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Firewall for non-profit


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9 replies to this topic

#1 sjpritch25

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 10:34 AM

I'm going to be the IT person for a small non-profit.   They have 5 employees and a small computer lab.  I plan on getting a unifi ap ac lr wireless ap.   I just don't know what firewall to purchase.  I just need something basic and inexpensive.


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 11:20 AM

I don't see any particular firewall requirements specced out, https://help.ubnt.com/hc/en-us/articles/115002262328-UniFi-Feature-Guide-Wireless-Uplink#relatedarticles .

 

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#3 sjpritch25

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 02:23 PM

Sorry, I guess my question wasn't clear.  I was just inquiring about a good entry level hardware firewall for the non-profit.  


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#4 hamluis

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 03:23 PM

My opinion...unless there's some special desire for monitoring and fluff...the Windows firewall is adequate and inherent in Windows.

 

Years ago, I used/tried various firewalls by Comodo, Avast, and others...I found that no particular firewall is more effective than the other...the only variability I found was the amount of administrative pastry each exposed me to.  I'm lazy and I don't find a lot of unnecessary details or stats...don't make me feel any more secure than I experience with the Windows firewall.

 

Others here may have different opinions.

 

Louis



#5 dropbear

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 05:46 PM

just confirming, you are after a firewall at the hardware level, in other words in the modem or router?

and not a firewall in the PC which is a software firewall.

 

if you really do mean a hardware firewall, you have no control over what 'type' is used.

well, apart from the brand of modem/router.

the firewall is part of the firmware, and can be slightly tweaked via the hardware's configuration menu.


Instead of reading this, why not do a backup of your PC.

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#6 sjpritch25

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 08:19 AM

yes hardware level.   


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#7 britechguy

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 09:20 AM

Looking at the manufacturer webpage for the noted device, https://www.ubnt.com/unifi/unifi-ap/, from all appearances this thing is a "glorified repeater."   It is truly a wireless access point, but has no direct connection to the internet except via either a wireless, switched, or direct wired connection to the modem/modem router that it acts as a range extender for.

 

Firewall functionality at the hardware level is present in any modem-router I've ever dealt with.  To what is this thing going to be connected and is firewall functionality a part of it already?


Edited by britechguy, 10 August 2017 - 09:21 AM.

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#8 daveydoom

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 09:00 PM

Are you interested in using a computer to create a network appliance?   If so, SmoothWall Express is a great option (I used a SmoothWall appliance on my home network from 2003 until 2015).   pfSense is another alternative.   I would assume cost will be a factor.

 

Not sure if you were looking for an option such as one of these or if you were just looking for a standard router from SonicWall, Cisco, Netgear, etc.   

 

Just tossing out some options :)  .


Edited by daveydoom, 16 August 2017 - 09:03 PM.

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#9 YojimboSan

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 12:22 PM

I would go with the ASA 5506 w/ FirePower and a SmartNet contract.

 

https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/security/asa-5506-x-firepower-services/model.html

 

If you wait until the end of the month you can usually get one for ~600 US Dollars. After setting it up, it's basically on autopilot, pays for itself.

 

Any questions about these just let me know!



#10 jessica2291

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 03:29 AM

There are two types of firewalls available, hardware and software firewalls, 

 

Software firewalls: are programs that run on your computer. They operate as close to the network interface as possible, and monitor all your network traffic.
For individual home users, the most popular firewall choice is a software firewall. Software firewalls are installed on your computer (like any software) and you can customize it; allowing you some control over its function and protection features. 
 
Hardware firewalls: A router sitting between your computer and the internet is one of the best and most cost-effective firewalls that the average computer user can have. It’s usually a piece of equipment that sits physically between your computer and where the wires plug into the wall, with flashing lights that tell you it’s on duty.
Hardware firewalls can be purchased as a stand-alone product but more recently hardware firewalls are typically found in broadband routers, and should be considered an important part of your system and network set-up, especially for anyone on a broadband connection.
 
I suggest Zone Alarm Free Firewall, this is one of the good firewalls for all users. 





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