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Best hard drive manufacturer?


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#1 EvilJ

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 04:39 PM

Other than Seagate or Western Digital. Due to some very irksome personal experiences with both of these companies, I am looking for the best alternative to either with similar speeds and specifications. I thought about Samsung, but then I found out that except for their SSD line, they just use Seagate drives and slap a Samsung sticker on it.

 

To be clear, I am meaning mechanical hard drives with at least 7200 RPM's and SATA III connections in the capacity range of 1TB and up



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 04:45 PM

I suggest you take a look at:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_hard_disk_drives

 

Specifically, the figure, "Diagram of consolidation," in the Manufacturing History section.


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#3 EvilJ

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 04:47 PM

Thanks!



#4 hamluis

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 05:30 PM

You cannot assume that any manufacturer is "better" than the other.

 

The reality is that SSDs are replacing hard drives...more quality assurance, faster...but today's price gambits favor hard drives for storage.  I believe that is changing but the price point does not yet mandate outright use of SSDs for all systems, including as storage containers.

 

I've decided that I will never buy another hard drive...the cost of SSDs has decreased enough that I am willing to afford/use SSDs in lieu of the known headaches that lie with hard drives.  A year ago, I would not have thought such but times are changing :).

 

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Edited by hamluis, 11 September 2017 - 05:39 PM.


#5 britechguy

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 06:01 PM

HDDs have been, in my personal experience, one of the most reliable components of computer systems since I've been working with them (mid-1980s).  The only HDDs I've had fail were early 1TB desktop external HDDs.  Everything else has just kept running and running and running.

 

I've probably just cursed myself with the above comment, but for me the bang for the buck and the reliability of HDDs still makes them preferable to SSDs if huge storage spaces are wanted.


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#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 06:28 PM

A case can certainly be made for putting the OS and applications on a SSD but in terms of £s per GB large spinning rust discs are still significantly cheaper than SSDs of similar capacity. And I have to agree with Brian about the reliability of platter drives. In the last 20+ years I have only had one of my own discs, in a laptop, turn its toes up.

 

A quick Google shows that my friendly local supplier will sell me a 3TB drive for £ 80, a 2TB SSD will cost me nearly £ 600. That's a huge price differential and you don't need the speed of an SSD for data.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#7 MadmanRB

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 08:07 PM

In general consensus Western digital is better right now, Seagate has had a rather shaky track record as of late.


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#8 dropbear

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 10:03 PM

In general consensus Western digital is better right now, Seagate has had a rather shaky track record as of late.

 

whereas I'm in the other camp, used to use WD's, but had what I thought was a more than acceptable failure rate, so went to Seagate and haven't looked back.

don't get me wrong, I've had a couple of those fail too.

 

so basically, it's all down to personal preference, luck of the draw and the way you splay out your chicken livers over the sacrificial alter to the IT gods. :bowdown:


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#9 britechguy

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 10:40 PM

And I've been using Toshibas, at least most recently.  I agree with dropbear, it's the luck of the draw.  I'm more price driven for the same specs than brand loyal.


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#10 EvilJ

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 12:26 AM

Well I think the next drive I get is going to be enterprise class



#11 jonuk76

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 07:39 AM

AFAIK the Backblaze blog is one of the few sources of reliability info which is not just purely anecdotal. https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-drive-failure-stats-q2-2017/ (links to one report, but there are years of them).

 

As pointed out already, there are only a handful of drive manufacturers left - Seagate, Western Digital, HGST and Toshiba.  Hitachi/HGST branded drives are still marketed and the situation is quite confusing, but I understand the 2.5" drives are made by Western Digital while the 3.5" drives are made by Toshiba.


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#12 hamluis

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 10:24 AM

Nice link, Jonuk :).

 

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#13 The-Toolman

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 11:09 AM

To be clear, I am meaning mechanical hard drives with at least 7200 RPM's and SATA III connections in the capacity range of 1TB and up

Don't rule out 5400 RPM drives as I have found the speed at which data is accessed is more import than the RPM at which the hard drive spins.

 

5400 RPM hard drives run cooler, use less power, and can if chosen correctly can access data faster than some hard drives that spin at 7200 RPM.

 

Based from my own use of both 5400 RPM and 7200 RPM hard drives.


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#14 MDD1963

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 05:19 PM

OK, I'll bite, just for the sake of discussion: :)

 

Where is a comparison showing any modern 5400 rpm drive 'accessing data' (I sure hope we're not just comparing some sustained data transfers, not some advertised  '10 ms vs. 9 ms seek time number' here as representative of...well, anything) quicker than any modern 7200 rpm drive?

 

(And please do not show a Seagate marketing graph showing some hybrid 5400 rpm drive with an integrated tiny SSD  is faster than a conventional spinning 7200 rpm drive without an SSD; and let's talk some sustained reads and/or writes, not a a single little cached 4k file..) 


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#15 britechguy

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 06:16 PM

https://www.realworldtech.com/5400rpm-vs-7200rpm/   as a starting point.

 

Also, http://www.dewassoc.com/kbase/hard_drives/media_transfer_rates_2.htm gives some interesting info.

 

Like all things related to computing, it's well-nigh impossible to evaluate something (anything) in isolation from the other components it will be operating in consort with.


Edited by britechguy, 12 September 2017 - 06:22 PM.

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