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SSD Worry


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9 replies to this topic

#1 sceadugenga

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 08:44 PM

I recently added an SSD drive along with a large HDD to my PC (Windows 7) and am really pleased with it.

 

Then a "friend" comes along and scares me with some talk of SSD life expectancy.

 

Apparently this is based on write and delete count, I wont pretend I understand it.

What I'd like to do is move my downloads and Dropbox folders to the HDD to reduce traffic on the SSD.

This should be fairly simple?

 

Will this effect downloads and Dropbox activity?

 

 



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 08:53 PM

Although the article is a few years old it is still valid. I don't believe you have anything to worry about. MLC is better than TLC

 

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-1751041/mlc-tlc-ssd-life-span-reliability-models.html

 

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2856052/grueling-endurance-test-blows-away-ssd-durability-fears.html

 



#3 jonuk76

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 10:26 PM

I wouldn't worry excessively. Really, SSD's are now a fairly mature technology, and are mostly quite reliable.  They're designed for 100's of terabytes of writes.  Utilities can estimate drive health, so you can keep an eye on wear.  Make sure to optimise the drive regularly.  If you do want to re-direct your "Downloads" folder to a location on your HDD, that's easily done.

 

Create a new folder on your HDD to download to (e.g. called "Downloads")

Right-click the current Downloads folder. ...
Click the Location tab.
Click the Move button.
In the resulting dialog box, point it at your new Downloads folder you just created.
After you click OK, click Yes to move your files.
This should create a re-direct so anything that points at your "Downloads" or "My Downloads" folder in your user directory should be re-directed to your new folder on the HDD.

 

I'm presuming you configure Dropbox software to move the synced folder, but I don't currently use Dropbox so I'm not sure on that.


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#4 sceadugenga

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 02:20 AM

Thanks for the advice



#5 dropbear

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 04:47 AM

as stated, but to confirm/re-iterate, 

SSD's definitely have a limit to the read/write cycles per cell and they were originally advertised as having a 'so many years' life expectancy.

those units are now hitting that expectancy and still going strong, so although I wouldn't call it scare-mongering, it may have been a tad overkill.

 

you do need to do all you can to minimise as much as possible and excessive, unnecessary I/O, for example, defragging is a complete no-no.

and move Document, Downloads, Desktop, Pictures, Videos and Music to a HDD if possible.

and user temp file and system temp files (done via the Environment Variables in Control Panel) and pagefile, and turn off hibernation file, and services that are not needed once you go SSD.

 

a good little utility called SSD Fresh will help with most of that.

also the major SSD manufactures provide a free utility to also further optimise performance, so check out the website for your manufacturer.


Instead of reading this, why not do a backup of your PC.

You won't regret it.


#6 garioch7

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 04:55 AM

sceadugenga:

 

Just to add to what has been said, I purchased a Samsung 850 Pro 1  TB SSD a couple of years ago to replace my Drive C: RAID0 array of twin 600 GB WD Velociraptors.  The drive came with a 10-year warranty from Samsung.  You can't get that kind of warranty on a mechanical hard drive.

 

I have all of my programs and files on that drive, so it is written and read all of the time.  It works like a charm and comes with Samsung Magician software to optimize and monitor it.  I also followed the Samsung recommendation and allocated ten percent of the drive to "over-provisioning."

 

Having had this SSD, I would never go back to the mechanical drive for my OS drive.  The speed is phenomenal.

 

Just my two cents.  Have a great day.

 

Regards,

-Phil


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#7 sceadugenga

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 11:24 PM

Thanks Phil, I didn't manage to move the downloads folder so decided to leave it where it is.

If I "only" get ten years out of it I'll buy a new one... :bananas:



#8 Kilroy

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 02:44 PM

Read the SSD Endurance Experiment, you'll feel better.  In the early days of SSDs there were issues of limited writes.  These days, those worries are all in the past.  The worst drive in the experiment lasted for over 100TB of writes.



#9 Drillingmachine

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 03:08 PM

Read the SSD Endurance Experiment, you'll feel better.  In the early days of SSDs there were issues of limited writes.  These days, those worries are all in the past.  The worst drive in the experiment lasted for over 100TB of writes.


Totally useless test as they missed data retention. It's possible SSD can "last" huge amount of writes but data is readable for about 1 second. Even if that time is one week, drive still quite useless. So although SSD may be writeable, it can be practically useless. Specs say consumer SSD's should hold data readable for one year.

Edited by Drillingmachine, 05 September 2017 - 03:08 PM.


#10 cat1092

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 04:54 AM

All I have to add to the Topic is this, purchased my first SSD (128GB Crucial m4) in 2012, several more were to follow over the next few years, to include three NVMe based models, and have yet to have any 'die' on me, or any issue for that matter. :)

 

However, I've always taken the step that jonuk76 posted, having downloads, documents, OneDrive, Google Drive & Dropbox folders directed to a HDD to preserve writes & don't create virtual machines on any. I keep all optimized, as well as followed sound advise by making proper changes in the registry & other performance tweaks, to this day, none of my SSD's has reached the 97% mark, all between 98-99% useful lifespan remaining. A specific date or year or failure is difficult to measure, the wear cycle shown is assuming one's using the same computer all of the time & having the same number of writes per day. If using multiple computers, as I do, how can one place a time on exhaustion of the SSD's lifespan? :question:

 

Another step I take to keep a SSD running at peak performance is booting into the UEFI (or BIOS) monthly & allowing to stand there for no less than 12 hours, this forces an extended garbage collection, otherwise known as GC, maybe that's why my luck has been so good. :)

 

At any rate, today's SSD's have a much lower failure rate than HDD's, otherwise Samsung wouldn't extend a 10 year warranty on their 850 Pro line, and I believe SanDisk also produced a model with the same, maybe to compete. If these OEM's didn't have confidence in their SSD's, they'd not have provided such generous warranties, no HDD OEM has done the same.

 

All of this stated, am about to pull the trigger on my next SSD, a MLC based Crucial BX300 240GB that's combines with SLC write acceleration for $89.99 shipped, need a spare, as I just installed my last unused one (Samsung 120GB 850 EVO) in my latest build & even after over a year stored, performs great for it's size class. :)

 

http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/CT240BX300SSD1#productDetails

 

http://www.crucial.com/wcsstore/CrucialSAS/pdf/product-flyer/crucial-bx300-ssd-productflyer-a4-en.pdf

 

Here's the pic of the Sammy's performance in my latest build, consisting of mostly used along with a two new components (PSU & MB). On writes, outperforms every 2.5" SSD owned other than my 850 Pro, amazing for a 120GB SSD that I expected less of. :thumbsup:

 

yntNSvQ.png

 

Fear HDD's, not SSD's, which is why in my best rigs, have a 2TB WD Gold (Enterprise Class) HDD installed, has an industry leading 5 year warranty & a 128MB cache, double that of the consumer oriented Black series & the writes are almost as fast as the Crucial m4 at 204 MB/sec.

 

And should a SSD die, since I perform regular drive images with Macrium Reflect, can easily replace w/out having to reinstall everything. No big deal, as larger capacity models costs less now than when I purchased most of the ones owned, can bite the bullet. :)

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 06 September 2017 - 04:59 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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