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Which antivirus to buy? Internet banking and important files


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#1 arkol

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 02:38 AM

There are  tons of articles on the net and that left me confused. I need a good one, I have some important files in my laptop and i often transact money with my laptop through internet banking.



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#2 waveydavey

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 02:59 AM

I have Kaspersky on my computer,it has banking facility's ans well with it.



#3 quietman7

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 06:34 AM

If you don't mind paying, I generally recommend ESET NOD32 Anti-Virus or Emsisoft Anti-Malware as they are effective but leave a small footprint...meaning they are not intrusive and do not utilize a lot of system resources which slow down performance. ESET and Emsisoft Anti-Malware also have the added advantage of blocking the installation of most Potentially Unwanted Programs (PUPs) (such as adware, spyware, unwanted toolbars, browser hijackers) if you enable that feature. The most recent release of Emsisoft Anti-Malware includes an Anti-Malware Anti-Ransomware module.

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See my comments in Choosing an Anti-Virus Program as to why I recommend ESET and Emsisoft.
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#4 britechguy

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 10:04 AM

The questions also need to be asked:

 

What platform are you running on?  (Windows 7, 8, 8.1, 10 or something else)

 

What is your history of infection with any sort of virus or malware?  (If you have not been infected, ever, or not been infected more than, say, once or twice a decade, and that detection was promptly dispatched by whatever software you were using, it's likely you follow most of the recommendations in quietman7's excellent resource:  Quietman7's Best Practices for Safe Computing).

 

Also see his post:  What you must understand regarding computer security

 

If you do not have a history of repeated infections it is not likely that it will matter much at all which antivirus or security suite you use because it will very likely never be called upon to clean up after you.

 

Your own personal history is the one best indicator of your likelihood of contracting infections (unless you make a concerted effort to follow the best practices, or at least most of them.  Even I don't follow all of them, but apparently enough, as I truly cannot recall the last time any machine I own has had an infection of any sort).


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#5 Daniel_Boringcliffe

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 12:28 PM

It depends on what you do on the computer. The basic protection (windows firewall, windows defender) are already good enough for an average person. I am not sure of which AV you should buy if you want to but I am sure which ones you shouldn't: Bitdefender - poor compatibility with the windows itself in the past and now, therefore unstable and buggy on some machines

                                                        Comodo - pretty much the same as Bitdefender, with the difference being that Bit can actually detect script-kiddie malware

                                                        Symantec - issues in the past, I am not sure of its current situation, although any type of a serious issue is a red flag - incompetent developers

 

Also consider not buying an AV with a low market share since it may be less effective that its popular competitors. AV Comparatives charts are a good start for choosing one.

 

Just to back up quietman7's statement - Eset, nor Emsisoft have the best detection ratios, although detection tests are not all that is important. I am not up for starting an argument in here but I'll bash Bitdefender once again - it has exceedingly good detections but it is unstable and it can cause issues. Eset won't. 

 

Beware that a lot of  AV's come bundled with crap these days. Remove all of the following if it appears with the AV :

 

browser extensions - literally useless, also they have the ability to log your browsing history 

VPN's - find an alternative if you want it, the AV VPN's are made to squeeze as much cash out of you as possible, including selling your data

browsers - the classic ones have better and more dedicated developer team, stick to them (Chrome, FF,etc.)

password managers - just don't use them unless you don't value your passwords. If you can't memorize them then write them down on a paper and hide it well.

                                                                                                                                                 


Edited by Daniel_Boringcliffe, 26 August 2017 - 12:45 PM.


#6 quietman7

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 04:19 PM

...Also consider not buying an AV with a low market share since it may be less effective that its popular competitors. AV Comparatives charts are a good start for choosing one.

There are several reputable labs which test the effectiveness of major anti-virus programs and security suites to include AV-Comparatives.org, Virus Bulletin Comparative Tests, AV-Test.org, NSS Labs Consumer Anti-Malware Products Group Test Report, Anti-Malware Test Lab, MRG-Effitas, etc.

These kinds of comparative testing results will vary depending on a variety of factors to include but not limited to who conducted the testing, what they were testing for (type of threats, attack vectors, exploits), what versions of anti-virus software was tested, what type of scanning engine was used, and the ability to clean or repair. There are no universally predefined set of standards or criteria for testing which means each test will yield different results. As such, you need to look for detailed information about how the tests were conducted, the procedures used, objectivity and data results. Read Anti-Malware Testing Standards Organization: AMTSO Fundamental Principles of Testing.

Each security vendor uses their own testing/analysis methodology to identify various types of malware so the detection results are not always the same.Some of the testing criteria and standards may even be misleading.

...for some unknown reason...the renowned German test lab AV-TEST has quietly (there was no warning) modified its certification process. The changes mean that the certificates produced by the new rules are, to put it mildly, pretty useless for evaluating the merits of different AV products...With AV-TEST’s new certification standards, the onus is on the user to carefully investigate the actual results of each individual test…they may find that a product that blocked 99.9% of attacks has the same “certification” as a product that only blocked 55%.

Comparative testing: A bit of background for the uninitiated
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