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A question to vegetarians and vegans


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#1 Just_One_Question

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:05 AM

Hey, non-meat-eaters, I am considering a vegetarian diet. I have one question, though. Is a vegetarian diet really more inexpensive than a regular one, because:

1.You don't buy meat, which has, of course, always been the costliest food

2.Or is it actually more expensive than a regular food diet, because even though you've spent less money on food, since it is harder to extract as many nutrients from veggies than it is from meat, you have to eat more food to get your calorie intake. This means that your meals get prolonged by, let's say, 10 minutes each. If you eat 3 times a day for 10 minutes longer, that's 30 minutes per day or about 100 hours per a working year. At $7.25 minimum wage, that makes a potential minimum loss of $725 per year. So, is a vegetarian diet really cheaper than usual when the time loss is taken into account as well? Thanks!:)



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#2 georgehenry

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:28 AM

When I worked, I was for many years, a medical rep. Many doctors told me that they used to see a lot of problems associated with vegan and vegetarian diets. The general consensus was that vegans and vegetarians could get a reasonable diet containing all the nutrients needed, but it was very difficult to do so. The minerals and vitamins etc. that were in meat and fish, were hard to come by in those diets, so people on them started to show signs of deficiency diseases. I suppose we have been eating meat for so long, our bodies protest, and start to get problems when it is denied it. 


Edited by georgehenry, 13 September 2017 - 10:29 AM.


#3 Just_One_Question

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:49 AM

I've heard/read that as long as you eat relatively varied vegetarian foods (not fully vegan, though - I like cheese, milk, eggs, etc. a lot!) and supplement it with a normal daily dose of multivitamins, as I am doing now anyways, you'd be good to go? Or if you are not feeling all to well, maybe eat a stake, meatballs or fish once per week, for example. At least that's what I am thinking about. But I don't want to lose too much time in eating. :)


Edited by Just_One_Question, 13 September 2017 - 10:51 AM.


#4 r.a.d.

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 11:10 AM

It was cheaper for me decades ago. Perhaps would be today as well. Hard to tell if meals would take longer to consume, I don't see how. Also, a healthy body is pretty efficient at extracting needed nutrients from food regardless of the source I would think.
Back in '79 and '80's I tried it for over a year while doing heavy physical construction of a custom house near Yosemite. While building up a lot of grunt-muscle I also lost quite a bit of weight. I do recall supplementing that diet with B-12 which is perhaps why no deficiencies were noticed.
After that experiment, BBQ was heaven!
Bleepin' desert rat retiree in climes yet to fry brains (knock on cactus).

Past climes/best friend:  photo-91.gif

#5 mjd420nova

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 11:13 AM

Let's face it, Humans are meat eaters.  Our bodies know what it needs to exist happily and complains when it doesn't get what it needs.  All things in moderation.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 11:16 AM

Humans are "whatever" eaters.   I know plenty of vegetarians and vegans just like I know plenty of those who include meat in their diets (including myself).  It is entirely possible to maintain one's health on a vegetarian or vegan diet.  It's no different, in fact, than on a regular diet:  one must know what to eat and how much of it to get what one needs.

 

To JOQ:  To me, worrying about the amount of time it takes to eat is akin to worrying about the amount of time it takes to have sex.  It diminishes the pleasure in both.  Both are experiences to be savored, not rushed.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#7 r.a.d.

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 11:26 AM

To britechguy, your last statement is classic, akin to a gourmet restaurant knowing you're not there to eat, but to dine.
Bleepin' desert rat retiree in climes yet to fry brains (knock on cactus).

Past climes/best friend:  photo-91.gif

#8 Just_One_Question

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 04:09 PM

Yes, I too am a meat-eater, of course, but just noticed that even though I eat what I want, sometimes I accidentally go a couple of days without meat - mainly more dough-based dishes, such as spaghetti, banitsa etc. I've also coupled that information with the fact that there hasn't been a month in my life so far when spending on food (apart from rent at one point) hasn't been the single largest monthly expense I've had (yeah, I'm one of those people that can't cook even if it meant that we'd die of starvation otherwise, so we rely on other people's production, lol). And also with some potential health benefits added, it seemed to me that going vegetarian wouldn't be all that bad of an idea. However, when I was eating a cabbage yesterday, I've noticed that it took me quite a while to get full enough, whereas when eating something like meatballs, I'm done in like 5 minutes. :lmao: Apart from dinner at home, it would appear that from school to real world, food breaks aren't prolonged enough to have a proper meal, so you have to learn how to shove food in yourself fast - not the most aesthetic way to dine. Hell, in high school smokers had a majority in the school board, so instead of having one 25 minute break in the middle of the day, we had two 10 minute breaks that were clearly designed for smokers, and we left school 5 minutes early. I guess what I am going to do is give the vegetarian diet a try and will research which non-meat foods have the highest calories supply per weight, so that it can be both healthy, inexpensive and faster - like potatoes for example, which I love in all forms, besides mashed all that much. :)

SasDDqOSRclNu.gif


Edited by Just_One_Question, 13 September 2017 - 04:12 PM.


#9 r.a.d.

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 04:47 PM

Not having your own cooking skills saves you preparation time but definitely cuts into the wallet, as well as limiting meal choices to what's available. 
Had some coleslaw today (went nice with a BBQ pulled pork slider) but gnawing on a head of cabbage instead sounds arduous.
When working a short stint at a Home Depot a while back, 30 min. lunch equaled inhaling whatever fast food place was nearby, so I usually counter balanced by cooking a great dinner, much to my wife's pleasure.
Your phrase about potential health benefits seems the consensus among many doctors and nutritionists (with supplements). However, if you click the image link below, too much good health can possibly have unintended consequences down the road: :)
https://i.pinimg.com/736x/18/d8/c5/18d8c5d3873b4e81e273f9e65843d1b0--clean-living-old-age.jpg
Bleepin' desert rat retiree in climes yet to fry brains (knock on cactus).

Past climes/best friend:  photo-91.gif

#10 Just_One_Question

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 05:37 PM

Yeah, of course, I'm more interested in generally better health in the latter years of my life than simply a prolonged one per se.:lmao: It would appear that genetics accounts for 70+% of the longevity that one's life has. I've seen people never drink a drop of alcohol and die relatively young of cirrhosis and ones who've smoked for more than half a century and drank heavily every single day to a state of almost perpetual drunkenness live 90+ years. Still, it would be nice to tilt the odds in your favour.:)



#11 britechguy

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 05:51 PM

One of the best things you could do is to take some classes to develop a basic set of cooking skills and a core repertoire of things you make.  Not only does it save you money but, once you realize you can do it, it can be quite fun.  As you might guess, I cook.  Right now I'm in the process of putting together a pear upside down cake.

 

There is no way you will ever reduce your food budget significantly whether you eat only prepared foods or eat out.  Also, it is almost impossible to be vegetarian or vegan in most places unless you are the one preparing a very large portion of your diet.  This is particularly true for vegans.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#12 r.a.d.

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 07:08 PM

I also enjoy cooking and we often buy when items are on sale. Many of our meals rival the best restaurants, not bragging but being honest, at a fraction of the cost.
The Internet is replete with recipes as well, and simple instructions, then after a while one learns to,create their own recipes.
An example: not long ago I broiled some lobster tails that were on sale with paprika/touch of garlic, steamed asparagus with a reduced orange juice/shallot/Dijon/butter sauce and wild rice (cheap at a store here called Trader Joe's) with some pineapple chunks. That same meal at a restaurant would be extremely expensive.
And then some evenings we'll just nuke a TV dinner.
Might add while in mind, particularly if you're single where the motivation for pleasing more than one isn't there, slow cookers are great. Make a batch, eat and freeze leftovers for future meals.
Bleepin' desert rat retiree in climes yet to fry brains (knock on cactus).

Past climes/best friend:  photo-91.gif

#13 Just_One_Question

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 07:25 PM

That's pretty cool. The last time I tried to cook, it started out as a soup preparation, but halfway through turned into what looked like a Satanic ritual to make poison. :lmao: I have this press with which I make sandwiches (btw, great, simple technology; costs around $50 at absolute most). I oftentimes joke that if I marry a hardcore feminist, the theoretical life of our relationship would be 2 weeks, as none of us would cook to save our lives. :lmao: Still, I think I'm not that bad with a grill, which is also pretty simple to master. :)


Edited by Just_One_Question, 13 September 2017 - 07:27 PM.


#14 r.a.d.

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 07:31 PM

The grill, can't,beat it. Also, I've done veggies on the BBQ which turns out quite tasty.
Re:vegan/slow cookers:
http://www.google.com/search?q=vegetarian+slow+cooker+recipes&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en&client=safari
Bleepin' desert rat retiree in climes yet to fry brains (knock on cactus).

Past climes/best friend:  photo-91.gif

#15 The-Toolman

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 08:06 PM

To me, worrying about the amount of time it takes to eat is akin to worrying about the amount of time it takes to have sex.  It diminishes the pleasure in both.  Both are experiences to be savored, not rushed.

You britechguy are a Seasoned Individual and no truer statement ever made. :wink:


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