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What to do next with my new HDD and installing linux


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#1 frldyz

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:13 PM

I wiped and erased a 500gb hdd with parted magic.
The disk prevously had win 10 on it.

I want to install it in a completely seperate build and install linux onto it.
I connected the HDD via USB and HD enclosure.
But it does not show up on my computer.
When I go to disc mangement it is there but unallocated.

What do I do next? This OS will have linux only on it.
1. Can I install it in the build and try to install linux to it via USB?
2. Do I have to partition it with my other computer via win 10?
3. does it need to be partitioned?

I wiped and erased a 500gb hdd with parted magic.
The disk prevously had win 10 on it.

I want to install it in a completely seperate build and install linux onto it.
I connected the HDD via USB and HD enclosure.
But it does not show up on my computer.
When I go to disc mangement it is there but unallocated.

What do I do next? This OS will have linux only on it.
1. Can I install it in the build and try to install linux to it via USB?
2. Do I have to partition it with my other computer via win 10?
3. does it need to be partitioned?



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#2 frldyz

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:16 PM

Do I have to do this on a seperate computer?


#3 sasschary

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:51 PM

Hi frldyz,

 

If you're planning on using this in a new system, why don't you put the hard drive in that system and install it from there? That will eliminate the need to do anything with the hard drive connected to your Windows system.

 

You do not need to do any preparations to the drive before installing Linux on it. In fact, installation would probably be easier if you don't do any preparations to it with Windows.

 

Hopefully this makes sense.

 

Sasschary



#4 frldyz

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 07:59 PM

Hi frldyz,

 

If you're planning on using this in a new system, why don't you put the hard drive in that system and install it from there? That will eliminate the need to do anything with the hard drive connected to your Windows system.

 

You do not need to do any preparations to the drive before installing Linux on it. In fact, installation would probably be easier if you don't do any preparations to it with Windows.

 

Hopefully this makes sense.

 

Sasschary

 

 

Perfect.

That answers my questions completely.

 

1.  Place and connect in new build.

2. Boot PC and install linux onto HDD from there.  Even though the HDD is wiped and has no partitions currently.

 

I can do this?

I don't quit understand partitions.  No matter how many videos I watch or articles I read.

 

This computer that the HD is going in is going to be just for fooling around and getting familiar with linux mint.

Casual browsing play with some of the apps. Thats it.

 

It will not store or hold any sensitive data.

 

So is there any need to partition it?



#5 sasschary

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 08:13 PM

Hi frldyz,

 

Yep, that's how you would install the OS.

 

Any drive which you are using will need to be partitioned. Otherwise it will not be able to actually use any data on it. However, you don't need to do this ahead of time, as the Linux Mint installer should do this automatically for you.

 

As a brief description of partitions, they are basically like divisions of your hard drive. In Windows, partitions are shown as different drive letters. So, for example, I have an external USB hard drive which has two different partitions on it. When I plug it in on my Windows computer, it shows up as two different additional drives, E: and F:. A similar thing will happen in Linux. Your hard drive as a whole will be called something such as /dev/sdb and each partition on it will add a number to the end of that. So, my partitions on my external hard drive would show up on Linux as /dev/sdb1 and /dev/sdb2.

 

Linux will likely use multiple partitions when it installs, and it will probably also ask you how you would like to partition your drive, giving you options such as having a separate /home partition. If you ever want to install a different Linux distribution, this can be nice in that you can use the same /home partition and your documents and some other files will be available in the new distro. Linux will probably also want to make a SWAP partition, which is basically used as an overflow for RAM.

 

I hope that clears up a few things at least, and I will answer any other questions you have as best I can. I would suggest just trying to install Mint, and I'll be here to answer anything you may need help with along the way.

 

Sasschary



#6 jonuk76

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 08:17 PM

The disk needs to ultimately have partitions on it, but you do not need to do it in advance.  The Linux installation program will set up partitions for you.  If you have a raw (partitionless) HDD, Ubuntu (and derivative) installers will generally see the blank disk and ask you whether you want go with the default option which is to install to the empty disk.  This will create one big (EXT4 formatted) partition, and put all Linux directories on it.  It will also create a swap partition (while Windows uses a swap file for virtual memory, Linux normally uses a partition for this purpose). Other distro's have different default options (e.g. OpenSUSE likes to set up separate boot, root and home partitions), but don't worry about this.  Point is, there is generally a default option which should work OK in the situation you describe.

 

The real complications come (and where it pays to know more about partitioning your disk) when you are trying to install more than one OS to the same disk.  


Edited by jonuk76, 11 August 2017 - 08:20 PM.

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#7 sasschary

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Posted 11 August 2017 - 09:02 PM

Sent via PM:

Thanks for all your help and responses to my questions.
It truly is much appreciated.

1. The HDD I erased / wiped came in a 4 year old Toshiba laptop. It came with Win 8. on it. I never used it. Immediately after I got it I installed a 120gb Samsung eve pro SSD. I migrated Win 8 onto the SSD. So I pretty much just swapped the Win 8 OS from the original HDD onto this Samsung SSD.

2. I installed the Win 10 when it was free.

3. The HDD that I took out was just laying in a enclosure. Never realy used. Maybe a couple of pictures but that's it.

4. Im putting together a PC with Linux mint on it. I am using an old PC tower and internals. I had to buy new RAM. I destroyed the original HDD that was in it.

5. I plan to install the HDD that was removed from the laptop into this build and instal Mint on it.

6. I formatted the HDD with Win 10 disk management.

7. I erased the HDD 2x w/ parted magic.

----------------------------

*1. When I connect this wipred/erased drive to my current laptop via usb enclosure. It does not show up. I assume because this is essentially new and blank? But when I go to disc management is shows the disc but it "unallocated".

*2 So it is ok to place and connect this "unallocated" drive into my build. Boot with the linux mint USB. And from here I can install linux mint onto this "unallocated" drive is that right?

*2 You said linux will automatically partition the drive?

*3 Do I need to do anything to the partitions or change their size?

*4 I don't plan to run a Virt. Mach. And I don't plan to run another distro.

**** Right now I just want to play around with mint and go from there.

Thank you for everything

 

 

1-2: Yes. The drive should appear as unallocated in Windows. The Mint installation will automatically partition the drive, which would then remove the unallocated sign in Windows. Unallocated space simply means that it doesn't belong to a partition, and so when Mint creates the partitions it needs, it becomes allocated to those partitions.

 

3: No. The mint installer will do all of that for you.

 

You're very welcome, I'm glad I could help! And I will continue to monitor this thread in case you come up with other questions or any difficulties in installing Mint.

 

Sasschary



#8 Al1000

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 08:10 AM

frldyz, please note that it is against the rules to request help by PM. Thanks.

All help must be provided in the forums or on our IRC Chat channel. We do not allow support to be provided or requested via personal message, email, or remote desktop control programs (Logmein, TeamViewer, etc).

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forum-rules/



#9 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 04:03 PM

@frldyz:-

 

I always find the easiest way to visualize disks & partitions is to think of it like running an office. Your hard drive is like the office building. It contains all your paperwork (your data).....but you want to able to organise it, to make things easier to find.

 

So, you buy some filing cabinets. You can put different stuff in each one, but at least it's now all in one place. (These are your partitions). And, so that you can find individual letters from particular customers, it helps to set up some kind of system inside each cabinet to make it easy to do just that. (That's the format - ext2,3 or 4, FAT32, NTFS - for each partition).

 

Having the data on a storage device (hard drive, SSD, USB stick, eMMC card, SD card, whatever) means the computer knows where to go to find the stuff it needs (the data). Having it in individual filing cabinets makes it easier to locate specific data (like an operating system, or your personal files - documents, pictures, videos, stuff like that). And having some kind of filing system in place makes it possible for your machine to find any one of the hundreds of thousands of files that make up a modern system as & when it needs it!

 

There's nothing particularly mysterious about what goes on. Where the vast majority of people come unstuck is that they find it hard to visualize all this. You can hold a letter (a physical piece of paper) in your hand. You know what it is; you can read it, and you can understand what it's about.

 

You cannot hold a folder/directory/partition in your hand, and look at it. It's simply a mass of electrical binary impulses, whizzing around inside that mysterious 'box of tricks' we call a computer.....and the closest you can get to looking at it is the 2D graphical representation on your screen.

 

This is where it helps to picture it in terms of something you do understand.

 

Hope that helps!

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 13 August 2017 - 04:28 PM.

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