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Dual Boot Issue after deleting Linux Partition


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#1 paul88ks

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 11:51 PM

Hello All- I have an issue I've never come across before-

 

I had a dual-boot system Windows 10/Linux Mint installed on one 256 Gig SSD. I purchased a second SSD to install Linux by itself,so I would have Windows and Linux on separate drives. When I did the install the first time, I put the bootloader for Linux in the Windows Bootloader. That went fine with no issues. O, and I should mention here that it is a UEFI interface.

 

The problem is this. I deleted the Linux partition,and attempted to reinstall Linux on the second SSD,but the LIVE DVD will not boot- it goes to a GRUB prompt. I assume this is because of where I placed the bootloader when I installed Linux the first time.

 Anyway , what I want to know is,can I boot the Live DVD from a GRUB Prompt,or am I going to have to reinstall Windows from scratch? I can do that, it's a new machine,but trying to avoid it if possible? Thanks. Paul



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#2 buddy215

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 03:04 AM

If you didn't delete any Windows 10 files...just wrecked the boot MBR...then you should be able to repair the MBR.

Restore, Fix, Repair Master Boot Record (MBR) in Windows

 

You may need some info on installing Windows 10 and Linux on separate hdds.

Dual Boot Windows 10 and Linux Ubuntu on Separate Hard Drives - Ask Ubuntu


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#3 cat1092

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 05:28 AM

buddy215, thanks to the link for that article! :thumbup2:

 

Now I know how to install Linux on a separate SSD (or HDD) & if removed, won't affect my Windows install, would only need to delete the 'Ubuntu' option in the UEFI. :)

 

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#4 paul88ks

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 04:26 PM

I did those steps via a different article,but not in that order. Also,didn't do this step - bootsect /nt60 SYS or bootsect /nt60 ALL - so I will try it again according to this procedure. Hopefully this will remove the grub bootloader in the Windows bootfile!



#5 paul88ks

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 04:46 PM

Ok - I tried all those steps. The reference to UBUNTU is still in the bootloader- any other options?



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 04:56 PM

If you have UEFI then there is no legacy MBR. I'm not sure it would work but you could install EasyBCD, free for home use, and remove the Ubuntu reference. if that does not work then a couple of other things to try.

 

With a Windows 10 install disk do a startup repair. It could take up to three attempts to restore the EFI partition to default. Opening an elevated command prompt and typing bcdedit will show the contents of BCD.

 

Manually rebuild the EFI boot loader per the below guide. It's for Windows 8 but the same steps hold for Windows 10

 

http://www.fixedbyvonnie.com/2013/12/how-to-repair-the-efi-bootloader-in-windows-8/



#7 Guest_philbo_*

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 07:08 PM

Ok - I tried all those steps. The reference to UBUNTU is still in the bootloader- any other options?

I'm not sure if at this stage you're able to boot into a live usb or disc, but if you are and you just want to completely remove the Ubuntu bootloader then here's what I always do...
 
1) Boot into a live usb that includes the GNOME disk utility ("Disks").
2) Use Disks to mount the EFI partition.
3) Open the file manager which will now show the contents of the EFI partition.
4) Delete the Ubuntu folder inside the EFI folder.
5) Boot into the computer's UEFI settings and remove the Ubuntu boot option from the list.


#8 paul88ks

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 08:23 PM

If you have UEFI then there is no legacy MBR. I'm not sure it would work but you could install EasyBCD, free for home use, and remove the Ubuntu reference. if that does not work then a couple of other things to try.

 

With a Windows 10 install disk do a startup repair. It could take up to three attempts to restore the EFI partition to default. Opening an elevated command prompt and typing bcdedit will show the contents of BCD.

 

Manually rebuild the EFI boot loader per the below guide. It's for Windows 8 but the same steps hold for Windows 10

 

http://www.fixedbyvonnie.com/2013/12/how-to-repair-the-efi-bootloader-in-windows-8/

Thanks - I will try that and get back with the results!



#9 paul88ks

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 08:27 PM

 

Ok - I tried all those steps. The reference to UBUNTU is still in the bootloader- any other options?

I'm not sure if at this stage you're able to boot into a live usb or disc, but if you are and you just want to completely remove the Ubuntu bootloader then here's what I always do...
 
1) Boot into a live usb that includes the GNOME disk utility ("Disks").
2) Use Disks to mount the EFI partition.
3) Open the file manager which will now show the contents of the EFI partition.
4) Delete the Ubuntu folder inside the EFI folder.
5) Boot into the computer's UEFI settings and remove the Ubuntu boot option from the list.

 

That's the problem- I can't boot into a LIVE CD or USB . When I try to do that, I get a GRUB prompt. I thought maybe I could use GRUB to boot into the LIVE CD,but I don't know how to do that. one of the GRUB commands is "BOOT" but then it tell me to load the kernel first. Guess I should study GRUB command lines more!



#10 Guest_philbo_*

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 08:43 PM

So when you boot into the computer's UEFI settings, are all these boot options listed?
 
1 Ubuntu
2 Windows Bootloader
3 USB Storage Device (or disc)
 
And it's when you select the usb or disc that you receive the GRUB prompt?


#11 paul88ks

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 09:09 PM

 

So when you boot into the computer's UEFI settings, are all these boot options listed?
 
1 Ubuntu
2 Windows Bootloader
3 USB Storage Device (or disc)
 
And it's when you select the usb or disc that you receive the GRUB prompt?

 

Basically - Yes 


Edited by paul88ks, 16 August 2017 - 09:10 PM.


#12 Guest_philbo_*

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 09:14 PM

In that case, the most likely cause would seem to be the live media.

 

How wide a range of ISOs, discs and USB sticks have you tried?



#13 paul88ks

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 09:27 PM

In that case, the most likely cause would seem to be the live media.

 

How wide a range of ISOs, discs and USB sticks have you tried?

it's possible- I could burn another ISO and try a different USB stick,but it's the same one I used when I first installed Linux- worth a shot anyways-



#14 paul88ks

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 09:52 PM

I am still so unfamiliar with UEFI and EFI that I probably need to do some serious woodshedding on the subject! I'm an old school MBR kinda guy,so all this is new to me! When I installed Linux in the old days, I would put the bootloader in the same partition as Linux. This time , I just placed it in the Windows bootloader. Grub is still in the .efi file obviously even though I deleted the Linux partition. Is there a way to edit the .efi boot file?



#15 paul88ks

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 10:43 PM

SUCCESS!   Thanks for all the help guys! Here's what I did to correct the issue.

 

1.Downloaded and installed Easy BCD - I listed Ubuntu even though it wasn't present in the bootloader settings due to EFI mode.

2.I rebooted and opened Easy BCD again. Now there were two entries for UBUNTU. I deleted both of them.!

3. I downloaded a new ISO of Linux Mint 18.2 and burned the ISO to disc.

4.Set boot priority to UEFI DVD

5. Booted up and it booted right into the Live DVD!

 

On installation, I placed the bootloader for Linux in the Windows Bootloader and everything worked beautifully!

And of course,be sure to turn off Secure Boot in the BIOS.

Like I said earlier, UEFI is kind of new to me,so I will be doing a bit of reading! Paul






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