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Computer overheating, trying to diagnose


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#1 Shaldreth

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 04:43 PM

Hey all. So I basically have this computer: https://support.hp.com/za-en/document/c03298983

It's a HP Pavilion HPE h9. I got it all the way back in 2012-ish, and it's definitely starting to show its age. For some reason the message "S12-Rear Chassis fan not detected" keeps popping up at startup, even though the rear chassis fan seems to work perfectly fine. Unplugging and re-plugging it into the motherboard doesn't fix the error message.  

Recently the computer has been getting overly hot and the fan has been REALLY cranking up whenever I play games (something it didn't used to do), and I'm trying to figure out what the problem is. It's even shut off a couple times without warning, I assume due to heat. Is there a way to tell whether it's a problem with the cooling system or the fan without actually going in and replacing things one-by-one? Any known issues with this model?



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#2 ranchhand_

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 05:37 PM

Well, the usual thing is to do a thorough cleaning with compressed air, especially the CPU heatsink and fan, especially if you haven't done it before. A good way to check is to take the side cover off and run the unit with a window fan blowing in. If your overheating problems are less or disappear, dust is probably the culprit. You can try replacing the rear case fan, they don't cost much. Possibly it has not failed, but may be running at less RPMs if the main bearing is wearing out. If all else fails, you may consider re-setting the CPU with fresh thermal grease. Sometimes that fixes the problem. I suggest only doing this as a last resort, If you aren't experienced with that procedure do some studying up on it first.

The specs you posted say that unit has a liquid cooling setup; if so, check for leaking and make sure the coolant hasn't leaked out. Make sure the pump is running properly so as to circulate the coolant.


Edited by ranchhand_, 31 July 2017 - 05:41 PM.

Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#3 Shaldreth

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 06:10 PM

Hi, 

I do regularly clean my case with compressed air, so I'm pretty sure that dust isn't the issue! I'll start looking at some new fans if they're not too expensive. 

I definitely haven't seen any leaks anywhere, but if it there a previous leak and the coolant has now dried/evaporated, is there any way to tell? And same question with the pump; how can I tell if it's running properly or not? 



#4 The-Toolman

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 06:32 PM

I would also make certain that the graphics card fan and the power supply fan are all working.

 

I would also do a bios reset probably won't make any difference but I would do it anyway.

 

I would also see if any fans are detected in the bios and if the bios has any fan speed detection setting make certain those are set to default at least.


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Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)


#5 ranchhand_

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 07:18 AM

Sorry for the late reply....life interfered.

If the leak is very tiny, the fluid can evaporate over a period of time so that gradually the amount circulating lowers. This is very rare, but it can happen with older units. There should be stains around the joints. If there are no stains or discolorations probably there are no leaks. Hard to evaluate the pump; try lightly touching the pump and see if you detect slight vibration from it indicating the impeller is running. You can try an old car mechanic's trick: take a long metal rod, place one end on the pump and the other end on your ear. If it is running you should detect some kind of faint sound from it. As a side thought, this is also a good way to check if you start having a noise coming out of the computer that you cannot find. Sometimes fan bearings start making noise when wearing out and you can find the part using this method.

Did you try my suggestion about running the computer with the side off and a fan blowing in?  Definitely try this before you start replacing things. Toolman's suggestion above about checking the RPMs of your fans is a good one. You can also try CPUID, it's free download. It will also post your GPU temp.


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#6 Shaldreth

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 08:38 PM

Welp, I tried to reset the BIOS as Toolman suggested, through the Startup Menu by following a guide online, since I figured there was no harm in trying. And my computer now refuses to boot Windows, instead crashing halfway through the logo animation and sending me to the system recovery screen. Can't use any of the system restore or startup repair options either; with startup repair it says StartupRepairOffline. With System restore it says "You must specify which Windows installation to restore. Restart, select an operating system, and then select system restore." System image recovery says the files were not found. Memory diagnostic says "Windows cannot check for memory problems. An error is preventing Windows from checking for memory problems."

Ranchhand, I didn't get a chance to try your suggestion about using a fan on the computer yet sadly; I can't find my box fan. As soon as I can get my computer back from being a brick, I'll get back to looking for it! I did download CPU ID like you suggested and it seems as though all my fans are working properly; or at least registering properly, so I'm really not sure what the "rear chassis fan not detected" error is all about. I can post more details once I get the whole 'dead computer' issue fixed. Any suggestions?

Edited by Shaldreth, 02 August 2017 - 09:45 PM.


#7 The-Toolman

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 10:22 PM

Exactly how did you try to enter your bios screen.

 

Usually to enter bios you restart your computer while pressing one of the keys F1 or F2 or the Delete key depending on your computer.

 

 

 

 

 

Unplug the power cord and remove your side cover and pull your bios battery and wait 10 minutes and reinstall the battery and that should take you back to defaults.

 

Plug the power cord back in and power up and see what happens.


Edited by The-Toolman, 02 August 2017 - 10:29 PM.

I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

The world is what you make of it, if it doesn't fit, you make alterations.

 

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)


#8 ilonggo

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 10:48 PM

Hello  shaldreth,

 

Have you tried to check your CPU temperature in your BIOS as well as the fan RPM? With regard to your PC not booting, if you have a Windows DVD or recovery tools. Try to repair Windows using either of the two. I hope that helps.



#9 ranchhand_

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 08:15 AM

Let's try this to reset the BIOS:

Power down and unplug the power cable from the wall socket. Press the front panel power switch for 5 seconds (clears the capacitors). Open the case and remove the CMOS battery for about 10 minutes. It looks like a small, silver coin about the size of a nickel. Many computers also have a small jumper switch usually located close to the battery. Move the jumper to the side, wait about 10 seconds, then move it back to original position again. You can check your computer manual to find where this jumper is located. Then reinstall the CMOS battery again; make sure you get the polarity correct, if you put it in backwards the computer will do some really strange things, and possibly not boot.

Try to boot the computer.


Edited by ranchhand_, 03 August 2017 - 08:15 AM.

Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#10 Shaldreth

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 07:49 PM

Sorry, couldn’t reply earlier due to work.

 

Toolman - I did exactly that. I couldn’t find a guide for my specific computer, so I just followed advice from a couple online like I said. I pressed ESC right as my computer was booting up to get to the Startup Menu, then went to Computer Setup (F10) to access the BIOS menu, then hit “Apply Defaults and Exit”. The computer restarted and then began to crash every time it tries to boot Windows. I can still access the Startup Menu at launch and the System Restore menu, but nothing else.

Anyway, I tried removing and replacing the BIOS battery after ten minutes as you suggested; no luck. My computer showed me a screen that said “BIOS default loaded”, and tried to boot, but it still won’t go past the Windows Logo screen before crashing and putting me at the System Restore screen.

 

ilonggo - I did not see a CPU temperature monitoring section in my BIOS, just the fan speeds. However, I already had CoreTemp installed on my PC which I was using to monitor my temperatures while playing my game; it’s how I knew the computer was getting overly hot. I now also have CPUID installed by ranchhand’s suggestion. Sadly I don’t have a Windows DVD since this computer came with Windows installed, and the recovery tools that it gives me are giving me the error messages I described in my previous post.

 

ranchhand - As mentioned above, removing the battery for ten minutes (okay, more like 30) did give me a new message upon starting the computer up, but it ultimately didn't work. I was unable to find the jumper switch on the motherboard to change its position; I suspect it’s buried under something at the moment and I’ll have to go in and take apart the computer completely to get at it - something I wasn’t going to do tonight.

 

Any more ideas?



#11 The-Toolman

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 08:54 PM

Man I can't find anything on your computer bios setup online.

Go to this website and create an account and explain your problem and see if they can offer some kind of solution or how you could obtain some documentation on your computer bios setup.

 

https://h30434.www3.hp.com/

 

For whatever reason HP just doesn't put out any user documentation.


I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

The world is what you make of it, if it doesn't fit, you make alterations.

 

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.  (Mark Twain)


#12 cmptrgy

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 09:59 PM

It appears to me these are the user guides for your computer 

https://support.hp.com/us-en/product/hp-pavilion-hpe-h9-1100-phoenix-desktop-pc-series/5154893/model/5233452/manuals

 

Maybe you can find ideas to get your computer back up & running: maybe even restoring it back to factory condition.

I'd like to believe there are recommendations on how to troubleshoot your liquid cooling system.



#13 ranchhand_

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 10:46 PM

Ok, so the BIOS is attempting to access Windows. That is a good sign.

Try to start your computer in Safe Mode. Usually this is done by tapping an F-key on startup; If you have a user's manual it may be in there. If not, try F-8, or F-11. Because HP uses various motherboards with various BIOS chips, it will vary. If all else fails and you cannot find any information, try HP's website. MAYBE they made a mistake and actually put some useful information for your computer on it.

If nothing there, try booting your computer starting with F-1 and work your way through all the F-keys; eventually you will strike gold. You will not harm anything doing this, all that will happen is that you will get various options to boot in to. One of those will be safe mode.

If you can boot into safe mode successfully and the computer runs without crashing, you have corrupted drivers/files and at least we know that the problem is.

 

If everything else doesn't work, go Here and download Hirens Boot CD (free). Burn to a CD or DVD. Reboot your computer with the disk in the DVD drive. The BIOS must be set to CD=1st Boot Device for this to work. Hopefully this will enable you to boot into Windows.

After Hirens loads, at the top of the screen is an option, "Boot From HD". Click on that and hopefully Windows will boot if only the MBR  is corrupted. I am running vs 15.1, I am assuming vs 5.2 will be similar.

Let us know how it goes.


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#14 cmptrgy

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 07:04 AM

Another thing you can do is download the HP Support Assistant if you can boot into Windows using the advice of the other posters.

If you can do that, you can have HP recognize your computer and part of the included information will be the manual for your computer.



#15 Shaldreth

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 06:43 PM

Toolman, I'll create an account there shortly and ask for advice over the weekend. 

Thanks cmptrgy for those links! I'll be reading through them for a little while. 

ranchhand -  it still crashes in safemode, right after loading the "disc" and "CLASSPMP" drivers - so I assume whatever driver comes after that is the problem. I'll burn that Hirens Boot CD but it might take me some time to get it done, since I need to find another computer to do it on over the weekend. Thanks for all your advice. 






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