Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Determine True SATA Speeds Linux Style


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 pcpunk

pcpunk

  • Members
  • 5,876 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 31 July 2017 - 04:55 PM

Hey guys, trying to determine SATA Speeds without Windows installed, the HDD went bad and is not in the Laptop ATM.  Using LinuxLiveUSB Session, Mate 17.1-64bit and this Tutorial.
https://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/linux-command-to-find-sata-harddisk-link-speed/
 
The Tutorial is quite good but I don't know how to read or verify the output?  I've tried this on some Windows laptops with various software but not always sure if it is reporting correctly.  I may be able to get the HDD to work if this is better done in Windows, but it seems to me that this is a very good way to do this, especially when there is no HDD to muck up the output.  These are the things I tried, and got some good outputs, but want to be sure of them before I proceed in my understanding of all this.  
 
My goal is to find out if it is worth installing an SSD or a HDD in a computer, as some folks want the storage space and some want speed.  But if the laptop doesn't support SATA-III then may go with an HDD for storage capacity.  Some of these laptops are mine and some will be customers.  This one I am considering keeping if it is SATA-III, but who knows if I will sell or donate it when it is done.
 
First commands from the above site:

mint@mint ~ $ dmesg | grep -i sata | grep 'link up' 
[    8.988211] ata2: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300) 

Second

mint@mint ~ $ dmesg | grep -i --color ahci 
[    8.436092] ahci 0000:00:11.0: version 3.0 
[    8.476584] ahci 0000:00:11.0: irq 41 for MSI/MSI-X 
[    8.476652] ahci 0000:00:11.0: AHCI 0001.0300 32 slots 1 ports 6 Gbps 0x2 impl SATA mode 
[    8.476658] ahci 0000:00:11.0: flags: 64bit ncq sntf ilck pm led clo pmp pio slum part ccc  
[    8.493374] scsi0 : ahci 
[    8.496543] scsi1 : ahci 

Third

mint@mint ~ $ dmesg | grep -i ahci | grep -i --color Gbps 
[    8.476652] ahci 0000:00:11.0: AHCI 0001.0300 32 slots 1 ports 6 Gbps 0x2 impl SATA mode 

It seems as though this laptop is SATA-III Capable but from my research on other laptops and chipsets etc, it seems hard to tell sometimes.

 

I wanted to try these commands but don't know what the "DEVICE-NAME-HERE" is?  I'm guessing they are talking about the System Drive, but there is no system drive, but the USB I'm running off of?  The HDD is not present atm.

smartctl -a /dev/DEVICE-NAME-HERE
smartctl -a /dev/sda | grep "^SATA"
smartctl -a /dev/sda

Computer in question

https://support.hp.com/us-en/product/hp-pavilion-g7-1300-notebook-pc-series/5186814/model/5218735/manuals

 

Thanks, pcupnk


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer


  • Members
  • 6,233 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:11:50 AM

Posted 31 July 2017 - 07:35 PM

None of that generation of laptops support SATA3, even if the chipsets are capable, mobos are not.



#3 pcpunk

pcpunk
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5,876 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 31 July 2017 - 08:33 PM

Then what do these lines suggest?

8.476652] ahci 0000:00:11.0: AHCI 0001.0300 32 slots 1 ports 6 Gbps 0x2 impl SATA mode

AND 

8.476652] ahci 0000:00:11.0: AHCI 0001.0300 32 slots 1 ports 6 Gbps 0x2 impl SATA mode 

I was able to get the HDD to work with Windows 7, and hwinfo says 6Gbps.  Do you guys value the HWINFO software?  There is other software I've tried but seems to do the same as hwinfo, but hwinfo is portable also, so I use that one.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#4 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer


  • Members
  • 6,233 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:11:50 AM

Posted 31 July 2017 - 08:58 PM

Maybe hwinfo just queries the chip, rather than the system board capability?

 

Shame you just install a mini distro on your ever present spare hdd and query using dd? That will give you the truth of the matter.

 

edit: I was just quoting what a HP rep said in my first post, this is the internet though... people are known to be wrong, or just full of misinformation.


Edited by TsVk!, 31 July 2017 - 09:00 PM.


#5 pcpunk

pcpunk
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5,876 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 01 August 2017 - 08:17 AM

1. Yes, this is what I'm afraid of TsVk, the Chip being the factor rather than the real connection.

 

2. dd, yes...that's a good idea, but too much labor because I will be doing this more in the future.

 

3. I understand, this is the same thing I've run into.  I do believe that this one is SATA-III, but will need to go further to know for sure.  Maybe one of the Upgrade guru's will chime in and resolve this for us.

 

I will figure it out eventually but was looking for a quicker guaranteed answer.  I imagine one could look at MB Specs and see which Port is SATA-III then use hwinfo or something to see if that port/connection is being used?  But with laptops it seems the info is a little more scarce than with a Desktop.  

 

I saved the hwinfo text and now can't find it, or else I would have posted it.  Will do later so all can compare if they are interested.

 

Thanks for the input!


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#6 mremski

mremski

  • Members
  • 495 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NH
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 01 August 2017 - 08:40 AM

Speeds are governed by 3 things (lead foot not counted):

Speed of the chipset

Speed of the attached device

"Wiring"

The chipset appears to be capable of up to 6Gbs

If you plug a SATAIII capable device in, the link will be negotiated to the highest speed.

Use a good quality cable if it's a cable interface (laptop, it's likely the drive simply plugs in and the

wiring is actually traces on the motherboard).

 

Can't seem to find the specs for that model from your list, but other places seem to call it "Serial ATA-300" which is SATA-2, 3Gbs. 

I'd look for a  SATA3.0 (6Gbs) at least, plug it in and see what it negotiates to. 


FreeBSD since 3.3, only time I touch Windows is to fix my wife's computer


#7 pcpunk

pcpunk
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5,876 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 02 August 2017 - 09:15 PM

I lost the output of HWINFO or else I would have posted it.  I think I saved it to the HDD by accident...Doh...and took it out because it is bad and needed to wipe if of all info.  I'm confident it will support SATA-III although it is hard to tell.  Why would they make it so hard to tell?  I also am ready to install an SSD to another 3000 Series A8 and will see what that does and what hwinfo says before and after.  I'll follow up when I get the time, and hope my assesment/guess is correct.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#8 Mike_Walsh

Mike_Walsh

    Bleepin' 'Puppy' nut..!!


  • Members
  • 1,348 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:King's Lynn, UK
  • Local time:02:50 AM

Posted 03 August 2017 - 10:24 PM

Hiya, punk.

 

Don't forget, there's at least 3 SATA standards. The original SATA-1 (up to 1.5 GBps); SATA-2 (up to 3 GBps); and the current SATA-3 (up to 6 GBps, as malwaredpc points out.)

 

SATA-drives are backwards compatible. A SATA-3 drive will happily run in a SATA-1 port, but you don't get the speed, obviously.

 

You can even get SSDs for the old IDE/PATA standard. OK, you're not getting the speeds which any of the SATA standards are capable of, but it's a hell of an improvement over an IDE/PATA HDD. The SSD in ye olde Dell lappie is transferring, on average, at 1100 MBps. That's almost 70% of SATA-1 speeds.....

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 


#9 pcpunk

pcpunk
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5,876 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 04 August 2017 - 10:53 AM

Yes, I understand all that Mike, thanks!  Just trying to learn, and splitting hairs a little in my decision of installing a HDD or SSD.  Knowing, or believing at this point that this pc is capable of running SATA-III Speeds I'm likely to go with the ssd.  I know that it will run faster this way, but this computer may also be sold, and some folks like that storage space.  I may keep this one for a Linux Install, though it is a AMD and will likely only run Mint 17.2 is a bit of a drag, as I like 17.3 very much.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#10 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,015 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 09 August 2017 - 05:39 AM

A SSD on a SATA-2 computer dramatically increases performance & response, have SATA-3 SSD's installed in two SATA-2 notebooks, plus one PC. :)

 

With RAPID mode enabled, even more performance & better yet, less writes to the drive, as the technology uses up to 25% of one's installed RAM for everyday processes, such as Web browsing. Remember, regardless of type of RAM, it's still faster than the SSD itself, and why when performing a speed test with Crystal Disk Benchmark, unreal speeds are revealed. While I once thought this to be a gimmick, now know a little more about what RAPID does, and believe that any computer with a SATA interface (regardless of version) benefits. :thumbsup:

 

At today's pricing (less than $100 on promo) for many 250-256 GiB SSD's, where one gets the most speed & more allowed TBW. 120-128 GiB SSD's are kind of phasing out among OEM's, notably are slower (regardless of which SATA version installed in) & 250-256 GiB tends to be the 'sweet spot' for many consumers. Am considering grabbing another 256 GiB Samsung 850 Pro for myself, these has a 10 year warranty (versus $10-15 less for the 850 EVO with only 5 years), makes it a no brainer to step up at that price for the warranty alone. Plus the Pro version uses MLC NAND chips, while the EVO has TLC, the lowest cost, and therefore along with half the warranty, also half of the TBW before it goes into read only. However, only a small percentage of users will never come close to hitting that mark, especially if RAPID is enabled, although note that the driver can act buggy on some computers & has to be uninstalled, 

 

My 2011 model MSI FX603 has dual SSD's, removed the optical drive, and used a bay adapter to install the 2nd (although originally housed the OEM supplied HDD as a Data drive) & I have no regrets, reads & writes are around 265MB/sec (w/out RAPID). :)

 

pcpunk, here's the specs of your notebook, which is well equipped, although likely SATA-2, many 2011 model computers stuck with the standard. 

 

https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c03144642

 

You'll find that a SSD gives fantastic performance, even on SATA-2. Don't take my word for this, run Crystal Disk Benchmark before & after upgrade, and if a Samsung 850 EVO or PRO with RAPID enabled, run once again & compare for yourself. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,015 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 14 September 2017 - 05:33 AM

Hiya, punk.

 

Don't forget, there's at least 3 SATA standards. The original SATA-1 (up to 1.5 GBps); SATA-2 (up to 3 GBps); and the current SATA-3 (up to 6 GBps, as malwaredpc points out.)

 

SATA-drives are backwards compatible. A SATA-3 drive will happily run in a SATA-1 port, but you don't get the speed, obviously.

 

You can even get SSDs for the old IDE/PATA standard. OK, you're not getting the speeds which any of the SATA standards are capable of, but it's a hell of an improvement over an IDE/PATA HDD. The SSD in ye olde Dell lappie is transferring, on average, at 1100 MBps. That's almost 70% of SATA-1 speeds.....

 

 

Mike.  :wink:

 

+1! :)

 

I recently installed a 256GB Samsung 850 Pro in a lady's notebook that was SATA-1 that she cherishes as you do your HP, the benchmarks before & after upgrade were like the difference between day & night. :)

 

The old & dying drive installed would top at 40MB/sec, while the replacement SSD comes close to saturating SATA-1 speeds at just over 140MB/sec, a 3.5x speed boost. At today's pricing for SSD's, there's no reason to purchase a HDD as a boot drive, am getting ready to pull the trigger on a 240GB Crucial for $89.99 that has MLC technology with SLC acceleration. Most SSD's at this price has lower cost TLC chips, which I will no longer purchase. 

 

So even if your computer has SATA-2 ports, you'll still see a dramatic boost in speed (around 250-260MB/sec) versus around 100MB/sec, if that, of a HDD. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 pcpunk

pcpunk
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5,876 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 14 September 2017 - 10:56 PM

This is from HWINFO:

Interface Speed Supported:              Gen3 6.0 Gbps

Current Interface Speed:                Gen2 3.0 Gbps

 

At this point, I know that it is capable of SATAIII, but the HDD is only capable of SATAII, so we'll see in the near future what is what.  Can't get SATAIII with SATAII HDD LOL.  

 

It's okay, as cat says it will really makes things faster anyhow, just trying to learn how to squeeze performance and know which pc to spend the money on first.

 

Thanks cat, definitely need to get one of those Samsung Pro's for my Dell Tower I think.  I have two SSD's now, but really need at least one more lol.  Don't know for which computer yet, and need to take a look at how I will approach my next install.

 

Learning learning learning


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#13 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,015 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 15 September 2017 - 04:25 AM

pcpunk, great to hear, it's good to keep an extra SSD onhand! :)

 

While I've yet to decide with certainty which computer the one am soon going to order will be installed in, will surely go in one (maybe the 'sleeper' Dimension 2400) & will keep the removed one as a spare. Already have a spare M.2 (NVMe) SSD, if by chance you have a PC with an extra GPU slot (PCIe x4), you'll have some fantastic speed for no more cost than a 2.5" SATA model. Although in my main system, have a 512GB Samsung 950 PRO installed (what a bummer, the 960 shipped less than a month later :P), on my second best, have a 240GB MyDigitalSSD NVMe SSD & considering it was nearly two-thirds less in cost than the Samsung, performs great. Didn't install on the hot MB in the M.2 slot, purchased a Sintech PCIe x4 adapter with fan to keep it cool. :)

 

https://www.amazon.com/MyDigitalSSD-80mm-Express-PCIe-240GB/dp/B01M4OO1FT

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01NAQPE6J/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

While the adapter says it's for Samsung NVMe SSD's, others of the same type & sizes will fit. In fact, was so impressed with the purchase, grabbed an extra of each, both are in my safe, awaiting what will be a new & my last Z97 build, as soon as I can get this MB repaired (CPU socket needs replacing, too many bent pins). Am grabbing some components on promo so that when build time is ready, will have most of what I need. 

 

Back to that MyDigitalSSD (NVMe), it runs almost as fast as my Samsung, and sometimes surpasses read speeds, although falls short on writes. Still, for $114.99, having a SSD running at 2500MB/sec read & 1,300MB/sec writes isn't bad at all. If one only has a single GPU slot & no PCIe x4, and satisfied with onboard graphics, can be used in the GPU PCIe slot. It's just that if it's PCIe 2.0, rather than 3.0, speeds will be a little slower, yet still plenty faster than a 2.5" SSD. 

 

KInd of like HDD's today, 2.5" SSD's are beginning to become secondary storage as NVMe is taking over. One thing to beware of, there's SATA-3 M.2 SSD's that's the same size, if it doesn't say 'NVMe', then it's not worth the hassle of installing, will run a lot hotter than the 2.5" type & bottleneck more. I've never purchased a M.2 SATA-3 SSD & never will, not when NVMe costs the same & has much more speed. 

 

Just something I wanted you to be aware of, when considering a future purchase. :)

 

As far as determining the true speed of your SATA port, if you have any SATA-3 SSD onhand, install it & boot into a Live Linux distro, there's a tool to check drive performance, if SATA-2 will be between 200-250MB/sec, if SATA-3, 300-550MB/sec, depending on model & size. Smaller (120-128GB) sizes tends to perform not quite as well, why I have most of these in my SATA-2 notebooks. Anywhere between 240-512GB is the 'sweet spot' for best performance & allows plenty of room for a dual boot, and if a Linux install is added, a tri-boot system. Have W7,10 & Linux Mint root & Swap on at least one PC. I conserve SSD space by directing downloads, documents, pictures, videos, OneDrive, Google Drive & Linux Mint /home (if installed) on a fast HDD that's set to never park, perhaps the leading cause of wear & tear of HDD's. Many are set by default to park in as little as 5 seconds of inactivity. While this practice may be good for battery life, the HDD is being slowly, yet surely killed by this action. Some models will trigger a SMART warning when a predetermined number of start/stop cycles are met, why it's good to get this under control by a ACHI power tweak, set to Active, then '0' at the option below, the same as 'Never', the drive will last much longer. Works on W7 through 10. 

 

https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/72971-add-ahci-link-power-management-power-options-windows-10-a.html

 

SSD users benefits also, but only if the goal is to conserve power. Unfortunately, can't have it both ways, unless one has a WD drive & the WDIDLE3 utility is used to prevent parking for good, regardless of installed OS or power plan. Am not aware of a similar tool for other brands. 

 

Those who are concerned about battery life should carry a portable power bank ($25-35 on promo) often used to power or recharge smartphones & tablets, or a spare battery & swap regular to keep both rotated & healthy, if removable from the exterior. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 pcpunk

pcpunk
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5,876 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 15 September 2017 - 08:08 AM

Had to Bookmark that Post cat!  I wonder if my main desktop has one of these (PCIe x4) Slots.  I would love to dual boot my main desktop, but with Two Drives and not all on one. 

 

What would I look for in HWINFO to find out (PCIe x4) Slots cat?  

 

Right now working on getting my main work computers all setup, which includes putting the EVO 850 250GB Into my main laptop.  It already has a dual boot W7 and Mint Mate on it, and was in my old Toshiba.  Still trying to decide whether I will Re-Install and start over or just use it how it is now?  I need to start another thread about this, and may use sysprep to make the switch.  Thinking about dual booting on separate drives on this one also, it's a 17" laptop and has two drive bays? but not sure yet what speed the second drive supports, probably not as fast as the Main Drive bay?  In this case I'll just dual boot on one drive.


sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

KDE, Ruler of all Distro's

eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#15 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,015 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:09:50 PM

Posted 16 September 2017 - 05:57 AM

Had to Bookmark that Post cat!  I wonder if my main desktop has one of these (PCIe x4) Slots.  I would love to dual boot my main desktop, but with Two Drives and not all on one. 

 

What would I look for in HWINFO to find out (PCIe x4) Slots cat?  

 

 

pcpunk, check out the online manual for your computer. It should list (& show) all ports, maybe in PDF format. Note that if you have dual x16 graphics ports, one can be used as PCIe x4, although the GPU (if installed) will take a minor performance hit. If you're not using that slot for a GPU & satisfied with onboard graphics, then you can use it for a PCIe (NVMe based) SSD. Make sure in the specs that it says 'NVMe', otherwise you're getting a SATA-3 M.2 SSD, on most computers, a wasted effort, especially if there's available SATA ports. And also make sure that the PC can boot from a PCIe slot, not all computers can. As stated in regards to a previous computer, check out the OEM Hardware Forum for the model, if necessary register & don't be shy about asking questions. After all, it's free & you don't want to spend cash for components that you can't use for now. I regularly seek assistance on various OEM forums, especially Dell, Lenovo, Toshiba & HP as needed, as well as MB/GPU OEM forums. The assistance received greatly helped to make informed decisions in regards to upgrade paths of various components. 

 

Since my Dell XPS 8700 has only one GPU port with a GTX 1060 SSC (6GB GDDR5) card installed & no PCIe x4 slot, my only option for NVMe will be to replace the MB. The next series up, XPS 8900, includes a M.2 port, although limited to Gen 2 (previous gen) specs/speeds, which was a dumb move on Dell's end to not have the latest spec. PCIe 3.0 Gen 3 has been available since 2014, the XPS 8900 was released nearly three years later. Even some aftermarket MB's M.2 slots are of the last gen, although one can bypass this with the PCIe adapter shown, as long as there's either two GPU (PCIe 3.0 x16) slots, or a dedicated x4 slot, which would disable one of those for the GPU. 

 

Note that AMD AM2/AM2+/AM3/AM3+ are limited to PCIe 2.0, so speeds won't be quite as fast, although still much faster than a 2.5" SSD. :)

 

The one I linked above, along with adaptor, is very fast on my 2nd best PC, 2nd link in my sig below. BTW, speaking about some current MB's not having a Gen 3 M.2 slot, the ASRock Z97 Extreme6 has it. Plus a Gen 2, at that time (early 2014), there were no M.2 SATA-3 SSD's, NVMe only. so why MB OEM's, as well as PC ones are still pushing Gen 2 M.2 in 2017 totally baffles me, other than for the earlier AMD platforms listed above. Had I known that their Z97 Extreme9 existed, would had purchased that instead, has a proprietary controller that provides more lanes than the CPU offers, this is why when normally installing a PCIe NVMe SSD in a 2nd GPU slot, the GPU is downgraded to x8, rather than x16. Seems like it should be x12, because the PCIe NVMe SSD won't use any more than x4, yet that's not the way it works. 

 

This is a lot to learn & believe me, I didn't overnight myself, it was after my first NVMe SSD that I began to. More learnings from the University of Hard Knocks. :)

 

One last point & will end this post, NVMe was supported on Linux long before Windows, beginning with Ubuntu 12.04/Linux Mint 13 LTS on consumer distros, was further back in time for corporate/business use. Some of the original PCIe NVMe SSD's, which were the size of a small GPU, were selling on eBay for up to $2,000 for 5 year old models. It would be at least 5 years after initial release before these would become available to the general public, and nowhere as many choices of today. Nowadays, NVMe is storming the World, and 2.5" SSD's are being used as general storage, to save both power & space. Many aftermarket PC cases has one or a pair of holders for 2.5" drives behind the MB, removal of that door gives access. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users