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What did I break?


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#1 sam000lee

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 11:54 AM

So I was watering my plants which sit on the windowsill overlooking my desk which is above my tower and after the water drained into the dish, it overflowed, dripped onto my desk, trickled towards the edge and made it's way onto the top of my case. Some water got in and the computer, which was on shut off and won't start up or seem to get any power whatsoever.

 

When I opened it up, I couldn't see exactly where the water had dripped. I don't think it got on the power supply or the graphics card as they both have an undisturbed layer of dust. I also pulled the leads to the case power button and tried to short the on switch but still got nothing. 

If I were to guess the damage is to the motherboard.

 

My questions:

1. Is there a way to test the power supply to rule it out, assuming the motherboard is non-functional?

2. If you dumped a bunch of water onto a motherboard while a computer is running and nothing else got wet, (how) would the other components be affected, if at all.

3. Other likely parts I should consider before just buying another motherboard?

 

 

Here's my computer: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/dhnwf7

 

Thanks!

 



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 12:14 PM

Have you given things time to dry out?   It is entirely possible to have issues like this until what's wet has dried out entirely.

 

There are ways to test the output of the power supply with a multimeter but I'd have to go back and research which connections are which on the different output cables (e.g. Molex).  If you do a web search on something like "check molex connector" someone will almost certainly have given instructions for probing this style of connector.  I personally like to use a power supply tester such as those shown by this search at dx.com:  http://www.dx.com/s/%22power+supply+tester%22?cateId=0&cateName=All%20Categories, but I have need to test power supplies on a semi-regular basis and these make it incredibly fast to do so from all of the common connector styles (and to see if you happen to have a situation where a single cable has gone wonky rather than the power supply itself).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1703, Build 15063

       

". . . American business has yet to learn how to measure the productivity and effectiveness of professional and technical employees.  As a result, employees who get little done, but spend a lot of time doing it, are often rewarded more than those who fulfill or exceed job requirements while keeping reasonable hours.
     A job that routinely requires 60 to 80 hours per week is mismanaged, understaffed, or staffed with the wrong person.  A badly managed firm isn't a good place for men or women, parents or not."  ~ Sophie M. Korczyk

 


#3 sam000lee

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 12:28 PM

I put a fan on it as soon as it happened which my roommate moved a couple hours later. It's been a day and a half since then and still nothing...

 

Thanks for the tip - I don't have access to a tester but google gave me some options so I'll have a go at that.

 

My mother board was $79 when I got it and now it's $200+!



#4 britechguy

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 12:35 PM

I very much doubt it's the motherboard, particularly since you say the system was turned off.  The power supply is the most likely culprit, but I'm surprised you wouldn't have heard something odd during the incident if it had fried itself.

 

But if water made its way into any of the various connectors to the mobo it can cause problems until it's completely dry, and that can sometimes take days.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1703, Build 15063

       

". . . American business has yet to learn how to measure the productivity and effectiveness of professional and technical employees.  As a result, employees who get little done, but spend a lot of time doing it, are often rewarded more than those who fulfill or exceed job requirements while keeping reasonable hours.
     A job that routinely requires 60 to 80 hours per week is mismanaged, understaffed, or staffed with the wrong person.  A badly managed firm isn't a good place for men or women, parents or not."  ~ Sophie M. Korczyk

 


#5 sam000lee

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 01:18 PM

Sorry, to clarify - the computer was ON when the water hit and it caused it to shut off.



#6 The-Toolman

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 01:51 PM

The 1st thing I would do is to remove the power supply and take the cover off and if an air compressor is available then to blow the power supply out with blasts of air to remove any dust and moisture that may be present.

 

Be very cautious when working inside of an open power supply as capacitors sometimes hold a charge.

 

Most power supplies have a fuse located inside of them which is either soldered in or snaps into a fuse holder so look for a fuse and try to determine if it has popped.

 

If an air compressor is available also blow out every where inside of the desktop case / motherboard  etc and set in front of a fan for several hours to several days out door sunlight is excellent for moisture drying.

 

No guarantee that any of this will fix anything as powered on electronics and water will destroy things quickly.

 

My 2 cents worth.


Edited by The-Toolman, 14 September 2017 - 01:52 PM.

Linux Mint 18 Sarah Xfce (32bit) / Hp-pavilion-m7267c / Intel Pentium D Processor 820 Smithfield (2M Cache, 2.80 GHz, 800 MHz FSB, LGA 775 Socket) / Mobo: ASUS P5LP-LE, (Lithium-UL8E) / DDR2 Memory 4.0 GB, 800 MHz FSB / Graphics Card: ATI Radeon X600/X600 SE, (AMD/ATI) RV370 PCIE.

 

Windows 7 Professional (32bit) / Dell Optiplex 380 / Intel Core 2 Duo E7500 Wolfdale (3M Cache, 2.93 GHz, 1066 MHz FSB, LGA 775 Socket) / DDR3 Memory 3.0 GB, 1066 MHz FSB / Intel G41 Series Integrated Graphics Controller.

 

 


#7 britechguy

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 02:02 PM

I suspect a blown fuse or blown power supply now as well.

 

With any luck it will be only the fuse, or the fuse and power supply will have "gone up in smoke together" while not sending a surge outward to the hardware in the process.

 

I concur (no surprise there) with the "clean out, and long dry out approach The-Toolman is recommending.  I've revived a number of pieces of electronic equipment from the dead after swims or showers just by waiting a sufficient amount of time for everything to dry out before attempting to power it all up again.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1703, Build 15063

       

". . . American business has yet to learn how to measure the productivity and effectiveness of professional and technical employees.  As a result, employees who get little done, but spend a lot of time doing it, are often rewarded more than those who fulfill or exceed job requirements while keeping reasonable hours.
     A job that routinely requires 60 to 80 hours per week is mismanaged, understaffed, or staffed with the wrong person.  A badly managed firm isn't a good place for men or women, parents or not."  ~ Sophie M. Korczyk

 


#8 The-Toolman

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 02:04 PM

This may help ONLY AFTER the power supply is fully dry.

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/172933/how-can-i-test-my-computers-power-supply/

 

http://dodji.seketeli.com/downloads/shuttle-psu-paper-clip-test.pdf

 

If you have a multimeter.

 

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-test-the-power-supply-in-computer-2626129


Linux Mint 18 Sarah Xfce (32bit) / Hp-pavilion-m7267c / Intel Pentium D Processor 820 Smithfield (2M Cache, 2.80 GHz, 800 MHz FSB, LGA 775 Socket) / Mobo: ASUS P5LP-LE, (Lithium-UL8E) / DDR2 Memory 4.0 GB, 800 MHz FSB / Graphics Card: ATI Radeon X600/X600 SE, (AMD/ATI) RV370 PCIE.

 

Windows 7 Professional (32bit) / Dell Optiplex 380 / Intel Core 2 Duo E7500 Wolfdale (3M Cache, 2.93 GHz, 1066 MHz FSB, LGA 775 Socket) / DDR3 Memory 3.0 GB, 1066 MHz FSB / Intel G41 Series Integrated Graphics Controller.

 

 


#9 sam000lee

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 02:05 PM

Great, thanks to you both. I have a compressor so will blow everything out, check the power supply fuse, and then stick everything in front of a fan for a couple of days.






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