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PC freezes


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#1 Jach00

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 06:29 AM

Hi, I have strange problem with my PC - over last months it freezes completely every few hours. Screen freezes, computer doesn't react to any input devices (mouse,keyboard) and even power/reset buttons. It plays sound from the last 0,5s before freeze in a loop. The only way to stop it is to power off the power supply.

Problem occurs independently whether I watch videos, play games or browse web.

I use Windows 10, but problem occured when I used Windows 8 also.

I made tests using HDTune and Memtest86 and they didn't find any problem.

My config:

  • Intel Core i5 2500K
  • Asrock P67 PRO3 (B3) Intel P67 LGA1155

  • Goodram DDR3 4GB 1333MHz CL9 x2

  • MSI ATI Radeon HD7870 but i tested with another also

  • Chieftec CFT-500-A12S

This computer worked for about 4 years without any problems. I made "visual check" of power supply - capacitors don't look like broken.

I'm aware that it's probably too few to find the solution to my problem so the first question is - could you recommend me tools to diagnose it better?



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#2 dc3

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 10:04 AM

Have you tried booting into Safe Mode to see if the problem persists?

 

Have you looked in the Device Manager to see if there are any yellow warnings or red errors?

 

If the problem doesn't persist in Safe Mode you can run a Clean Boot to see if there is a third party service causing this and which one it is.  If this is the case let me know and I will provide you with instructions for performing a Clean Boot.


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#3 Jach00

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 08:16 AM

Problem did not persist when computer was booted into Safe Mode, but I wasn't precise enoguh in my post - it is averagely every few hours, but not at regular intervals. I mean - there isn't certainty that safe mode solves problem.

 

I didn't have any warnings or errors in Device Manager.

 

In the coming days I will try with Clean Boot.



#4 dc3

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 08:53 AM

Being an intermittent problem running a Clean Boot will not be of much use unless the problem is there when you run it.  But there is a restart involved in this which could stop the problem again making the Clean Boot useless.


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#5 mightywiz

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 05:06 PM

make sure you all fans are spinning and the heat sink is not plugged up with dirt/animal hair.  being 4 yrs old and if you've never blown fan/heatsinks out, it could be heat related.

 

also being 4 yrs old it just may be time for a new power supply.  download piriform's speccy and monitor voltages.   but speccy isn't always 100% accurate on all machines you may need to

use a volt meter to verify low reading that speccy may give you. 



#6 Jach00

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 05:29 PM

I clean the dust in computer every few months, so I expect it's not this reason. I will check voltages as you advise, but my problem isn't related with the load. It occurs during either low or high load. I would expect, that power supply will have problems with maintaining proper voltages during heavy load. But these are only my considerations, I will check that.

 

Thanks!

 

PS Sorry if something is not as clear in my post as it should be. English is not my first language and I had some problems to express my reflections.



#7 mightywiz

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 05:46 PM

I've had several customer power supply issues where the machine will just shut off for no reason at random time.   I would suspect a faulty power supply considering the age of your computer. then my next step would be to pull and re-seat all cards, ram & CPU (also removing and replace thermal paste on the heatsink).

 

when checking for bad capacitors your also looking for swollen or bulging tops.  and they can be slightly swollen so look carefully at them and make sure your not missing something.



#8 dc3

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 07:56 AM

The capacitors being referred to are electrolytic, these break down over time.  As the capacitors breaks down the PSU's wattage decreases.

 

If you have a multimeter you can check the three main rail voltages.

 

Yellow +12VDC
Red +5VDC
Orange +3.3VDC

 

Readings should not have variances larger than +/- five percent.  

Maximum.........Minimum
12.6V.................11.4V
5.25V.................4.75V
3.47V.................3.14V


Edited by dc3, 08 August 2017 - 07:57 AM.

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#9 HyperHenry

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 09:14 PM

If you could publish the Speccy Report mentioned earlier it would give some information on temps and voltages. I do agree that a main suspect would be the PSU. I blow my CPU and fans out every week. Might be overkill but I guess I'm a little OCD that way lol.

EDIT: To publish the Speccy Report, after you run it click file, then publish snapshot, a popup with a link will appear. click copy to clipboard and then paste it in a post here.


Edited by HyperHenry, 09 August 2017 - 09:16 PM.


#10 dc3

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 09:29 AM

If you could publish the Speccy Report mentioned earlier it would give some information on temps and voltages. I do agree that a main suspect would be the PSU. I blow my CPU and fans out every week. Might be overkill but I guess I'm a little OCD that way lol.

EDIT: To publish the Speccy Report, after you run it click file, then publish snapshot, a popup with a link will appear. click copy to clipboard and then paste it in a post here.

Unfortunately, there was no mention of the use of the Speccy Snapshot.

 

Unfortunately using programs like CPU-Z HWMonitor or Speccy to read the rail voltages usually will not be accurate.  The accuracy of the readings depends on the sensors being used to read these voltages.  These sensors a iffy at best, but using a third party application can report inaccurate readings.  For the most accurate readings from these sensors you should look at these in the BIOS.  The best way to determine if the voltages are within normal parameters would be to use a multimeter to read the rail voltages.  In order to get an accurate reading of these voltages you should put a load on the PSU, copying a movie would be sufficient.  Alternatively you could use a power supply voltage tester which actually reads the voltages apposed to those that only indicate a pass/fail.

 

Having said this, the Speccy can provide other information which could be useful.

 

Please download and install Speccy to provide us with information about your computer.  Clicking on this link will automatically initiate the download.

When Speccy opens Click on File which is in the upper left portion of the screen, then click on Publish Snapshot.

In the following screen click on Copy to Clipboard.

 In your next post right click inside the Reply to Topic box, then click on Paste.  This will load a link to the Speccy log.


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#11 Jach00

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 12:05 PM

Here is my Speccy log: http://speccy.piriform.com/results/Xz8NPLGqu1cjeGyrK37scg8
Unfortunately. some names are not in English. 

I measured voltages with multimeter:
5V rail - 5.17V
12V rail - 12.04V

Didn't have any free 3.3V rail.



#12 HyperHenry

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 08:03 AM

The Speccy report did show a 3.3v rail. I'd boot into your bios and check it there for the most accurate reading. It also shows both of your monitors are State: enabled unsafe. How do you have them hooked up to your computer? I am guessing this is a driver issue. Or maybe screen resolution might need to be adjusted.



#13 dc3

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 09:32 AM

Because the +5V DC and +12V DC rails are well within normal parameters I would suspect that the +3.3V DC rail is good as well.  

 

You had posted that the problem wasn't occurring in Safe Mode,  I suggested that you perform a Clean Boot to see if the problem persists.  I later suggested that this could be a waste of time, I have to correct this statement.  In a Clean Boot all of the third party applications / services are stopped.  By rebooting after disabling these applications the computer should start up and run properly if the problem is one of these applications.  This can tell us very quickly if this is more likely related to one of these applications if the computer turns on, runs without problems for an appreciable amount of time.  If the problem continues the same process should be run with the startup items.  If the problem persists after both of these it will be time to look elsewhere.  Please run the Clean Boot, you will need to follow the instruction in the order they appear for this to work properly.


Edited by dc3, 27 August 2017 - 09:43 AM.

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#14 dc3

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 10:20 AM

Regarding reading the rail voltages, I'm guessing that you read the +12V and +5V rails from a Molex connector.  Because the Molex connectors don't include the +3.3V orange wire you were not able to take a reading from the connector.  But a SATA power connector does include this rail voltage.  With the computer turned off you can take a sewing pin and carefully push it though the insulation and into the conductor.  Connect the red (positive) probe to the pin and turn on the computer.  You will need to make contact with the case for a ground.  You should be able to read the +3.3V rail.  Remove the pin after you have finished reading the voltage.

 

There is another way to read these rail voltages, but this is a little more involved.

 

You will need to turn off the computer and unplug the power cord either from the back of the PSU or from the wall receptacle.

 

Remove the side panel, touch the inside of the case to discharge any static-electricity.

 

You will need to disconnect the 24-pin PSU connector from the motherboard.  There is a tab which needs to be pressed to release the connector so it can be pulled free from the motherboard.

 

When you press the power button to start the computer this shorts the two header pins which the two wires from the power switch connects to.  This in turn sends a signal through the 24-pin connector via the Green wire, this initiates the start of the PSU.  In order to use the Green wire to start the PSU you will need to place a wire jumper between the Green wire socket and any black wire socket.  A paperclip or a piece of insulated wire can be used for this.

 

With the preparations made it is time to plug the PSU power cord back into the wall receptacle.  When this is plugged in the PSU should start, the case fan should be spinning at this time.  This fan will place a small load on the PSU which will ensure a more accurate voltage reading than without a load.

 

After making you readings unplug the PSU power cord, remove the jumper and reattach the 24-pin connector to the motherboard.  Plug the PSU power cord back into the wall receptacle.  You should be able to restart the computer using the power button.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 





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