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Unable to unsubscribe from Spam


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#1 Jaycan

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Posted 17 August 2017 - 09:53 PM

Below is a typical only (of dozens of Spam) that I am not able to unsubscribe from or just stop them coming from various real and fake companies.

You receive this email because you subscribed to Streamail or one of the dabatases associated to Streamail
- 7950 NW 53rd Street, Suite 337 - 33166 Miami, Florida.
If you no longer wish to receive offers from us, visit this link to unsubscribe or write an email to Unsubscribe

This is just typical and the "this link" is not a link while emails to Unsubscribe are generally sent back as "Cannot deliver".

 

Anybody can help with this ??

Thanks..



Acer Computer with LG Monitor and Toshiba Laptop with Windows 7.1

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#2 mightywiz

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 03:23 PM

don't every use the link to unsubscribe from a service!  when you do most of the time you will be removed from that site but then you just confirmed you

are a real person and then you just signed up for 20 different other services.

 

just ignore the messages or block them,  they will go away overtime if you never respond to them.



#3 britechguy

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 04:26 PM

And even if they don't ever go away, be sure to mark them as spam in your e-mail client, too, as this information gets sent back to your e-mail service provider (in most cases, anyway) and ends up being integrated into their own spam filtering.

 

The best thing is to train your e-mail client to recognize messages of this general format as spam by marking them as such.  Unless you actually do anything other than read through the subjects in your spam folder in case of accidental misclassification, you'll never have to see these in their entirety again (or at least very, very rarely will).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#4 Just_One_Question

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 04:36 PM

What the people here said and also if you want to make things drastic, create a whole new e-mail or write a classic snail mail to their address to tell them not to bother you again.:)



#5 britechguy

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 04:41 PM

JOQ:  Sorry, but if what you proposed actually worked the world would have been spam free decades ago.  Spammers communicate in one direction.  And the entities they work for pretty much do, too, when it comes to "customer support" for dissatisfied customers.

 

Ignoring this stuff has proven to be the best defense.

 

Mind you, there are businesses that you may have done business with and accidentally signed up for their e-mailing lists, and they do honor unsubscribe links.  But you already know those businesses and what they send, even if unwanted, is not "classic spam."


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#6 Just_One_Question

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 04:48 PM

Yes, I haven't actually tested what I proposed, but so far I've had great success in unsubscribing from anything marketing-related when it comes to phone calls, not e-mail. They've been surprisingly polite about de-listing me from their databases. E-mail spammers are more impudent in this regard like horse flies. Still, I think it would be kinda funny if someone actually visited their address in person and if not for anything, at least we'll finally know how do spammers look like. :lmao: :)


Edited by Just_One_Question, 18 August 2017 - 04:49 PM.


#7 Jaycan

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 05:16 PM

 

The best thing is to train your e-mail client to recognize messages of this general format as spam by marking them as such.  Unless you actually do anything other than read through the subjects in your spam folder in case of accidental misclassification, you'll never have to see these in their entirety again (or at least very, very rarely will).

The quote I started with is from ONE of the 100 Spam emails I came home to after being away for a week.

 

YAHOO is my email carrier, and identifies these as Spam, but also lists them in my Spam folder.

So I have today 110 Spam items that I want to remove. I will just start to Delete them and put up with the daily 10 various Spam items.

 

Thanks for ideas, but manual deleting is my result ..  :flamethrower:
 



Acer Computer with LG Monitor and Toshiba Laptop with Windows 7.1

Windows 64bit  8.1 - Always fully updated

Firefox / Google Chrome / Internet Explorer Browsers

Usually a home helper here or with friends and nimble fingered ladies who would rather sew or dust, but not clean the bugs out of a computer ...


#8 britechguy

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 05:22 PM

Seriously, why bother?

 

I thought that Yahoo, like Gmail, automatically deletes spam messages older than 30 days.  Of course, that only helps if you're using Yahoo web mail, since I seem to recall that Yahoo is the sole hold-out among the major (or formerly major) providers that only supports POP.


Edited by britechguy, 18 August 2017 - 05:23 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#9 Just_One_Question

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 05:24 PM

Why even a month and not instantly? Is it 30 days just in case an actual important e-mail was wrongfully marked as Spam?



#10 Jaycan

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 05:28 PM

flybuys@xxx102.ctgrnneniresen.eu

This is also typical today (note the .eu ending), and I live in Australia !! Deleted manually from my Spam folder.

 

If I waited 30 days there would be 100's, then I would not have any space on this system !!



Acer Computer with LG Monitor and Toshiba Laptop with Windows 7.1

Windows 64bit  8.1 - Always fully updated

Firefox / Google Chrome / Internet Explorer Browsers

Usually a home helper here or with friends and nimble fingered ladies who would rather sew or dust, but not clean the bugs out of a computer ...


#11 Just_One_Question

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 05:32 PM

Aren't e-mails stored outside your personal system, rather on the e-mail provider's servers?



#12 britechguy

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 08:16 PM

Aren't e-mails stored outside your personal system, rather on the e-mail provider's servers?

 

If one is using IMAP then it's a combination of some subset of recent messages (where you usually define recent in the e-mail client as some number of days) that are kept on both the server and the client, but the remaining ones only have their message headers kept in the e-mail client and the body is fetched on demand if one accesses the message.  This saves a ton of space on the client (read PC, in this case).

 

POP is a different story, and once a message is downloaded from the server and the server retention period ends it exists only on the client.  This is why POP has fallen out of favor when you need to access the same e-mail account(s) from multiple devices.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#13 Just_One_Question

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 08:35 PM

I see. Well, it does make sense. I oftentimes wonder what type, or rather how many computers, be it servers or some other type that I am not aware of, do huge companies like Google or Facebook have in order to store the massive amounts of data that they posses and keep virtually forever, especially in this day and age of rather lots of graphic materials and video clips. I guess, they maybe both have a lot of storage space and computers and they have a top-notch compression algorithm - for example, I've noticed that once you upload a photo to Facebook and then download it back, it comes with slightly lower quality and about half the size the original one was (even though the resolution is the same as the original one you uploaded). But anyways, don't want to hi-jack OP's topic.:)






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