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Looking For Confirmation This is a Scam (computer infected, etc.)


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#1 EllenJ25

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 05:32 PM

Newbie to the board here.  (Used to use worldstart as a resource for many years quite a few years back.  That site appears to be no longer in existence?)
 
I just spoke with a friend (honest!) who tells me (via text) that she turned on her computer and it told her she "had a virus brewing."  She called the # listed:  866-809-9055 (Toshiba/Microsoft support #) and they of course asked for money (and she gave them some) and gave her a support phone # to call of 888-319-9931.  She was told she is getting Avast premier anti virus software.  Was told she had a trojan.  When I heard this after the fact I queried the 866-809-9055, and got hits that it is a scam and recommendations to "not give them money." There was a comment by a poster, "Had to stop payment."  The "support" number of 888-319-9931 pulls up a list of individual people, each with a different phone #.  ??  I am more computer saavy than my friend so am recalling that red flashing message pop-up that she must have clicked on believing it to be legit. 
 
Is the consensus that she is being scammed and that she should try to stop payment?  I have no idea whether she banks online or not.  If she gave a credit/debit card #, they could wipe her out immediately or nickle and dime her to death.  When I heard what was going on, I asked for the phone number to query it. 
 
Appreciate any confirmation or cautions that it may indeed be legit.   
 
Thanks in advance,
 
EllenJ25
 
 
 


Edited by hamluis, 21 August 2017 - 05:59 PM.
Moved from Am I Infected to Gen Security - Hamluis.


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#2 britechguy

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 10:29 PM

Yes, she was scammed.

 

No legitimate computer support company ever cold calls you to tell you that "they've found an infection/problem on your computer" because there is no way for them to know this.

 

You never grant remote access to your computer to a technician unless you initiated a support call to a company you do business with or a technician is calling you in response to same, in which case the technician will identify not only the company they're with but will be able to supply you with the case or incident number that was assigned to your case/incident and given to you when you initiated contact with support.

 

My last service call was reviving a computer that had been infected using this sort of scam and was messed up so badly that the user could not even log in to the machine anymore.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

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#3 saw101

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 01:25 AM

Your friend should immediately contact her bank/credit card services, & explain the situation. Any bank with good customer service should cancel the transaction & issue her a new card.


Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.


#4 JoshRoss

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 07:45 AM

Unfortunate to hear that this situation happened. I will second peoples opinions on this topic, full out scam. as britechguy mentioned, no vendor or pretty much any software developer will ever place pop-ups claiming to call them and fix the issue. Hopefully, the situation turns out alright, make sure she immediately calls the bank to stop the transaction.



#5 quietman7

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 07:02 PM

You may want to read: Beware of Phony Emails & Tech Support Scams for more information about how these scams work.
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#6 EllenJ25

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 03:18 PM

Thank you, everyone, for your responses.  I appreciate you took the time to read and respond.  I was told she doesn't have any banking info on the computer.  To clarify for other future readers, this was not a cold call by someone.  My friend got the pop-up and got the blinking message that her computer may be infected and proceeded to respond via the 866 #.   I've shared my concerns with her, but she seems to think she has it under control (she is giving them money) so therefore there really isn't anything I can do to convince her this so-called company may not be legit.  I've encouraged her that if she encounters it again, the best thing to do is to take it to a local computer store to remove the virus.  She did not come to me for help, but explained what she was doing, which is when I asked for the details, etc.  Thus, I am providing unsolicited advice.  If I had heard what was going on sooner, I may have been able to nip it in the bud.  

 

I agree completely with all suggestions about what not to do.  

 

Again, thanks again for your time, recommendations and the link. 

 

 

EllenJ25



#7 britechguy

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 03:25 PM

Ellen,

 

          As an addition, then, add no legitimate computer support company will ever communicate with you first, be it a cold call, a pop-up telling you that your computer has an infection, or by e-mail saying something dire is wrong with your computer.

 

          If you ever receive any sort of communication from anyone that you have not made contact with first, and that can provide you with a case number or similar from that contact then do not engage them further.   If it's a call, hang up.   If it's a pop-up, close it and immediately scan your machine with whatever antivirus and antimalware (or combination) program[s] you have on your computer and let them remove what they find, as one or the other will almost certainly find something.   If it's an e-mail message mark it as spam so that your e-mail provider will have this information to add to their scanning database as well as having it added to your own.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 





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