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Need to receive emails as fast as possible


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#1 mymaus1

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:44 PM

I don’t know if this is possible but I need to figure out a way to receive my emails as quickly as possible – ideally, less than a second after they are delivered to the mail server. I currently use 3 email addresses (a gmail, a yahoo and one from my ISP – Spectrum). I could use any one of those or, if I could get the email faster by subscribing to another email service, I would do that as long as there was a trial period where I could test it.  I don’t know if it makes a difference speed wise, but the most important emails I get are from lower Manhattan. I’d also be willing to buy software to accomplish this as well (again, I’d want a trial period). Any thought at all on this would be appreciated.



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:52 PM

Generally the speed of receipt of a message that's arrived on the server is controlled by one thing only:  how frequently the e-mail client or other interface does send/receive polling of the server.

 

I know of no e-mail client or app that will poll once every three seconds, and I doubt that your e-mail service provider would be very happy if their entire client base were doing so or no one would end up being able to get their e-mail.

 

For those interfaces where you can, you can set the polling interval down to less than 5 minutes, but I've never seen much less than that.  Most on mobile devices don't allow for resetting this interval, but do allow you to force a send/receive sync with the server manually.  For example, on Android devices using the Gmail app a swipe down on the main inbox screen will trigger a send/receive with a small white circle with a green "activity whirler" inside denoting progress.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 mymaus1

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 08:18 PM

Thanks for your QUICK reply!!  I'm not well versed technically but when I started searching for something like this myself, there was a lot of talk about "push" technology. As I understand it....having "push" would force the mail server to "immediately" push new emails to the client and would, theoretically avoid polling it on a constant basis. If this kind of thing actually exists maybe my question would be what is the fastest of the "push" email clients and/or servers?

 

Also, I know this is probably a newbie question but...I know the internet is fast, but if my mail server was in the building next to the server of the sender wouldn't that speed things up (even it it was by fractions of a second)?



#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 05:40 PM

The answer to your last part is 'probably not'.

 

Essentially what happens when you send an email (or someone sends you one) is that it is broken down into separate packets which are then shoved out to the world. The packets are reassembled at your ISP's servers and when the last one arrives only then will you get the notification. Since each packet can take a different route around the internet you are dependent on the routing of the last one.

 

The email system is normally fast, but it is not instantaneous.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#5 mymaus1

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 09:31 AM

Good point Chris. Thanks for responding.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 12:36 PM

And to add to Chris's entirely accurate observation, sometimes (usually rare occasions) it's far "less almost instantaneous" than others.  I have had the very occasional e-mail message be hung up for hours or days before I've received it.  It's unusual, but it happens.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#7 softeyes

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 01:44 PM

Hi mymaus1!

 

No guarantee about speed of email delivery, you might want to give POP PEEPER a try. One individual that I speak with from the USA to the UK uses this software and tends to receive notification quite quickly that my email has been pushed through.

 

Information here from emusoft: http://www.esumsoft.com/products/pop-peeper/

 

Again, I have not tested the speed, IMO it can't hurt to try?






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