime/7700K/32 GB DDR4-3200/GTX1060


#24 MDD1963

MDD1963

  • Members
  • 699 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:41 PM

Posted 27 September 2017 - 05:00 AM

You could use disk cloning, but if you dont have a external drive I highly suggest you get one.

Again its another cost but I always have at least 1 external backup drive.

Backup drives are a good investment next to the power supplies, in fact i say a external drive is essential to piece of mind and ensureing your data is in a safe place, never know if you will bump into a ransomware of some type.

 

Concur on external drive, they come in quite handy!

 

I did upgrade a pastor's older 3xxx series i7 during a 'won't even post' repair (ironically caused by a broken connector on the SSD, as the black L-shaped plastic piece was broken/missing, with all the pins suspended in midair, and someone's previous 'string repair' had failed), and cloned his too small Intel 160 GB SSD over to a larger Samsung 850 EVO with the provided migration software without issue. As his Intel SSD was still functional, and still worked fine in a 5.25" Icy Dock dual 3.5"/2.5" removable drive bay, I sold him that out of my own rig so that he could at least use the old SSD without issue) Then noticed he had an unused 1 TB Toshiba drive sitting on his desk, and when I looked at it, he stated it did not work, as it would not show up. A quick initial setup/quick format in Admin/Storage, and he was happy! As it was a pastor, naturally I worked for free. :) 

 

Those IcyDock 5.25" dual 3.5"/2.5" removable drive adapter bays rock! (if they still make them!)

 

Sorry, I digressed! 


Asus Z270A Prime/7700K/32 GB DDR4-3200/GTX1060


#25 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 27 September 2017 - 06:42 AM

With the i7-2500K, the system should last several more years over the Ivy Bridge & Haswell (3rd & 4th gen 'i' series), as Intel was still soldering the IHS (the part were we apply thermal paste) in place, which allows for better cooling. AMD kept this practice. :)

 

I say this because most all Intel quad core CPU's after Sandy Bridge now are bonded together with cheap thermal paste & glue, although Intel stated that they used a 'better' solution on the Devil's Canyon CPU's (the i5-4690K & i7-4790K, of which I have both). Only a delid & replace the thermal solution with liquid metal can drop temps to where a stock Sandy Bridge runs at idle & under load, or use some form of liquid cooling, which I won't use due to safety. 

 

Bottom line, a i7-2500K can be stored for years & run just like when placed back in use, with the newer CPU's, one has to be concerned with the thermal paste drying out, it's not a matter of if, rather when. If removed & stored for a few years, the paste may break down & has to be replaced ASAP if temps are high at idle. Otherwise, there'll be thermal runaway & it's a one way trip. the CPU becomes shot. 

 

This is why many hangs onto their Sandy Bridge CPU's, the i7-2500K (if new) now sells for more than released, and even used ones retains high value on eBay, as well as MB's for the series. Many who has upgraded to a i7-6700K/7700K has ended up regretting selling their i7-2500K CPU's, to this date, maybe a 10% performance increase, less if their 2500K were overclocked. 

 

I now have an even mixture of Intel & AMD builds, and when it comes time to build a new main rig (around 2020), will go AMD. Even if there's a slight single core drop in performance, doesn't matter to me, because am not a gamer, just want a nice, powerful system. Today's AMD CPU's would give me just that, and I expect things to improve even more by the time I'm ready to 'catch up with the Jones's'. :)

 

MDD1963 gave excellent advice above, having an external drive for disk imaging & storage of important data is critical not only for the sake of recovery, now add security to the list to prevent having to pay a ransom for your files. I use Macrium Reflect to create weekly images of my most important builds, and never store important documents on the 'C' drive, will place on an internal Data drive instead & then transfer to one or more externals. Macrium (free edition) also has an option to add an entry to the bootloader for imaging disks, this makes for fast backups, although keep the latest WinPE ISO on an external if I need to clone a drive, or an infection hits the OS. I'd then securely erase the drive before restoring the last image, using Parted Magic & the Full erase (not the offered 'enhanced' option), takes under a minute for most SSD's except for very large models. If HDD, will first use a bootable partition tool to reset the MBR, then use DBAN to wipe the HDD with the 'autonuke' option, which is a DOD certified 3 pass wipe and a last scattering random data. Not even the FBI, CIA or any other agency recover any data, yet for most, the important part is ensuring all traces of Malware/Ransomware are securely deleted. :thumbsup:

 

So it's not only important to image the OS drive, also any Data ones. And one doesn't have to purchase low quality & useless if the connector becomes broken retail packaged externals. I use USB 3.0 & eSATA enclosures and/or a docking station (have 4 enclosures & two docking stations) & several extra HDD's laying around packaged well, or if needed, will purchase a 'bare drive' on promo. Most of my backup drives are 1TB retired models from the SATA-2 era (one WD Caviar Black, an RE4 & two Samsung HD103SJ), in excellent condition & I perform tests on all at least once per year, the extended one. If needed, I'd not have issue with placing either back in active service as Data drives, are likely better than most new ones of today. I use smaller 160-250GB drives (a couple SATA-1) for imaging my notebooks with a docking station. The only useless drive is a dead one in my place. :lol:

 

As far as an SSD goes, a 250-256GB model is the 'sweet spot', and if the Documents, Downloads, Pictures/Videos & other items are stored on the internal Data drive, the SSD will always have plenty of free space. I have a few secondary systems running some of my original 120-128GB SSD's, combined with a 500GB to 1TB HDD & still am fine, even after leaving 10GB of unformatted space at the end of the SSD (recommended). This keeps the SSD fast & room for the controllers to do it's job, and if needed, can replace a bad block with one in the unallocated space (better known as over provisioning). Most all SSD OEM's recommends this practice & some has the software to manage the space, although 10% of a 500GB or larger model is overkill, 25GB of free space is plenty, up to 1TB. 

 

BTW, I also have one of the IcyDock 5.25" dual 3.5"/2.5" removable drive adapter bays that MDD1963 was speaking of, great for having two SSD's, or a SSD & 2.5" HDD and low cost. I used the opening in front to also install a TechRepublic USB 3.0 two port hub (1st link below), so made the most out of the adapter & backup speeds are faster than the ports on the MB's panel. :) 

 

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817659011

 

Here's the IcyDock 5.25" dual 3.5"/2.5" removable drive adapter bay. 

 

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1051165-REG/icy_dock_mb343sp_flex_fit_trio_3_5_to.html

 

Newegg also has it with free shipping available, although I prefer B&H when an item is needed fast. :)

 

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817994163

 

You'll always have room for upgrades in your PC, it's a matter of your priorities & budget that'll make the right decisions & I'll repeat for one last time, your i7-2500K is still relevant in 2017. There are many who wouldn't take what they paid for the build when these were popular ones, the proof is all over these various Tech Forums, especially the ones associated with overclocking. :thumbsup:

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#26 mitcheyfex

mitcheyfex
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 82 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:41 PM

Posted 27 January 2018 - 02:18 PM

Hi guys,

 

Thought i'd give you an update as a lot of you really helped me out and i thought i'd report my progress!

 

So my PSU eventually died and following Madman's advice I have purchased this EVGA SuperNOVA 550 G3, 80 Plus Gold 550W, Fully Modular, Eco Mode with New HDB Fan, 7 Year Warranty, Includes Power ON Self Tester, Compact 150mm Size, Power Supply 220-G3-0550-Y3 It's not the one that was recommended but it is still EVGA and it's gold rated, my computer is so much quieter! Is this a good PSU?

 

I've also bought an SSD and I went for the Samsung Pro 850 256GB (Again not the one recommended but i'm told these are good.) I have cloned windows to this and may i just say WOW the difference in my boot times and general tasks are phenominal. From installing the PSU i'm now fairly confident in building PC's and at least tinkering so that's also fantastic! My next route i'd like to go down is getting this Overclocked, but it intimidates me... I have a 3.3GHZ system and i'd like it running at 4.0 GHZ just not sure if my system would be able to handle it, could someone give me a simple easy to follow guide? do I need a better CPU cooling fan? Do i need to add thermal paste, what software do I run etc etc.

 

I haven't yet upgraded my graphics card but this will be the next step.

 

I am however noticing that sometimes my PC doesn't boot (No beep from the mobo) every now and then and it's happened for quite some time now any ideas on what this could be? It's defo not the PSU, the fans work power button comes on just no boot on the screen. Could this be related to my graphics card or possibly my motherboard?! after a few restarts it boots up as normal and you can hear the 'Beep'

 

Special thanks to @Madman & @cat and the rest of you for your support and any ideas on what could be causing my PC not too boot would be appreciated!



#27 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,163 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 27 January 2018 - 03:08 PM

It might just be a loose connector, double check your wiring.

 

As for the GPU.

 

 

Yipes good luck as right now the GPU market is a total mess with even the entry level GPU's like the 1050Ti being hiked up to $500 this is not a good time to be a PC gamer.

 

Best off holding off another month or so on that as hopefully GPU's will come back in stick but crypto miners have totally devastated the GPU market.


Edited by MadmanRB, 27 January 2018 - 03:09 PM.

You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


#28 mitcheyfex

mitcheyfex
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 82 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:41 PM

Posted 27 January 2018 - 03:29 PM

Yeah, i'll be sure to check the connectors, any ones in particular? And regarding the market -  yeah I hear you there!!



#29 MadmanRB

MadmanRB

    Spoon!!!!


  • Members
  • 3,163 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:No time for that when there is evil afoot!
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 27 January 2018 - 04:41 PM

Check the motherboard connectors or the CPU connectors just in case, if this is a sign of a GPU failure then boy... yipes.


You know you want me baby!

Proud Linux user and dual booter.

Proud Vivaldi user.

 

ljxaqg-6.png


#30 zzz00m

zzz00m

  • Members
  • 40 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 05 February 2018 - 11:48 AM

Another thing I noticed about your PC specs, is that you are only running one stick of RAM in single channel mode [8.00GB Single-Channel DDR3 @ 668MHz (9-9-9-24)].

 

Your motherboard should have 4 memory slots, so you should be running at least a dual channel memory kit (2x4GB, or 2x8GB) for maximum performance.  Plus that motherboard supports stock speeds up to DDR3 1600 without overclocking.  So that single memory slot you do have appears to be running a bit on the slow side.  This is an upgrade that should work well with the SSD upgrade, to enhance overall system responsiveness.

 

https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/P8Z77V_LX/HelpDesk_Manual/

 


Dual-Channel DDR3 2400(O.C.) / 2200(O.C.) / 2133(O.C) / 1866(O.C.) / 1600 / 1333 / 1066 Support

The motherboard supports DDR3 memory that features data transfer rates of 2400(O.C.) /
2200(O.C.) / 2133(O.C.) / 1866(O.C.)/ 1600 / 1333 / 1066 MHz to meet the higher bandwidth
requirements of the latest 3D graphics, multimedia, and Internet applications. The dual-
channel DDR3 architecture enlarges the bandwidth of your system memory to boost system
performance.


Edited by zzz00m, 05 February 2018 - 11:50 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users