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Why Can't I get My PC Output Audio to Ballance?


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#1 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 12:40 AM

I have tried everything, and I can't see anything in the audio software which comes with Windows 10 that is not right.  

The problem is the left ear is very, very quiet, and the right ear is okay.  Here's the thing though.  I have a mixer, and it has a USB connection to the computer for input from the mixer and output from the PC into the mixer.  It's a two way street on the USB between both units.  When I open my PC audio software settings, and I choose the CODEC speaker output for my mixer, the audio is perfect.  It's really great.  

So basically audio out of the USB jack on the PC is good, but audio out of the speaker jack on the PC is wobbly.  

 

Any advice on this sort of thing?  



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#2 Platypus

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 05:13 AM

In that case it appears to be either the connection inside the socket or onto the circuit board track is broken on the left channel, and only a tiny amount of signal can sneak through with capacitive coupling, or the sound chip on the mainboard has become faulty.

Either way, using a USB audio device instead is a common solution to that symptom.

Edited by Platypus, 30 July 2017 - 05:14 AM.

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#3 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 06:39 PM

Doesn't that mean the whole motherboard is shot if I wanted to ever fix that?  Or is it fixable?

 

The problem with the USB cord between my mixer is that it is hissy.  Obviously there's a ground loop of some kind in it.  

 

I solved the USB hiss problem by running a 3.5mm out of the PC's speaker jack out to a mic input on my mixer with a ground loop canceler plugged into the line and the mixer mic input at the same time to bridge the line and the mixer.  No hiss in that as a result, but then the speaker balance became a problem after a while.  

Really though I like that line out of the speaker jack of the PC because I can put sound effects and EQ the audio on my mixer that way.  I'd like to get that ability back, but what should I do?



#4 MrSippi

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 07:03 PM

How about an audio card?


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#5 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 07:42 PM

Yep, you're right.  I hear the external audio card is better than the internal?  What do you say?  



#6 MrSippi

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 07:59 PM

I always use external audio and video cards because they are just better. Also they free up your rams for other things. I use SB Audigy in mine. I always liked Soundblaster since my 386 days.


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#7 Platypus

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 08:09 PM

Doesn't that mean the whole motherboard is shot if I wanted to ever fix that?  Or is it fixable?


If the cause is a cracked copper track or solder joint, it can likely be repaired, if it's in the sound chip on the board, not worth it, use a USB sound module.

The problem with the USB cord between my mixer is that it is hissy. Obviously there's a ground loop of some kind in it.


A ground loop causes hum, not hiss. Getting hiss in the sound means the level and gain settings on the mixer are set inappropriately, or the mixer is just poor quality.

Using a decent USB sound module you'll be able to use effects and should have better sound quality than the onboard.
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#8 jonuk76

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 12:01 AM

Just a few thoughts...

 

Some motherboard sound implementations may possibly allow you to assign a different port to front L & R speakers. I've seen in some cases you can plug in speakers into a port and the Realtek software (if jack auto-detection enabled) will ask "what did you just plug in?".  You might be able to plug the speakers into say the port for rear speakers, and use the driver to set the port to actually output front speaker sound.  This may help determine if it's a problem with the port itself.

 

I use USB audio (a USB DAC). I did at one time have a ground loop on it, which was incredibly annoying.  Rather than a hum, it resulted in very strange high pitched "digital" sounding interference (e.g. when there was disk activity on the PC, you would hear it through the speakers, even moving the mouse around could be heard through the speakers). It's cause was eventually traced to a faulty RCA cable going from the USB DAC to my active speakers.  During the course of fault finding I bought a "hum destroyer", which actually revealed the underlying problem straight away as one channel wasn't working through it... Behringer hum destroyer  Replaced the bad cable, and all was good, and I probably didn't even need the hum destroyer.


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#9 F-1DeskLamp

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 01:22 AM

Thanks 






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