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Some Questions Before I Install


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#1 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 05:07 PM

I have a desktop that I've never really used and thought it would be great to install Linux on it and learn Linux.  I'll probably go for Ubuntu. 

 

I want to erase Windows (7) from this machine and only run Ubuntu.  How do I reformat before installing?  I get it that I have to copy the system onto a USB stick or DVD and that seems straight forward.  But the videos and articles I've seen are more about booting from USB/DVD and that's not what I want.

 

Will I have to find all the drivers?  Is there any easier way to do that?

 

Thanks.



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#2 NickAu

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 05:14 PM

 

I want to erase Windows (7) from this machine and only run Ubuntu.  How do I reformat before installing?

Linux will do that for you. Select the first option as shown.

 

ubuntu1304installation-small_003.png

 

Will I have to find all the drivers?

 

Normally you dont need to look for drivers Linux takes care of that during install.

 

 

 

Before you start the install make sure your PC has access to the net and make sure you plug the printer in if you have one.



#3 Condobloke

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 05:48 PM

After you have 'copied' or 'burnt' the ubuntu system to a dvd/usb.....boot from that usb or dvd and then click on the INSTALL icon which will be on the desktop.

 

Following that you will see the window which Nick has shown above.


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#4 The-Toolman

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 08:43 PM

This should help.

 

http://files.ubuntu-manual.org/manuals/getting-started-with-ubuntu/16.04/en_US/screen/Getting%20Started%20with%20Ubuntu%2016.04.pdf


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#5 MadmanRB

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 10:32 PM

How about you give us the specs for this desktop so we know what would be a good fit for this machine?

Ubuntu is fine but there are others to consider, I normally suggest linux mint for those who are totally fresh to the linux experience but it would help to know what hardware we are dealing with.


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#6 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 05:32 AM

I'll second Madman on that one. There are literally hundreds of Linux distros; Ubuntu may not be the best 'fit' for your particular hardware. As he says, for beginners, Mint really is a better choice, despite the pundits all recommending Ubuntu.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


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#7 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 06:20 AM

Thanks for all this information.   I now feel comfortable making the switch.  I don't have the computer set up at the moment and am in the middle of a move.  I'll fire it up and get the specs.

 

I have a newer laptop and was speaking with a repair person at Microcenter about installing Linux on a newer machine and he cautioned me that the drivers might not be available.  I won't be doing that until I've had a chance to test myself on a Linux machine.  My goal is to learn more about using the computer from the command line, which will be a challenge I'm sure as I'm not wired that way. 

 

All this information looks great!  I'm really drawn to the philosophy of the system.

 

What's the easiest way to gather all the data you want about the computer in order to recommend the best distro?  It is a Windows 7 machine.


Edited by LittleGreenDots, 13 September 2017 - 07:12 AM.


#8 xrobwx

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:06 AM

Your experience with either Ubuntu or Mint will be more like Windows than you seem to think. I started with Mint and it is the best one to start with IMO. Although you will use the Terminal (command line) once you get it setup to your liking, you'll use it less and less, if you want to use it less or more is up to you. This is one of the cool things about Linux, you have control.


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#9 MadmanRB

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:28 AM

Well if its a windows 7 machine then it should be fine but do you know if you have say AMD graphics on it?

Is it a intel machine?

Any nvidia devices?


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#10 The-Toolman

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:38 AM

This is an excellent resource.

 

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/


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#11 mremski

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 12:14 PM

If it's a newer laptop, simply telling us the Manufacturer and model would go a long way towards us being able to help you.  Something like "Lenovo Thinkpad E531" tells us a lot.

 

Drivers.  The biggest issue for Linux and any other Open Source OS is drivers for Wireless.  If the hardware is Broadcomm, there may not be a driver for it (Proprietary info, NDA, all that good legal stuff).

Graphics:  Intel plays pretty well with Linux (they may have folks actually being paid to do the work), Nvidia releases a binary blob that works fairly well, I'm not sure of the state of AMD at the moment.  Keep in mind that sometimes the graphics are integrated (Intel) so latest gen processors may not have full support.

Most of the rest of the hardware should work fine.

 

A suggestion:  if you can get a new disk (SSD/mSATA/whatever) to install Linux on.  That way you are minimizing a whole lot of potential issues with multibooting and you can't break anything that works on the Windows disk.  If there is data on the Windows disk you need, you can always get an external cradle that will take the drive and plug into the USB, turn it into an external drive.


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#12 synergy513

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 01:45 PM

Relatively new Mint 18 Mate user here. I was astonished how smooth it was to get started, i was expecting the command line to go astray and misfire intent, but the mate distro is a splendid and robust GUI, kind of like windows. I noticed the hard way that the PCI wireless cards are a challenge to configure, whereas the usb dongle wifi adapter was ready to go. the easy linux tips project page mentioned above was a great resource for me to get setup. Turn on the firewall, install firejail sandbox and install  noscript add-on for firefox, and your in business, at least telecom wise.

 

     There is the Mint xfce flavor for the lightweight approach if the CPU/RAM/Video isn't the greatest.

 

 

          regarding the Dual Boot prospect, I use two hard drives, one for WindowsOS and one for Mate. Most BIOS editions will let the user decide which hard drive to boot from, I just set the default to Linux, and if i want to boot from Windows, i  just go to the boot options at startup and over ride the default

 

Also, if there is a windows application that you want to use in the linux environment, the trick is called WINE, it allows most windows programs to piggyback on a layer and run in Linux.


Edited by synergy513, 13 September 2017 - 02:00 PM.

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#13 cat1092

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 04:46 AM

Linux Mint MATE user here also, since early 2009, back when called the Main or Gnome edition, 2-3 years before Cinnamon was heard of. :)

 

After bouncing around a few distros, to include Ubuntu, once I met Linux Mint, knew it was the distro for me. While there were reports of alleged security letdowns with Mint 16, I had no troubles, if so would had dropped the distro as though a hot coal. Looking forward in about 16 months to be what'll be my 10 year usage of Linux Mint MATE. Have tried Cinnamon several times, just wasn't right for me, also the KDE version, didn't last two days. The only other version of Mint I've used & liked on low resource systems is the Xfce edition, although MATE isn't really that more demanding & ships fully loaded with software. Great distro for Home & Business user alike, there's good reason why Mint has been in the Top 5 Linux distros since late 2011. 

 

Of course, Ubuntu helped Mint gain huge back then with their now abandoned Unity UI, still supported until 2021 for version 16.04 LTS, yet there won't be anymore Unity releases, has returned back to Gnome. Not that Unity was that bad, rather grew so fast with other platforms (smartphones) that Canonical simply had to bow out, to focus on their paying business/enterprise customers. If not already done, am sure that at some point, Canonical will sell the rights to Unity off to the highest bidder.

 

At any rate, there's good reason why many in the tech industry has stated over the last 2-3 years that Linux Mint (Cinnamon or MATE) is an ideal 'drop in replacement' for Windows 7. A quick Google search will confirm this.

 

The main thing as far as drivers goes, is being connected to the Internet at time of install & have any accessories such as printers (even if wireless) plugged into a USB port & powered on. There are .deb installers for some printers, which in essence are the same as .exe files. :)

 

Good Luck! :thumbup2:

 

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#14 LittleGreenDots

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 05:06 PM

A friend suggested I run Mint Cinnamon from a disk first and try it out before creating a linux-only computer.  I was going to try it on my laptop.  l watched a video about installing it onto a USB stick and note that there is an intermediate program that converts the Mint installation boot-able.  I was planning on a DVD.  Do I have to do anything special to make the DVD work properly when I boot up in Mint?

 

Also, a few people stressed the importance of being online.  I'm not sure what to do if I have trouble hooking up the internet.  Or are these unnecessary steps because I will be running Mint from a DVD?  I only have wi-fi.

 

Thanks



#15 MadmanRB

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 05:40 PM

If it's possible I would actually suggest you use a USB thumb drive as I find them more reliable then DVD drives especially if you want to assess Linux for yourself before actually installing it as the DVD would be a very poor representation of What Linux can be like on your system if you don't have one that's okay as they can be come cheaply online if you know where to look. I mean I can understand if DVDs are what media you have right now but in my experience I find USB drives are more reliable for evaluation purposes and installation


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