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Over a third of Windows 10 users still don't have the Creators Update


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 10:36 AM

The Windows 10 Fall Creators Update is set to launch on October 17, but a large portion of Windows 10 users are still waiting to be offered the Creators Update which was released back in April.

Windows 10 rollouts tend to be quite slow -- Microsoft only makes each upgrade available to systems it considers compatible -- but the pace of the Creators Update rollout has been positively glacial -- way slower than the Anniversary Update that preceded it.

Article

 

Microsoft better get cracking as the fall update is just around the corner. Hopefully it doesn't mean a lot of computers will no longer be upgradable.


Edited by JohnC_21, 06 September 2017 - 10:37 AM.


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#2 Just_One_Question

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 10:45 AM

To step back for a second, why did they decide to start this rolling updates system, instead of the previous Service Pack one, apart from increased security? It most probably is my low understanding of the subject, but ever since Microsoft began doing that, I can't shake the feeling that they are selling you a half-done Windows product and then slowly patching it every day with updates, like they're not even trying anymore. I like the 'major version every 5 years, 1 update to the current system per year' situation better. It's pretty annoying having to listen to computer fans when going to bed, because the OS is updating for like 10 minutes after you've shut it down. I don't know, I guess they are the experts, so they have good reasons to do this.


Edited by Just_One_Question, 06 September 2017 - 10:46 AM.


#3 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 10:56 AM

If you look at the bug fixes after each Windows 10 update it almost like a rolling beta release.

 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-10-creators-update-microsofts-latest-update-fixes-a-load-of-bugs/



#4 britechguy

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 11:40 AM

If you look at the bug fixes to any Windows update there are a lot of them.

 

I am wondering if a number of machines will now be taken from 1607 to 1709 without ever having had 1703.  It's certainly possible, but nothing official has been said.

 

Microsoft has been struggling to get to their target of 2 feature updates per year on Windows 10 since it was released.  I will be the first to say that Versions in the 15XX range were definitely late beta, regardless of "the official position."   Edge still remains horribly immature for a web browser and, at least on my machine, is generally laggy, badly laggy.

 

I don't think that anyone other than those that were the decision makers regarding Windows as a Service delivery model can tell you what the discussions and justifications were.  I think it was a combination of things, several of the most important being ability to add features much more quickly (which users [some, never all] are demanding), to be able to enforce updating of the OS and, thus, having a far more consistent configuration "out there in the wild" than was ever possible when the end user was allowed to pick and choose among updates, and to respond to certain security issues more rapidly, and comprehensively, than traditional patching allowed.

 

To describe the roll out of 1703 as glacial is an understatement.   Of course, I suspect that a large part of this is (and will remain) based on what Microsoft is getting back via system health telemetry as version update cohorts are formed and the update pushed out.  There is no way that Microsoft could ever have an in-house testbed that includes every possible system configuration on which people actually have Windows 10 running (and many of those systems were never "certified" for Windows 10 by their respective makers, either).  There are bound to be unexpected issues that were impossible to predict based upon even the most thorough of in-house testing prior to roll out.  If the issues are relatively easy to fix and/or don't cripple systems then the full roll out can continue relatively quickly.  If, however, they aren't then that puts the brakes on the next update cohort until the fixes have been applied to the cohort having issues to see if they actually fix those issues on those machines.  This whole cycle, even within a single update cohort where things don't go as expected, is a "lather, rinse, repeat" type cycle until the all clear comes in, then it's on to the next cohort, where other hardware and other issues might be encountered.

 

To be perfectly honest I have no idea how Microsoft (or anyone else, for that matter) could ever be able to write an OS that will "instantly run without issue" on the vast numbers of systems of vastly different configurations, but somehow, they do.  I would not want to be on the Windows 10 development team for love nor money!


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#5 Just_One_Question

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 05:37 PM

Yeah, Microsoft are tremendous at being everything for everyone and if an issue is to be specified, it'd probably be that they seem to be oftentimes rushing it in terms of updates. Sometimes there is an update to a feature that was updated last week or something like that. They could've just stalled it a bit - that's actually kind of annoying with the iPhone as well, that they are releasing 'a new' one ever year, or every other year if you don't count the S's. But I guess that is more so fueled by business reasons. I know that a perfect product is unachievable, apart from having kids, but there's no way that they are not obviously rushing it too much and sometimes rolling out half-working features, such as the Microsoft Edge. Heck, even Bleeping Computer doesn't allow you to edit your comments after a brief time is expired, thus pushing you to 'roll them out' relatively full and 'debugged', lol. I feel like such things are a somewhat big part of the reason many big companies have gone downhill in the past - overlooking details and getting sloppy, valuing quantity over quality too much, etc. :)


Edited by Just_One_Question, 06 September 2017 - 07:28 PM.


#6 britechguy

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 07:12 PM

One of the main reasons for my having made the choice to leave computing was the endemic attitude among management (regardless of where) when it comes to software development, "There's always time to do it over but there's never time to do it right in the first place."

 

That, combined with the idea that deadlines, arbitrary in the vast majority of cases, are more important than product quality and I'd had enough.

 

I want "very good" at a minimum on the first public release.  It usually doesn't take that much longer to get from "held together with chewing gum" and "fairly airtight," either.  That's just not the way that those in charge have ever done it and there's no sign of this changing.  If anything, it's gotten worse.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#7 Just_One_Question

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 07:36 PM

Which is weird. One would think that folks would wait out for a better product and thus companies wouldn't be pushed to always try to get first, but who knows, I haven't actually seen statistics. I assume that others think like me because of abandoning MySpace for Facebook, ICQ and mIRC for Skype, Internet Explorer for Mozilla Firefox, Nokia for Apple, etc. These were all later products and not the first through the door, but were at the time of release, let's say, 20% better and thus everyone gradually shifted to them. I suppose managers like that want to get noticed and prove results quickly and in their hastiness compromise quality too much, as, since you said, putting a little bit more effort is not that hard.:)






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