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Win 10 OEM or retail?


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#1 frldyz

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 05:24 AM

I'm doing 2 builds right now.
1 w/ Linux the other Win 10.

I purchased Win 10 OEM from a seller on ebay.
I did not know the difference @ the time vs OEM vs retail.

Do I have this right:
OEM: 
1. Microsoft owns your copy of Windows not you. 
2. Tech support. 
3. Can only be installed 1x. Cannot be installed on a latter date on a different computer.

Retail: 
1. You are considered the builder of the computer and own the copy of Windows not Microsoft.
2. No tech support.
3. Can be installed on a diffferent computer if needed in the future.

Do I have that all correct?

*With this build I am doing with Windows 10 OEM once installed is that it? I thought I read the MOBO I originally install it with is the only MOBO it an be installed on. Therefore if upgrading/building a computer in the future with a differant MOBO will NOT work. Is this correct? If I upgrade my MOBO or do a complete different build in the future I would need to use Windows retail?

* I want to install a copy of Windows 10 on a laptop.
1. If I install Windows OEM on a laptop that will NEVER have upgraded components in the future can I only install it 1x?
2. In the future what if I wipe/erase the SSD I install Windows 10 OEM on. Can I reinstall Windows 10 OEM back onto this SSD. It will still have all the original components and the same MOBO. 
3. Once installed If I wipe/erase the SSD I originally installed on too bad it cannot be reinstalled. I would need to purchase anther copy of Windows to reinstall on.

I just want to know if I should return Windows 10 OEM and buy Windows 10 retail.

thanks everyone



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#2 Platypus

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 06:05 AM

Well, number 3 in Retail is right, so if you want to transfer the installation to a completely different computer in the future, use Retail.

Edit: a more detailed response:

1. There's no difference in any ownership between OEM and Retail as concerns the installation of Windows on your computer. In either case you "own" a license to install and operate Windows on one computer.

The EULA for both can be compared:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/Useterms/OEM/Windows/10/UseTerms_OEM_Windows_10_English.htm

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/Useterms/Retail/Windows/10/UseTerms_Retail_Windows_10_English.htm

1.(builder) & 2. These are around the wrong way. Whoever installs OEM Windows on a computer is regarded as the system builder, and the system builder is required to sell the system to a third party and is required to provide Tech Support for the purchaser of the computer.

https://dpcenter.microsoft.com/en/Windows/License/cp-Windows-system-builder-licensing-for-personal-use

Many people do install OEM Windows on self-built computers, and just don't worry about the legal technicality that a self-built system should carry a retail license.

3. The OEM license cannot be transferred to a different computer, but that doesn't mean it can only be physically installed once. If a clean installation needs to be done on the same system, it will activate again (within limits, I've heard 30 times?). If system peripherals are replaced or upgraded, (RAM, video card), this is not normally an issue. Replacement of core system components, CPU & mainboard, can only legitimately be done to repair a failure, not to upgrade the system, which would breach the license conditions. It may be necessary to contact Microsoft, either on the automated system or for manual activation, in the case of a repair.

The retail license can be transferred between computers, whilst only ever being concurrently installed on a single system, or the computer can have a major upgrade which makes it appear to be a different computer, without breaching the conditions of the license.

Edited by Platypus, 12 August 2017 - 07:54 AM.

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#3 britechguy

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 09:58 AM

Microsoft isn't precisely clear on the Windows 10 Activation Help Page, either, with regard to the replacement of a motherboard.  It's quite clear that you can do this and be able to reactivate your Windows 10 Digital License (formerly Digital Entitlement) but not whether that replacement must be a strict replacement with like kind or an upgrade.   I suspect that since you have to go through some manual "make a phone call" type steps that either will be supported if you can give whatever proof it is that they need/want that this is the same machine and you were (and are) licensed with Windows 10 for it.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#4 Just_One_Question

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 11:24 AM

It's impossible to resolve the motherboard issue as it's kind of a paradox - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ship_of_Theseus


Edited by Just_One_Question, 12 August 2017 - 11:24 AM.


#5 britechguy

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 11:39 AM

It's impossible to resolve the motherboard issue as it's kind of a paradox - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ship_of_Theseus

 

Er, no, because that paradox revolves around *all* of a given object's components being replaced.  (Which virtually never happens for complex "machinery" except in thought experiments).


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#6 Just_One_Question

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 12:15 PM

Yeah, I suppose you are correct. I thought, since the OS license is tied to just one computer, would it be still considered the same computer by the OS if you changed the motherboard for a new, but the same model, one? That's why I thought of this paradox. Not too sure if you'd be able to install Windows OEM on it again, as it would view the computer as a different one. I guess, it's all speculation until someone contacts Microsoft and asks them about it.:)



#7 britechguy

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 02:12 PM

Well, based on what Microsoft does say on the activation page it is possible to replace the motherboard and reactivate Windows 10 afterward, but it's also clear that it won't be automatic since, as you note, the automated process won't recognize this as a computer with a digital entitlement.

 

What's interesting, and somewhat indirectly related, is I went through precisely the same thing recently on a computer that was purchased with Windows 10 Pro pre-installed.  For some bizarre reason it would not activate.  However, when I went through the phone activation process, which involves talking to a live person, after a number of gyrations we were able to activate it with little problem.  Why two humans can recognized that this machine is legally licensed but the automated activation process is not remains a mystery.  I just hope that now that it's been activated this issue does not recur when the next major update is applied.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#8 Just_One_Question

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 03:19 PM

Interesting. I'm not too sure when did Microsoft start selling so many different versions with different activation processes of Windows or whether this is a new thing. My guess would be that they haven't fully cleansed the Windows activation process of some of those small, but painful, issues, judging by the somewhat high amount of people that I've seen, including you, having encountered such problems with their Windows activation.

I was pretty surprised, by the way, when I saw about a year ago or so that Windows is being sold digitally on-line. In my mind an OS is still this huge fundamental piece of software that cannot be obtained any other way besides through a disk from the store.:)



#9 britechguy

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 05:37 PM

Well, virtually every OS for PC I've dealt with, including the "bulkiest," which has been Windows, has fitted on a DVD with room to spare for a long time now.  Given the ubiquity of high-speed internet, that amount of data can be downloaded in a time period ranging from mere minutes to overnight.

 

I can recall when Windows came on over 30 (if memory serves) 3.25" floppy disks.   Ah, those were the days!


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#10 Just_One_Question

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 06:41 PM

Over 30!? Astonishing!:)



#11 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 06:46 PM

I think Windows 3.x came on 26 floppies and I have a funny feeling I still have a set somewhere. Don't have a floppy disc drive though !

 

But you are both right, Windows activation can be very vague when it comes to replacing a mobo when it is an OEM licence. I had a mobo/CPU failure just over a year ago on my desktop which was about four years old then. After four years any replacement mobo or CPU is going is not going to be a 'direct replacement' and I was fully expecting I was going to have to get at least a new licence if not a completely new OS. Much to my surprise more or less all I had to do, apart from putting it all together, was install the chipset drivers. Authentication went through automatically and that was with Win 7. Don't ask me why I didn't even have to make a pnone call, but I am not complaining.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#12 britechguy

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 07:14 PM

Chris,

 

        I seem to remember either 35 or 36 disks, and I misspoke last time in that it should have been 1.44" "floppy" disks (which were no longer floppy).  I know it was for later than Windows 3.x but I'm not sure where in the succession these fell.

 

        Even though I'm of an age where it is conceivably possible that I could have dealt with an OS on either 5.25" or 3.25" truly floppy disks, I don't ever recall having done so.  Of course, my early career was far more mainframe (and similar) focused than PC-focused.  In fact, I'd say the majority of my IT career in the employ of others was well over 75% non-PC.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 





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