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How often should one manually check for out-of-band Windows 10 updates?


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#1 midimusicman79

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 09:04 AM

Hi all!

 

We are all familiar with "Patch Tuesday", which specifically is the second Tuesday in every month, when Microsoft releases updates to Windows 10 on a regular basis.

 

However, Microsoft also releases out-of-band updates to Windows 10, always in between the above-mentioned updates on a non-regular basis, without a specific date.

 

I know that Windows Update automatically checks for new updates regularly, but I just experienced an out-of-band update that was released six days ago, which I had not yet installed.

 

And hence, my question is as follows;

 

How often should one manually check for out-of-band Windows 10 updates?

 

Thank you very much in advance!

 

Regards,

midimusicman79


MS Win 10 Pro 64-bit, EAM Pro/EEK, MB 3 Free, WPP, SWB Free, CryptoPrevent Free and Unchecky, WFW, FFQ with uBO, Ghostery, Grammarly Free and HTTPS Ew. Acronis TI 2018, K. Sw. Upd. AM-tools: 9-lab RT BETA, AdwCleaner, Auslogics AM, aswMBR, Avira PCC, BD ART, catchme, Cezurity AV, CCE, CKS, ClamWin P., Crystal Sec., DDS, DWCI, EMCO MD, eScan MWAV, ESS/EOS, FGP, FMTB, FRST, F-SOS, FSS, FreeFixer, GMP, GMER, hP BETA, HJT, Inherit, JRT, K. avz4, KVRT, K. TDSSKiller, LSP-Fix, MB 3 Free, MBAR BETA, MA Stinger, NMC, NoBot, NPE, NSS, NVT MRF (NMRF), OTL, PCC, QD, RCS, RSIT, RKill, Rs, SC, SR, SAP, SVRT, SAS, SL, TMHC, TSA ART, UHM, Vba32 AR, VRS, WR (AiO), Xvirus PG, ZAM, ZHPC, ZHPD and Zoek. I have 23 Years of PC Experience. Bold = effective.


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#2 britechguy

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 09:18 AM

I don't.  If the update is critical in any way it is specifically marked as such and Windows Update will pick it up on the next check, and those are done once per day at a minimum.

 

If you check the purpose of the update to which you make reference it will most likely be something like, "Update Lithuanian currency for Office 2013," or the like.  These sorts of updates roll out over the course of days similarly to the way feature updates to Windows 10 itself roll out, but over the course of months.


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#3 softeyes

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 02:40 PM

HI! Personally I tend to roll with whatever Microsoft pushes through via automatic updates. On occasion I sure have taken a peep to see if there's anything hanging out, why not? I do not believe that manually checking would harm the operating system, internal or external hardware.

 

You have a great question, to the best of my knowledge I have never come upon anything written by Microsoft that indicates restrictions as to how frequent a computer user can/should check for Windows 10 updates. 

 

For fun, this is from Microsoft:

 

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4027667/windows-update-windows-10

 

 

Windows 10 periodically checks for updates so you don’t have to. When an update is available, it’s automatically downloaded and installed, keeping your device up to date with the latest features.

 

To check for updates now, select the Start  button, and then go to Settings  > Update & security  > Windows Update, and select Check for updates. If Windows Update says your device is up to date, you have all the updates that are currently available.

 

My vote: have a look  :)

 

Self edit to add /should


Edited by softeyes, 09 August 2017 - 02:41 PM.


#4 midimusicman79

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 06:33 AM

Hi, britechguy & softeyes!
 
Thank you both for the prompt and insightful replies! :) And thanks for the link! :)
 

I don't.  If the update is critical in any way it is specifically marked as such and Windows Update will pick it up on the next check, and those are done once per day at a minimum.
 
If you check the purpose of the update to which you make reference it will most likely be something like, "Update Lithuanian currency for Office 2013," or the like.  These sorts of updates roll out over the course of days similarly to the way feature updates to Windows 10 itself roll out, but over the course of months.

 
As it happens, the said update was KB4032188 and was important enough to increase the build number, however for some reason it did not automatically download as I had to manually trigger it by clicking the Check for updates button.
 
Which makes it semi-automatic at best, so I am wondering if one or more of the Windows Update Services are wrongfully set to manual when they actually should be set to automatic.
 
I have now checked said settings, and it turns out that Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS) is set to manual. Windows Update (WUAUSERV) is set to automatic (delayed start).
 
Should I change BITS to automatic or automatic (delayed start)?
 
Thank you!
 
Regards,
midimusicman79

Edited by midimusicman79, 10 August 2017 - 08:19 AM.

MS Win 10 Pro 64-bit, EAM Pro/EEK, MB 3 Free, WPP, SWB Free, CryptoPrevent Free and Unchecky, WFW, FFQ with uBO, Ghostery, Grammarly Free and HTTPS Ew. Acronis TI 2018, K. Sw. Upd. AM-tools: 9-lab RT BETA, AdwCleaner, Auslogics AM, aswMBR, Avira PCC, BD ART, catchme, Cezurity AV, CCE, CKS, ClamWin P., Crystal Sec., DDS, DWCI, EMCO MD, eScan MWAV, ESS/EOS, FGP, FMTB, FRST, F-SOS, FSS, FreeFixer, GMP, GMER, hP BETA, HJT, Inherit, JRT, K. avz4, KVRT, K. TDSSKiller, LSP-Fix, MB 3 Free, MBAR BETA, MA Stinger, NMC, NoBot, NPE, NSS, NVT MRF (NMRF), OTL, PCC, QD, RCS, RSIT, RKill, Rs, SC, SR, SAP, SVRT, SAS, SL, TMHC, TSA ART, UHM, Vba32 AR, VRS, WR (AiO), Xvirus PG, ZAM, ZHPC, ZHPD and Zoek. I have 23 Years of PC Experience. Bold = effective.


#5 britechguy

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 08:22 AM

Any of the updates that are not critical, and particularly the "big updates" be they the feature updates that change the Version number or the "smaller bigger" ones that change build number, are consistently rolled-out in cohorts over the course of weeks to months.

 

The days of "patch Tuesday" as we knew it are long gone.   All necessary updates to Windows 10 will eventually be applied to a Windows 10 system.  There are millions of Windows 10 systems still running Version 1607 not because Windows Update is broken but because those machines have not yet been included in one of the Version 1703 update cohorts.

 

It was months after my two laptops when from Version 1607 to 1703 until my desktop got it, and the laptops were weeks apart.  The laptop I'm typing from went to Build 15053.540 on August 8th as did the other one in my household.  I do not believe my desktop has, yet, but I haven't checked this morning.

 

The only updates that can reliably be expected to be pushed out and applied to virtually all machines at very close to the same time are critical security patches.  All the rest will "get there when they get there" unless the user chooses to manually push them, which they can do.  I generally wait until Microsoft is good and ready to deliver the non-critical updates to my machine.

 

I'm not saying you can't manually check for updates and apply them as you have.  But your original question is worded with the inclusion of "how often should," and the only answer to that is "whatever floats your boat and makes you feel better," since updates will eventually make it to your machine unless Windows Update is broken.  If it's been chugging along up to now it most likely isn't.

 

I apply the same rule to computer system maintenance that I do to automotive maintenance:  Don't *^*# with a functioning system.


Edited by britechguy, 10 August 2017 - 08:24 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
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#6 midimusicman79

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 09:19 AM

Hi again, britechguy!

 

Well, as I once in the past tried to change BITS to automatic or automatic (delayed start), it actually reverted back to manual by itself.

 

And as such, I will heed your advice and leave the setting as it is. :thumbup2:

 

On a side note, as I found the said KB-article, I discovered that there has been approximately 12 build updates over the last 4 months, so that means 3 weeks in between.

 

Thank you very much for the help! :) The issue has been successfully resolved! :thumbup2:

 

Regards,

midimusicman79


MS Win 10 Pro 64-bit, EAM Pro/EEK, MB 3 Free, WPP, SWB Free, CryptoPrevent Free and Unchecky, WFW, FFQ with uBO, Ghostery, Grammarly Free and HTTPS Ew. Acronis TI 2018, K. Sw. Upd. AM-tools: 9-lab RT BETA, AdwCleaner, Auslogics AM, aswMBR, Avira PCC, BD ART, catchme, Cezurity AV, CCE, CKS, ClamWin P., Crystal Sec., DDS, DWCI, EMCO MD, eScan MWAV, ESS/EOS, FGP, FMTB, FRST, F-SOS, FSS, FreeFixer, GMP, GMER, hP BETA, HJT, Inherit, JRT, K. avz4, KVRT, K. TDSSKiller, LSP-Fix, MB 3 Free, MBAR BETA, MA Stinger, NMC, NoBot, NPE, NSS, NVT MRF (NMRF), OTL, PCC, QD, RCS, RSIT, RKill, Rs, SC, SR, SAP, SVRT, SAS, SL, TMHC, TSA ART, UHM, Vba32 AR, VRS, WR (AiO), Xvirus PG, ZAM, ZHPC, ZHPD and Zoek. I have 23 Years of PC Experience. Bold = effective.


#7 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 09:22 AM

Hi all!

 

We are all familiar with "Patch Tuesday", which specifically is the second Tuesday in every month, when Microsoft releases updates to Windows 10 on a regular basis.

 

However, Microsoft also releases out-of-band updates to Windows 10, always in between the above-mentioned updates on a non-regular basis, without a specific date.

 

I know that Windows Update automatically checks for new updates regularly, but I just experienced an out-of-band update that was released six days ago, which I had not yet installed.

 

And hence, my question is as follows;

 

How often should one manually check for out-of-band Windows 10 updates?

 

Thank you very much in advance!

 

Regards,

midimusicman79

 

 

I would say "never."


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#8 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 09:23 AM

Any of the updates that are not critical, and particularly the "big updates" be they the feature updates that change the Version number or the "smaller bigger" ones that change build number, are consistently rolled-out in cohorts over the course of weeks to months.

 

The days of "patch Tuesday" as we knew it are long gone.   All necessary updates to Windows 10 will eventually be applied to a Windows 10 system.  There are millions of Windows 10 systems still running Version 1607 not because Windows Update is broken but because those machines have not yet been included in one of the Version 1703 update cohorts.

 

It was months after my two laptops when from Version 1607 to 1703 until my desktop got it, and the laptops were weeks apart.  The laptop I'm typing from went to Build 15053.540 on August 8th as did the other one in my household.  I do not believe my desktop has, yet, but I haven't checked this morning.

 

The only updates that can reliably be expected to be pushed out and applied to virtually all machines at very close to the same time are critical security patches.  All the rest will "get there when they get there" unless the user chooses to manually push them, which they can do.  I generally wait until Microsoft is good and ready to deliver the non-critical updates to my machine.

 

I'm not saying you can't manually check for updates and apply them as you have.  But your original question is worded with the inclusion of "how often should," and the only answer to that is "whatever floats your boat and makes you feel better," since updates will eventually make it to your machine unless Windows Update is broken.  If it's been chugging along up to now it most likely isn't.

 

I apply the same rule to computer system maintenance that I do to automotive maintenance:  Don't *^*# with a functioning system.

 

 

This is very good advice!!!!


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#9 britechguy

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 09:33 AM

 

I would say "never."

 

 

 

Which distills my position to its very essence.   However, people seem reluctant to accept "the essence statement" without the reasons and reasoning behind it!


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
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