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security auditing software


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#1 frogbreath

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 11:08 AM

Does Linux have a security auditing tool you can run on a Linux desk top that would flag anything set up wrong and tell you how to change it to be more secure or does this not exist. The more simple the better I think windows had a few when I used windows.



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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 02:22 PM

There isnt any real need for this, Linux in general is far more secure and more safe than any windows environment.

Sure linux isnt bulletproof, no OS really is but keep to these rules in mind and you will be fine:

 

Dont download any unknown packages and or executables, if you really need a application that isnt found in the repositories then usually PPA's (personal package archives)  are safe to use in general.

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Keep updated

And make sure to have a backup.

 

Linux is normally very easy to keep free from malicious software, usually security issues on linux are from people using root accounts.

Just keep in mind where things are at and everything will be fine.


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#3 mremski

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 03:55 PM

OP, what are you worried about, specifically? 

 

Services that have open listening ports that may be compromisable?  Run netstat -aln to get a list of the listening sockets and look up their port numbers.  Couple that with output of lsof and you can figure out executables/processes are controlling those sockets.  Then you see if you actually need them open, if not you stop them.  Eg:  you are not running a web service, so if there is an httpd process listening on ports 80 or 443, kill it, don't start it.

 

Listening sockets are going to be the primary or one of the primary ways to attack the host remotely.  If you are behind a firewall of some sort, say a Linksys wrt54g behind a cable modem, the default is "deny all incoming from the WAN unless it is a response to an outbound LAN request".  If you don't have any port forwarding, from WAN to a LAN service, don't worry.

 

If you are concerned with "downloading an email attachment under Linux and forwarding it to a Windows user", not much to help with there.  There are probably things that could scan the attachment, but still only as good as the latest definitions.

 

Downloading bad updates?  Threat it like Windows:  "check for but do NOT download and install".  Then if something is a security update, download and install it, otherwise, think about it 3 times.  Security updates, you should only apply the ones "applicable" to you ( if you are not running httpd server who cares about a CVE for it).

 

Above is all my opinion based on running *nix systems as a desktop for a long time.  Others may have different opinions (good):  it's up to you to take in all the information and make your own decision.  You are responsible for your security on your resources. 

I'll gladly answer any reasonable questions.


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#4 frogbreath

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 03:34 AM

Not worried about anything specifically I am just curious about security auditing software for Linux and if any simple solutions exist.

I'm not to long ago started to use Linux so thought prudent to learn about securing Linux as best I can as a novice computer user.

I used to have a security auditing tool on my windows computer, don't recall the name which is why I wanted to know if one exists for Linux. I know Linux isn't windows I am just curious about similar tools. 

I don't really understand the netstat stuff ran it anyway and so much comes up it's all Chinese to me I am afraid I will have a look at netstat once I learn the basics of Linux.

Thanks for your information it's all helpful and I'm sure will come in helpful.






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