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Which ram to buy in terms of warranty and reliability?


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#1 tantrik

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 09:23 AM

Processor: Intel Core i3-4130 CPU @ 3.40 GHz
Motherboard: Asus H81M-E
Memory: Transcend 2GB DIMM DDR3 1333 MHz
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 32 bit
 
Dear friends,
 
I am planning to buy a 4GB DDR3 ram (1333 MHz/1600 MHz) for my motherboard. In my place there are two types of ram in terms of warranty. Transcend and Cheval, both of their 4GB DDR3 ram has 1 year warranty but brands like Adata, Apacer, Goldkey, Corsair (both Valueselect and Vengeance), Kingston and Team, each of their 4GB DDR3 ram have lifetime warranty. Also, the ones with lifetime warranty comes with a price of at least 1.5 - 2 times more than the ones with 1 year warranty. 
 
My current Transcend ram is running for 6 years without any hassle but it has lifetime warranty when bought during 2011 but now has only 1 year warranty for the latest ones albeit cheaper. So I know how reliable is Transcend ram but have no idea about the rest. Should I buy ram with 1 year warranty and save money or go for ram with lifetime warranty for future probable failures after 1 year? Is ram with "lifetime warranty" worth it as it is more expensive? How often ram fails (after 1 year) and how long it normally lasts? Which brand of ram to buy if I decide to get one with lifetime warranty and reliability because I do not have any experience with other aforementioned ram brands? 
 
Thanks in advance.


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 10:35 AM

Well, this is no help...but I can only go by my own experiences.

 

For the past 20 years, I have bought RAM produced by many known and unknown manufacturers.  With the exception of one module, all worked properly on the systems I installed said modules...and that one was quickly and efficiently replaced by the seller.

 

I have never paid attention to the warranty periods attached to purchased modules...the only reason I replaced modules was that better/faster modules and prices came into the range that I wanted to use and pay for.

 

I read about RAM failures but I've not experienced one save the defective module I purchased over 10 years ago.

 

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#3 MadmanRB

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 12:01 PM

Transcend from what I know is a very reliable brand so I would say buying a ram stick from them seems like a good idea.

From what I can gather Cheval seems not so good so transcend is your best bet.

But if you can afford a kingston go for it, same with corsair and crucial.


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#4 jonuk76

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 01:38 PM

Having had numerous power supply failures, I always take account of the warranty period with them.  Having suffered several GPU failures, I usually take account of the warranty with them.  Disks are another area prone to eventual failure, although I've been pretty lucky on the whole with them.  I have never had a RAM failure, apart from, similar to louis, the odd module that was bad from the start that was replaced by the supplier.  

 

I tend to think if RAM is bad, it's going to show up very early. Therefore, I'm not terribly bothered about long warranty's on it.  Obviously lifetime warranty gives peace of mind, but they wouldn't be so keen to offer it if the item was prone to fail within it's normal usable lifetime.  I dare say I've got sticks of SDRAM lying around in a spares box from nearly 20 years ago, which I'd wager still works.


Edited by jonuk76, 30 July 2017 - 01:40 PM.

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#5 britechguy

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 04:32 PM

I am with hamluis and jonuk76 on this.  I have used every brand name and no-name memory you can probably imagine since the mid-1980s and I've actually never had a single RAM failure.


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#6 tantrik

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 12:56 AM

For the past 20 years, I have bought RAM produced by many known and unknown manufacturers.

 

I have used every brand name and no-name memory you can probably imagine since the mid-1980s and I've actually never had a single RAM failure.

 

Is it safe to install ram from unknown manufacturers? I read in few sites stating that non-brand/no-name ram from unknown manufacturers may cause motherboard failures including attached parts (i.e., hdd, dvdrom etc). It is also written that ram should be installed according to the QVL (qualified vendors list) provided by the motherboard manufacturer in their website. It is not safe to install ram in a motherboard that it does not "accept" and is not recommended by the motherboard manufacturers in the QVL. I am a bit confused here. It would be great if someone can shed some light in here. Thanks. 



#7 britechguy

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 08:46 AM

Memory should, ideally be matched to what is in the machine, exactly, when it comes to form factor.  But that's about all.

 

Someone recently asked whether DDR3L could be used in place of DDR3, and it can.  So even the above is not strictly true when there are backward compatible variants within a form factor class.

 

You have your answer from at least two members based on what I know to be decades of combined experience on both our parts.  If you have the right form factor and specs it shouldn't matter one whit who made the stuff as far as "safety" of installing it.  A very great amount of memory marketed under the various brand names is made to spec by the lowest bidder, not the company whose name it's sold under.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#8 Drillingmachine

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 09:04 AM

Is it safe to install ram from unknown manufacturers? I read in few sites stating that non-brand/no-name ram from unknown manufacturers may cause motherboard failures including attached parts (i.e., hdd, dvdrom etc). It is also written that ram should be installed according to the QVL (qualified vendors list) provided by the motherboard manufacturer in their website. It is not safe to install ram in a motherboard that it does not "accept" and is not recommended by the motherboard manufacturers in the QVL. I am a bit confused here. It would be great if someone can shed some light in here. Thanks.


I have never looked any QVL lists because they are 100% useless. QVL lists are made simply by following procedure: Motherboard manufacturer takes one memory stick or kit, then tests if it works on motherboard. If it works, it gets to QVL list.

Problem is that while that specific memory stick works on motherboard manufacturer tests it, it's impossible to say if "same" memory also works on "same" motherboard you buy. No matter if both are "same", they are still different units.

So no problem buying "cheap" RAM.

Edited by Drillingmachine, 31 July 2017 - 09:05 AM.


#9 dc3

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 09:35 AM

Brian suggested that you add modules which match exactly what you have installed but didn't explain why.  Your motherboard is capable of running in dual channel which effectively doubles the throughput speed of the RAM.  In order to run in dual channel it is best to use a matched pair of modules.  If the modules aren't matched it is possible that the RAM will not run in dual channel.  There are programs which will provide you with the make and model of the module you currently have installed, CPU-Z is one which I like, you can download the latest version here.

 

After you have downloaded and install CPU-Z click on the SPD tab.

 

In the upper left portion of the screen you will see Memory Slot Selection, you will need to find the slot which contains your module using this.  Once you have found the module CPU-Z will list all of the modules' specification including the manufacturer and part number.  You can Google the part number and should be able to find this module for sale.  If you need help with this post the part number and I will see what I can find for you.


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#10 britechguy

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 09:39 AM

I also recommend Crucial's System Scanner for finding out the type or types of memory that will work in your system, how many actual slots the system has, and what the maximum amount of memory the system will take is as well.

 

I have mixed modules in the past but knew when I did so that, in most cases, dual channel, if it can run at all, would run at the speed of the slowest memory module.  I generally don't mix modules.


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      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#11 dc3

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 10:02 AM

If all the OP wishes to do is increase the amount of RAM purchasing the same make and model of the module installed would be the least expensive way to go.  As for the specifications, if you Google the motherboard you will find the following.

 

Memory

Number of Memory Slots         2×240pin

Memory Standard                   DDR3 1600/1333/1066

Maximum Memory Supported   16GB

Channel Supported                  Dual Channel

 

The OP already knows that the module installed works, so they know what will work in this computer.


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#12 tantrik

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 11:07 AM

Thanks everyone for sharing your knowledge, experiences and suggestion in this matter. Really helped me to decide in choosing the right ram. Highly appreciate it.



#13 Kilroy

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 03:56 PM

My question would be, how long to you expect to keep this machine?  What good is a lifetime warranty if you're going to be replacing the machine in three to five years?  I found out early on that when I built a new machine that normally meant buying a new CPU, Motherboard, RAM, and Video card.  So, most likely the RAM you buy today won't work in your next machine.  Most electronics will fail in the first 90 days.  After that you should expect a normal life span from the product.

 

 

 



#14 tantrik

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 06:26 AM

Thanks for the valuable info. 


Edited by hamluis, 02 August 2017 - 06:29 AM.
Removed quotebox - Hamluis.





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