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Is it too late to get into the IT field in the mid 30's?


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#1 Stoneheart

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 06:30 PM

I'm thinking of switching careers and get into the IT field. Is it too late to do that in the mid 30's? I understand that many companies prefer to hire people in their 20's. Has anyone here made the switch into IT at an older age and what can I look forward to in terms of salary?

I either want to go into the network side, security or even software development.

 

Thanks!



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#2 Just_One_Question

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 06:32 PM

Don't know about the details, but switching fields in your 30s or older, or any age is not too late. Pursue your interests and good luck!:)



#3 Orange Blossom

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 06:46 PM

Of course it's not too late.  Dad started practicing law at age 56!  I know someone else who started a non-profit at the age of 75, and was very successful.  I have no idea about what salary to expect, but don't let that deter you.  Keep your options open, and don't sell yourself short. I also note that it's not a requirement for a company to know your age at the outset.  In fact, that detail doesn't need to come out until you do paperwork for background checks, if required, or filling out documents upon hire. Lots of folks think I'm way younger than I am.  When applying or interviewing, be sure to highlight any cross-transferable skills from your other work experience.  Younger folks may not have those skills.  You also want to highlight how recent your IT training is.  One reason companies may be hiring younger folks is because their education is more recent.  So, get the cutting-edge IT training, and highlight all the positive experience you have from your other work experience.  Do your best to get internships while getting the training too, that leads to good job possibilities also.


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#4 hamluis

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 06:49 PM

The "IT field" is very broad language and any desire to enter it (or any other field of work) presupposes the possession of skills or a path to such...that will successfully enable one to enter the competition for jobs.

 

I believe that those who have trod that path recently...would be the best source of information on such.

 

Louis



#5 britechguy

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 07:55 PM

I would say that it is not an issue of age, "many companies prefer to hire people in their 20's," as much as it is of cost.  

 

The trend in most industries, and specifically in IT, is to hire the least expensive alternative in pure dollars, which is generally new graduates.  If you are a bit older that will likely mean little, and, in fact, may be a slight advantage, provided your salary requirements are congruent with those of new graduates who are typically younger than yourself.

 

I have declined several jobs because the companies did not wish to pay for experience and I have lost others after two or three rounds of interviewing that went quite well because, in my 50s and with decades of experience which I expect to be paid for, my younger competitors are cheaper.

 

Employers should love the combination of maturity and economy of salary if my experiences over the past 5 to 10 years are any indication.


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#6 softeyes

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 10:52 PM

Coupled with the good information already provided. Here are some links with data analysis that's been done in the industry. See if this is any help for you.
 
 
 
 
 
 
UK
 
 
 
 


#7 chushkin

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 11:45 PM

I'm always saying to myself that it's never too late. if you have inspiration and interested in it, why not? at least you try, but I would not switch to another field in 360 degree cuz who knows maybe it's not for ya?



#8 imhome

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 12:47 AM

Don't know about the details, but switching fields in your 30s or older, or any age is not too late. Pursue your interests and good luck! :)

yeah I'm totally agree with you. no matter how old you are, if you have ambitions that would be quite enough



#9 britechguy

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 08:50 AM

I'm always saying to myself that it's never too late. if you have inspiration and interested in it, why not? at least you try, but I would not switch to another field in 360 degree cuz who knows maybe it's not for ya?

 

And a big "Amen!!" to that observation about the 360 (although you mean 180, 360 brings you right back to where you were).  I've done it, and don't regret it, but did a lot of research before going that route.

 

IT is definitely not for everyone.  That's not meant as discouragement, either.   It's just well worth doing something like dipping your toes into the coursework pool before diving in headlong to a career switch of any kind.  Careers in "hot fields" always hold a certain degree of allure but if you either hate what you're doing (even if you're great at it) or struggle in the job you really don't want it.


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#10 Just_One_Question

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 09:36 AM

And just to add, aspiring people oftentimes forget that by definition most workers in a given field as a whole are mediocre at their job, so you don't have to be among the very best to switch fields. For example, I've gone some years ago to the Wall Street Oasis forums and asked what it takes to get into the finance sector in the US and everyone just filled my head up with all those super qualifications - Ivy League school, background internship at a large hedge fund, a letter of recommendation from the President, etc., but whereas I cannot be certain, I am pretty sure such things hold truth only if you aspire to go into the very top of the branch outright.

You can switch your field if you have enough knowledge about it and are ambitious, as I am sure you do, and learn the ropes around it as you're going. :)


Edited by Just_One_Question, 28 August 2017 - 09:37 AM.





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