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ssd decreased longevity from frequent backups?


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#1 feivel

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 10:07 PM

i have a pc with my main drive a samsung ssd. i image back it up daily with two programs that put the backups on another drive which is sata.
what im concerned about is: will all that daily disk activity significantly shorten the life of my ssd?
if so ill only back up weekly with only one program.
(im using acronis and macrium)

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#2 jonuk76

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 12:33 AM

AFAIK it's only write activity that contributes to wear on an SSD.  They have a finite life span with regards to the number of writes they can handle.  I'm not aware of any amount of read activity wearing an SSD.  As imaging an SSD to another drive is not going to contribute to significant writing, I don't think it will have much effect.  The manufacturers software (i.e. Samsung Magician) will report the amount of "wear" on the SSD.


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#3 feivel

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 04:52 AM

good to know. thank you

#4 Kilroy

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 03:32 PM

As jonuk76 said it is writes, not reads that are limited on Solid State Drives (SSD).  Take a read of this article.  The first drive didn't have issues until after 100 terabytes of writes, that is equal to filling a 256GB drive 400 times, a 512GB drive 200 times.  The first drive didn't actually fail until 700 terabytes.  So, long story short, consumers will be hard pressed to write a drive to death.






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