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Connective Editing - Handhelds snappier than computers


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#1 Giannutri

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 03:40 PM

OHMMMMM

 

My name is Steven L., I live in Rome / Island of Giglio, Italy, and I work as a translator of movie scripts (from Italian to English).

I know a lot about editing.  So much in fact, that though not a programmer, I'm going to "conceptually" make the best editor on planet earth for flat screens (phablets and tablets).

One that will not only outperform the present methods, but transcend them. An editing method with a very slight learning curve, a no-brainer, more a matter of "getting the hang of it" than mastering heavens knows what arcane technology.

Ready?

Okay, here we go:

 

HOW TO MAKE EDITING

ON FLATSCREENS FASTER

THAN SIT-ON-YOUR-BUTT

COMPUTERS!

 

Blind Mechanics

Pondered Purpose

Microsoft Anomaly

Geography

RE-CONNECTIONS

William Shakespeare highlights text and then hits Backspace.

 

shakespeare.jpg

 

Then a monkey who's been sipping Sangria all day does the same thing.

 

chimps-and-magic_650x400_71455795144.jpg

 

What happens in both cases?

 

In both cases the value just beyond the tippy-tippy end of the highlighting (no matter what it is) gets connected to the cursor position.

EVERY SINGLE TIME

Therefore we may say that highlighting to delete is connective in its blind mechanics.

But what is the difference between Shakespeare's act and the monkey's?

A famous French philosopher 

 

Screen-Shot-2014-09-15-at-13-32-00.jpg

would assert that there is no difference

but 9 out of 10 rabbis would agree

o-RABBIS-900.jpg?6

 

That Shakespeare ends the highlighting where he does precisely because he WANTS TO CONNECT to the value just beyond the tippy-tippy end of the highlighting. 

 

So now we see that highlighting to delete is connective in its blind mechanics for both man and beast but, with the possible exclusion of French Philosophers, connective in its pondered purpose...

 

The Microsoft Anomaly

God is in the details

(and so is Bill Gates)

 

I'm now going to point your attention to something which is apparently insignificant (surely a bit philosophical and nerdy)

but trust me,

the Microsoft Anomaly is what is preventing our editing experience on the handhelds from being easy, fun, precise and productive

 

Why does one go through the trouble of highlighting text? Principally for 4 reasons (of course I'm generalizing).

1. To format - that is, to prettify deserving text that will live on in the final document.

2. To copy and paste - that is, to repeat deserving text that will live on in the final document.

3. To cut and paste - that is, to better position deserving text that will live on in the final document.

 

and then

 

4. To kill, dump, obliterate, destroy, annihilate undeserving text that obviously will NOT live on in the final document.

 

Notice the anomaly? We are forced to lavish the same attention on the garbage as the deserving words - the gems.

GemGroups-300x300.png

garbage-640x426.jpg

Let keen eye maneuver pudgy finger to drag small handle over teensy text until the glow is 

just right  and then... destroy!!!

(kinda like being forced to polish a vase before smashing it with a sledgehammer)

 

In cases 1,2,3 above, the operator is interested in the text he has bothered to highlight.

 

In case 4 instead, the operator is NOT AT ALL INTERESTED.

 

In fact the highlighting can be construed as an indicator pointing to the ONLY thing he is interested in: the value immediately OUTSIDE the highlighting.

 

Merry splinter Kleenex guardrail whippersnapper tear Boeing shoebox→Christmas

 

Jack and Jill splinter Kleenex guardrail whippersnapper tear Boeing shoebox→went up the hill

 

All the text INSIDE the highlighting is quite literally garbage that needs to be removed IN ORDER TO CONNECT

 

So at present when we highlight to delete, we are most definitely connecting, but the process happens by garbage disposal...

 

We begin the highlighting at the very beginning of the "bad stuff" (what we need to eliminate) and we end the highlighting at the very end of the "bad stuff" and then we hit backspace.

 

Okay

Compared to the ease of selection on regular computers, with their big physical keyboards, mice and function keys, highlighting text on the flat screens (tablets and phablets) is such a big drag, such a deterrent to happy and easy editing, that this negativity engendered a whole new gadget industry: EXTERNAL KEYBOARDS.

 

External keyboards on a mobile device? Hey whatever floats your boat... but remember that along with that extra gadget you're also connecting yourself to a chair and table.

 

No doubt Ikea is happy, but are you?

 

Kindly follow my reasoning a second

 

If highlighting to delete is ALWAYS connective in its mechanics (even for drunken monkeys) and, except for "bulk" deletions connective in its purpose, then why not just connect directly to the desired value, WITHOUT fussing over the garbage words?

HERE'S THE THING:

when editing is focused

and you highlight to delete

isn't WHAT YOU WANT

ALWAYS

just beyond the highlighting?

It had better be, 'cause like it or not,

that's what you're gonna get

EACH & EVERY TIME!!

 

snow-monkey-.png

So instead of selecting the FULL LENGTH

of the garbage -

by literally CARESSING it with a finger

up to and excluding what you want

and then hitting Backspace

why not

CALL WHAT YOU WANT

DIRECTLY

TO THE CURSOR

and by connecting,

allow the deletion to take care of itself?

 

Give me a button, please!

No, wait, kindly make that two buttons!

 

Okay... imagine working on a portable flat screen device with an irate editor breathing down your neck. You compose the following paragraph:

 

170px-Washington_1772.jpg

The man in charge was a tall and proud-looking figure, extremely elegant in his handmade suit... none other than the future president of the United States, George Washington.

 

The editor snarls: "Never mind the nonsense, just give me the dirt! The man in charge was... ??!!"

Washington!

Starts with a "W"

Okay, normally I would highlight up to and EXCLUDING the "W" of Washington... Now instead, I will call that "W" of Washington to the Cursor.

 

The man in charge was W[§]a tall and proud-looking figure, extremely elegant in his handmade suit... none other than the future president of the United States, George Washington.

 

Whoa! - Lucky shot! - in this case, you erased 22 words with a "tap-BAM!"

 

Two finger "exertions"... The first a "W" for "Washington" from the keyboard and the second a tap on [§] - the "connect" button I would like to see implemented as an option on a txt editor's extra keyboard row.

 

The [§] button checks the value immediately to the left of the cursor, and then cancels to the right up to and including that same value, case insensitive.

 

With iA Writer, the app store's best-selling editing program, (no doubt because of a highlighting system that does away with finger-painting), the same task would have required 28 taps on four different buttons.

 

2 taps on SHIFT (also CapsLock) to enter selection mode

23 taps on forward word select to highlight up to and including "George".

1 tap on forward character select to also highlight the space before "Washington".

1 tap on Backspace to delete

1 concluding tap on SHIFT to get out of selection mode or else everything you write will be in CAPITAL LETTERS.

 

Think about it: just to get started, iA Writer required 2 taps on shift. In that same time span and expenditure of effort "connective editing" completed the task. 

Just saying!

 

Oh no no no!

Wait a minute here!!!!... UNDO!!

The man in charge was George Washington...

 

Have [§] deliver George!

 

How many taps to reach George? I don't know... (who's counting G's?) all I know is that hitting [§] after tapping in a "G" will inescapably deliver George to me.

 

[§] is absolutely simple and faithful! [§] will bring EVERY "G" or "g" to me.

 

Not much of a learning curve, is there? The concept is quite similar to calling contacts on a cell phone.

 

The man in charge was G[§]a tall and proud-looking figure, extremely elegant in his handmade suit... none other than the future president of the United States, George Washington.

 

In this case, the "effort" count turns out to be:

 

The insertion of a "G" from the keyboard

4 taps on [§].

For a total of 5 finger exertions.

 

 

How long did it take [§]?

 

Half a second? With my finger "monkey-tapping" on the same button, the process was easy and lazy... and with each tap, I saw "George" come bounding to the cursor position where I wanted it.

 

Hey George! George!!!

 

But wait! There's BOOSTER MODE

 

To be continued


Edited by Giannutri, 28 July 2017 - 11:17 AM.


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#2 Just_One_Question

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 04:58 PM

I'm telling you, man. When it comes to design, Italians just get it...

Pininfarina:)



#3 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 04:34 PM

@Gianutri #1

 

You reported this topic because you could no longer edit it. That is because you only have 24 hours to edit a post from the time the original was made and this time limit had been exceeded, if only just, when you tried to make your third (?) edit.

 

I had a look at your first effort last night and, while I am not in the least bit clear about the purpose of your topic, this is General Chat and you are welcome to continue with a second post. For the future I would suggest that if you are thinking of making a long post which might require you to think it out in stages that you do your thinking and then post it all in one go.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#4 Just_One_Question

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 04:48 PM

I'm curious, would you call yourself a minimalist, Giannutri? :)


Edited by Just_One_Question, 28 July 2017 - 04:49 PM.


#5 mjd420nova

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 07:43 PM

As the market progresses, the number of jobs asked of a handheld or tablet is small compared to a PC.  The processors have a reduced instruction set and the OS is trimmed down to fit the reduced ram sizes in portables.  Sure they are faster but rather limited in function compared to any PC on the market today.



#6 Giannutri

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 12:22 AM

@Gianutri #1

 

You reported this topic because you could no longer edit it. That is because you only have 24 hours to edit a post from the time the original was made and this time limit had been exceeded, if only just, when you tried to make your third (?) edit.

 

I had a look at your first effort last night and, while I am not in the least bit clear about the purpose of your topic, this is General Chat and you are welcome to continue with a second post. For the future I would suggest that if you are thinking of making a long post which might require you to think it out in stages that you do your thinking and then post it all in one go.

 

Chris Cosgrove

 

Thank you... and sorry for the disturbance. 

 

I'll wrap it up in a post or two.

 

The purpose of the topic is to improve editing on the handhelds through "Connective Editing" - a system that does away with "finger-painting"... (keen eye maneuvering tiny handle over text until the highlighting is "just so" and one can hit backspace to effect a forward deletion).

 

I kept editing the post, figuring on having all the info in one place. 



#7 Giannutri

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 12:54 AM

I'm curious, would you call yourself a minimalist, Giannutri? :)

 

Ciao JOQ, 

Me? I've got the programmining skills of a slug... more than "Minimalist" I'm a lazy bastard who unfortunately must work very hard. 

 

So back in 1987, when tablets were still those things made of mud that the Ancient Sumerians used to write on, using Word5 for DOS I invented, or rather cobbled together a silly little macro, dedicated to a bizarre purpose.

 

Think about it: I translate movie scripts from Italian to English.... That means I have to read a portion, translate a portion and then delete a portion.

 

Read-write-delete - read-write-delete - read write delete (the average screenplay is 20k words).

 

Well there was only one exception to this read-write-delete stuff... and that was for Character Names.

 

They, the character names never changed... they were "good-to-go"... "Giuseppe" didn't become Joseph, Mussolini was also Mussolini in my English translation.

 

Seeing as the character names were "good-to-go," why not simply connect to them? Why not just tap in the initial and then connect to them... and by connecting let the deletion take care of itself?

 

So I invented this (after smoking about 5 cartons of cigarettes, trying to figure out what a variable was):

 

<LEFT>«SET X=SELECTION»<RIGHT><F6><ESC>S«X»<TAB>D<ENTER><DEL>

 

...and arbitrarily assigned it to <CTRL-L>

 

But what started off as a silly little word-connector... proved to be quite prodigious....

 

And I will prove it to you in another post...

 

But just to prove that I'm stupid but not crazy, I can anticipate that I've had one "partial" implementation by a very good text editor in the iOS spehere.

 

http://www.infovole.de/en/this-and-that/more-freedom-for-translators-with-textkraft/

 

The program (in iOS) is called TextKraft Pro and is deservedly well regarded.

 

Naturally as a non-programmer, just a translator making a suggestion from the "factory floor," I was thrilled to see my idea becoming a button on a good, solid editing program. 

 

 

Textkraft320_Ext-Forward-Delete_EN.png

 

It's for scribes... For handhelds, most people just need the writing capabilities good for Tweets and Whatsapps. But if you're a scribe and you don't wanna be chained and you like / need the freedom of just whipping out a device and working PRODUCTIVELY, then Connective Editing is the way to go. 

 

Try it out... 


Edited by Giannutri, 29 July 2017 - 03:52 AM.


#8 Giannutri

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 01:03 AM

As the market progresses, the number of jobs asked of a handheld or tablet is small compared to a PC.  The processors have a reduced instruction set and the OS is trimmed down to fit the reduced ram sizes in portables.  Sure they are faster but rather limited in function compared to any PC on the market today.

Hello mjd42nova,

 

I'm a great believer in the word "AND"... put it this way: your kitchen most likely has a rather rich variety of stirring systems.

 

You've got a tiny teaspoon for stirring your tea... you've got a whisk, a mini-pimer, a blender... They are not in competition... I guess the blender is the strongest, but you don't need to take it out to stir your espresso.

 

Well... a computer is like that blender... it's undoubtedly the best... and you can even add all sorts of funky attachments... but where it falls miserably short is on a park bench... or while waiting in the car for the kids to get outta school... or while slouching on the couch with your feet up... 

 

My invention is for scribes... people who write a lot and don't wish to be chained all day and night and afternoon at their computers.

 

Sometimes "good enough" is the best. 

 

I know that "Connective Editing" is GREAT because... 

 

...NEXT POST...


Edited by Giannutri, 29 July 2017 - 01:50 AM.


#9 Giannutri

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 01:58 AM

Connective editing is GREAT BECAUSE...

 

Using one and the same action button I can

 

1. Cancel word for word at a single tap and then go on canceling them consecutively (machine gun style)

 

2. Cancel paragraph for paragraph at a single touch and then go on canceling them consecutively (machine gun style).

 

3. Cancel from anywhere within a paragraph to the end of the same paragraph in never more than two "finger exertions" - A tap on <ENTER> where you wish to end the paragraph immediately followed by the action button [§]

 

4. Cancel to the first instance of any whatsoever punctuation mark and symbol in never more than two touches.

 

5. Cancel to any word with "X" amount of finger exertions, but really fast (in the normal ambit of editing)

 

The title of this thread is Handhelds snappier than computers.

 

What I wrote above are claims... in the next posts, that will carry on where the LOOOOOONG one got cut off, I will substantiate them... 



#10 Giannutri

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 02:32 AM

But wait! There's BOOSTER MODE

[=]

WARNING

 

This is embarrassing, because, what you're seeing with the use of [§] and [=] to deletively connect to words, reeks very strongly of ancient Nokia / Samsung phone technology... 

Pretend that all the words in your text are names (BTW: in English the words "noun" and "name" actually share their etymology)
Now consider the normal ambit of editing. Generally it is quite circumscribed. All the more so, if you consider the viewable screen real estate of a handheld.
 

The "AMBIT"
 

As you proceed from editing operation to editing operation, the ambit, the range of words you are operating on changes.

Now imagine that each and every one of those single ambits is momentarily like the full list of your telephone contacts in yesterday's old and glorious Nokia . 

For example if the sentence you are working on has 25 words, then in that moment your old Nokia phone has 25 contacts. Then in the next editing ambit it might have only 5 names and the one after that 100.

So words are like names on your old Nokia, except now, when you connect to a name, you cancel everything up to that word/name.
 

Okay in the LOOOOOOONG post we saw how [§] brought the "G" of "George" to the cursor in 5 finger exertions.

 

The man in charge was G[§][§][§][§]a tall and proud-looking figure, extremely elegant in his handmade suit... none other than the future president of the United States, George Washington.

iA writer would've taken approx 28 exertions. But we can do much better.

Enter [=] booster mode

 

The Booster Button  [=]  reads TWO characters to the left of the cursor position and then cancels to the right up to and including those same two values, case insensitive.

 

The man in charge was Ge[=]a tall and proud-looking figure, extremely elegant in his handmade suit... none other than the future president of the United States, George Washington.

 

This time only 3 finger exertions.

First a "G" then an "e" and then  [=]

With sound effects it would be:

"Tah-tah-BAM!"

No, wait a minute!

 

There’s no need to write "Ge" to reach "George"... just tap in a "G" and booster mode will deliver only space-G or space-g to the cursor, that is to say, only those words that start with a "G" or a "g", thus vastly improving the connective power.

 

The man in charge was G[=]a tall and proud-looking figure, extremely elegant in his handmade suit... none other than the future president of the United States, George Washington.

G[=]

2 taps

 

The man in charge was "Tah-BAM!"

iA Writer - 28 finger interventions on 4 different buttons.

The man in charge was

 

"Shift-Shift -word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-word-Character-Character-BACKSPACE-Shift"

 

The finger painting method is harder to quantify:

Tap-tap to highlight "a"

touch to grab mini-handle

drag mini handle up to and excluding "George"

Backspace (once or twice)

(in practice, if "George" is beyond the reach of

your handle-dragging finger,

then you  highlight up to as far as you can,

reposition cursor in front of

"George" and hit backspace

as many times as necessary)

 

How does that compare to "G" - TAP?

With "Connective Editing", you never lifted your finger from the keyboard, and there was no precision work requiring tiresome eye-finger coordination.

WAIT UNDO!!! Chop the paragraph down to:

The man in charge was none other than George Washington

 

The man in charge was n[=]a tall and proud-looking figure, extremely elegant in his handmade suit... none other than G[=]the future president of the United States, George Washington

 

Using connective editing, the two separate editing interventions add up to a grand total of 4 taps

 

n[=] - 2 taps

G[=] - 2 taps.

 

iA Writer? 33 finger exertions!

Finger painting method? Do you even want to go there?

Blown outta the water!

 

Could it be that the programmers have us poor scribes working too hard? Rhetorical question. The answer is a resounding:

 

YES!

We are slaves to the “Microsoft Anomaly” which requires us to cover the whole territory of garbage instead of getting what we want with a click or two.

 

Though lamentable, the whole territory method is okay on computers, but for the flatscreens it bogs things down tremendously.

 

Now do you understand the Microsoft Anomaly?

 

There is no need for all that garbage-caressing or garbage-tap-tapping when you can easily connect.

 

And you ain't seen nothing yet!

Consider what else [§] can do.

 

With [§], canceling from the cursor position to the first instance of any whatsoever punctuation mark or symbol - characters such as...

 

! ( ) = ? , " : ; £ $ % & / - _ # § ' [ } * +  etc.

 

....only requires TWO TAPS - regardless of the amount of text between the cursor position and the punctuation mark or symbol.

 

It's connective

So distance doesn't matter

 

We are all familiar with "connective reading" (hypertext browsing - well this is connective editing. It too uses links and works with 2 buttons (mostly one actually).

Don't delete, connect!

 

WATCH

 

 neumann3_medium.jpg        John_von_Neumann_2003_Hungarian_stamp.jp

Task: cancel the first part of the paragraph below and leave the quote with the quotation marks.

 

In the words of the great Hungarian scientist Janos von Neumann: "If people do not believe that mathematics is simple, it is only because they do not realize how complicated life is."

 

"[§]In the words of the great Hungarian scientist Janos von Neumann: "If people do not believe that mathematics is simple, it is only because they do not realize how complicated life is."

The Connective Editing method: 2 taps, one on the keyboard to proactively insert the link, in this case a quotation mark (") and the other on the [§] button.

 

Is there a snappier method out there? I haven't seen it. I'm sure that deep in the underground Google Artificial Intelligence laboratories (floating on the blood of Cossacks) there's a better way.

 

But I've spent a small fortune on text editing apps both for iOS and Android, and I haven't seen anything coming close.

 

So - ladies and gents... if you are presently required to apply more than two "finger touches" to cancel to a comma, a period, a colon, a question mark, an open parenthesis.... etc. etc. etc.

If your editing program requires you to place thine finger upon yon screen to maneuver a miniscule thingamabob... it means that the great geniuses who normally do stuff that is indistinguishable from magic, are...

 

MAKING YOU WORK TOO HARD

and they are afraid of simple learning curves

 

The real problem is that everyone already  knows how to edit and there's nothing to learn... we've all been toilet trained on the Microsoft Anomaly...

 

But stop and consider... Did you know that EDITING is connective even in the Geography of any text?

 

EH????!

 

Next post... For now take out your smartphone, phablet, or tablet and cancel a single word with the "normal" method...

Count the touches...

They are 4  in all for a single word.

tap-tap to highlight, Backspace to delete, andother backsapce to "micro-correct" the double space.

That is scandalous!


Edited by Giannutri, 29 July 2017 - 10:29 AM.


#11 Giannutri

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 11:05 AM

HOW TO MAKE EDITING

ON FLATSCREENS FASTER

THAN SIT-ON-YOUR-BUTT

COMPUTERS!

 

Blind Mechanics

Pondered Purpose

Microsoft Anomaly

Geography

RE-CONNECTIONS

 

We have reached GEOGRAPHY

TEXT editing is CONNECTIVE even in its "GEOGRAPHY"

Open any text in a WP program (like MS Word or LibreOffice) that allows one to see non-printing characters, and check out what you see right before and right after every paragraph.

 

You will see a Pilcrow - this: ¶

Pilcrow.jpg

 

 They're in the lay of the land,  the geography of any text so to speak. And goodness gracious they even look like links!

before and after

...hmm...

 Now review the instruction that my proposed button No. 1 obeys:

[§] checks the value immediately to the left of the cursor, and then cancels to the right up to and including that same value, case insensitive.

This means that if [§] is tapped at the head of a paragraph, [§] looks to the left, sees a "¶" and cancels to the right, up to and including the first "¶" it finds, effectively gobbling the paragraph in the middle.

AT A SINGLE TAP

 

Beat that you smart programmers!

 

What's more you can then go on zapping other paragraphs with further taps on [§] (machine gun style)

POWERFUL consecutive action from the comfort of your virtual keyboard.

 

VERY USEFUL COROLLARY

To cancel from anywhere within a paragraph to the end of the same paragraph, no matter how long the paragraph in question, all one needs to do is hit <ENTER> where one wishes to end the text, followed by [§].

A paragraph from Alice in Wonderland

 

The hole went straight on for some way and then turned down with a sharp bend, so sharp that Alice had no time to think to stop till she found herself falling in what seemed a deep well

 

Okay, let's cancel the Alice paragraph, starting right after the word "straight" on the first line.

 The hole went straight¶ (hitting <ENTER> creates the link)

[§]on for some way and then turned down with a sharp bend, so sharp that Alice had no time to think to stop till she found herself falling in what seemed a deep well.¶

 

By hitting <ENTER> YOU proactively create the link that allows [§] to kill paragraphs.

 

No matter how much text is involved, deleting a paragraph only requires a single tap:

[§]

(tah!)

 

And no matter how much text is involved, to cancel from anywhere inside a paragraph to the end of the selfsame only requires 2 finger exertions.

<ENTER>[§]

(tah-tah!)

 

Now, returning to the LibreOffice page with the "see non-printing characters" toggle ON, zoom in even tighter and notice something else which is extraordinarily useful for editing.

Before and after every word there is a space of some sort and the VAST MAJORITY are spacebar spaces.

 

dots.jpg

 

This means that if [§] is tapped at the head of a word…

 WAIT!

...first let's recall what it takes in the year 2017 to cancel a single word on the handheld flatscreens.

 

Native system (iOS / Android)      

tap-tap on screen to highlight word

Backspace to delete

Backspace again to micro-correct the double space.

4 FINGER EXERTIONS!

((((that means more exertions to delete words like bat, hat, cat than to write them)))

 

Connective Editing: 1 tap

 

At the head of the word simply tap [§]

[§] reads the space in front of the word and cancels up to and including the next space it finds, effectively "gobbling" the word in the middle.

 

What's more, [§] remains in position to go on "gobbling" single words with successive machine gun taps - because the operator's finger is still on the [§] button.

WOW

 

With connective editing it's as if every paragraph and word came with its own incorporated quick deletion link.

 

Notice something else: what I'm proposing for outta-your-pocket devices is faster and involves less anatomy than what's normal even on computers!

 

·         Single word deletion - 1 touch - also consecutive action

·         Single paragraph - 1 touch - also consecutive action

·         Anywhere in para. to end of same para. - 2 touches

·         Any punctuation mark / symbol - 2 touches - consecutive action

·         Any word - "X" amount of touches - but  in the normal ambit of editing [=] often seems uncanny. Try it yourself!

 

Imagine what editing on the flatscreens could be like if we broke free of the "Microsoft Whammy", that is, of garbage selection followed by backspace and moved on to Connectivity!

But we all know how to edit, right? What we learned is eternal and can't be changed!  And there's nothing better...

 

How many taps was it to kill a word?... 4?!...

Well now you know it only takes one... 

 

Imagine doing your business in the bathroom and instead of a simple pull of the chain to flush, you also had to stomp a foot, clap a hand and blink an eye!


Edited by Giannutri, 30 July 2017 - 06:53 AM.


#12 Giannutri

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 03:57 PM

EDITING IS

RE-CONNECTIVE

 

What is editing?

Well, unlike creative writing which fills a blank screen at the speed of inspiration…

 

Once upon a long long time ago in a faraway kingdom…

 

…editing changes text that’s already written, generally for the purpose of improving it. Words are added or removed, phrases are embellished or sharpened. There is change change change…. 

but then

INVARIABLY

 a reconnection to something the writer is happy with

(at least for the time being)

 

FOR EXAMPLE

 

It was a gloriously luminous day.

 

Re-reading his novel the writer reaches that short stretch of prose and curls his nose.

"Gloriously luminous?" Bleah! What's wrong with "sunny"?

 

So he taps in the improvement:

 

It was a sunny gloriously luminous day.

 

Now obviously, "gloriously luminous" has to go - that's not in question. The real question is: what's on the writer's mind?

 

Is he keen on canceling "gloriously luminous" because he doesn't like those words? You might think so, but you'd be wrong. That matter was settled the second he tapped in "sunny". At this point it's ancient history.

 

Now all he really wants to do is re-connect to his good-to-go word, the word he's happy with, which in this case is obviously "day".

It was a sunny.... what?

It was a sunny "d" for "day".

 

It was a sunny d[§]gloriously luminous day.

 

Connective editing is actually closer to how busy editors think! They change and reconnect, change and reconnect. Except presently they are reconnecting by garbage disposal and so the connectivity of the whole exercise isn't fully appreciated.

 

Check it out yourself. Pay attention, even if you highlight to delete... you will notice that you're always always always re-connecting... if not to a word, to a position (i.e. end of paragraph).

 

So along with being easier and faster Connective Editing is really and truly closer to editing.

 

 

 

EDITING IS

Connective in its blind mechanics

Connective in its pondered purpose

Connective in its Geography

Re-connective in its common usage

 

But with the exception of one app

TEXTKRAFT PRO

that created a very good but timid "extended forward delete" button  

after a feature request from your's truly

all the connection is done via garbage disposal

 

The text editor situation in the Android sphere (which in general I would prefer) is tragic. For txt editing iOS (ipad) has Android beat like the Germans vs Brazil in the last world cup.


Edited by Giannutri, 30 July 2017 - 01:34 PM.


#13 Giannutri

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 12:11 AM

RETRO-TAPPING - THE BACKBEAT OF JOY

Connectivity is FECUND... We have all witnessed what connective reading, aka BROWSING has brought to the world. Well though of course, in a proportionately smaller dimension (in the natural ratio of the Content creators vis-à-vis the content receivers), even CONNECTIVE EDITING could bring lots of surprises. 

 

Always bear in mind that [§] and [=] are very similar to mouse buttons and that they react to values that are either found or placed before them.

 

Those values ARE LINKS.

 

So reserved combinations could behave differently than the default forward delete.

For example "\\" followed by [=] could translate the current paragraph into French (or call your spouse, or play music, or order pizza).

 

But for folks who would like to have an easy and powerful, out-of-the-pocket writing/editing instrument, a hardware synergy would be ideal.

 

BEATIFIC VISION

(if I were the Sultan of Silicon Valley)

 

In my life I've translated hundreds of scripts, treatments and synopses in less than ideal working conditions, using out-of-my-pocket, instant-on devices, armed with [§] and [=] as macros.

 

flats.jpg

 

For productive editing, all the devices were clunky, but paradoxically, NONE quite as unwieldy as the modern flat screens!

 

That's because scribes are no longer the privileged end-users. Writing is not what the flatscreens do, but what they can also sorta do.

 

Retro-Tapping to the rescue!

 

With Connective Editing, there'd be a way to make editing on phablets and tablets as ergonomic as playing a musical instrument.

 

Hold your phablet in landscape mode! The front is Tokyo, New York, Paris, London, Seoul... and the back? Except for the camera lens, it's Outer Mongolia, the Sahara Desert, Antarctica.

 

To bring editing on flat screens to the next level, that empty real estate - the battery cover - needs to be civilized with two sensors, one on the left and one on the right.

 

Two sensitized areas allowing for six different commands.

 

Right-tap

Right-tap-tap

Left-tap

Left-tap-tap

Both-tap

Both-tap-tap

 

Two of the six could be dedicated to [§] and [=] and the others to highlighting, copy/cut pasting, and info retrieval.

 

Now always holding your phablet in landscape mode, notice your two middle fingers UNDERNEATH... powerful, accurate, but until now UNEMPLOYED!

fingers.jpg

no wonder they're always so vulgar and angry

With Connective Editing and Retro-Tapping, the top part, screen and virtual keyboard, would be dedicated to creative writing and the bottom part, (the sensitized battery cover) to  creative editing.

 

CREATIVE editing?

pieta.jpg

 

ABSOLUTELY!

 

And the experience would be like playing a musical instrument!

At long last writer-editors (the "scribes") would have devices capable of outperforming computers while walking, slouching, lying in bed, riding on the flatbed of a pick-up truck in Barranquilla.

 

I call it a beatific vision because in the grand scheme of things, scribes are no longer important. My only hope is that some gamesters fall in love with the idea of Retro-Tapping. Now that's a market big enough to get the OEMs interested! Then, when/if the gamesters get retro-tapping... hallelujah, so might the scribes!


Edited by Giannutri, 30 July 2017 - 03:14 PM.


#14 Giannutri

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 01:42 PM

Editing examples using [§] and [=]

Task 1 (paragraph from Alice in Wonderland)

The hole went straight on for some way and then turned down with a sharp bend, so sharp that Alice had no time to think to stop till she found herself falling in what seemed deep well.

Effecting the necessary deletions, edit the Alice paragraph down to the above words in blue:

Alice found herself falling in a well.

Al[=]The hole went straight on for some way and then turned down with a sharp bend, so sharp that Alice had no time to think to stop till she found herself falling in what seemed a deep well.


2 taps on the keyboard to insert "Al" (the initials of "Alice") at the top of the paragraph
1 tap on [=] to delete-connect to "Alice".

Tap to reposition cursor (not counted)

1 tap on the keyboard to insert "f" for "found"
1 tap on [§] to delete-connect to "found"

Alice f[§]had no time to think to stop till she found herself falling in what seemed a deep well. 


Tap to reposition cursor (not counted)
2 consecutive taps on [§] to cancel "what" and "seemed"
tap to reposition cursor (not counted)
One tap on [§] to delete "deep"

TASK completed: 8 finger exertions (excluding cursor placement)

iA Writer 43 exertions (excluding cursor placement)
Textmaker, Jotterpad, Jota+ Android finger-painting? Hard to count...
But for speed, immediacy and precsion you're not going to beat Connective Editing.

================================================
Task 2

Chop down the Neumann paragraph... to only: mathematics is simple

m[§][§]In the words of the great Hungarian scientist Janos von Neumann: "If people do not believe that mathematics is simple<ENTER>[§], it is only because they do not realize how complicated life is."


5 "finger exertions"
"m" from the keyboard, two consecutive taps on [§] to connect to the "m" of mathematics. Then after the word simple. <ENTER> from the keybaord immediately followed by [§].
(With connective editing, to cancel from anywhere in a paragraph to the end of the same paragraph, only requires two taps)
 


Edited by Giannutri, 30 July 2017 - 01:48 PM.


#15 Giannutri

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 01:58 PM

Connective Editing follows the action...  When you edit you think in terms of words / concepts... Well quite often, the sense of things is at the end - the butt - of a word.
 
Okay. this is most likely language specific...
 
In any case, if I were I to talk to a coder, I would ask for a third button on the over-the-keyboard row of my Connective Editor.
 
THE [|] BUTTON
 
The [|] button simply brings the cursor to the end of a word. This is very useful when one uses word connection instead of highlight-deletion. Both [§] and [=] leave the cursor tucked inside the connected word.
[§] one space, [=] either one or two spaces.
Such a cursor position is almost always fruitless and needs to be readily escaped.
I like the end of words better than the head of words because the "butt" is where all the action is…
 
CONSIDER
 
1. Regular plurals (book - bookS / sandwich - sandwichES
2. Possessives (genitive) the book of Mary - Mary'S book.
3. Contractions - can'T / might'VE
4. Past tense changes - walk / walkED
5. Dates and numbers - 21ST of July / the sixteenTH ice cream.
6. Adverbs - swift / swiftLY
7. Gerunds - jump / jumpING
8. And the most important item on the list… Punctuation marks!!!!





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