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Pros and cons of one OS/vendor?


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#1 Occasional

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 08:10 PM

Seeking opinion on stratagy of staying 100% Microsoft (or any other one vendor), as much as possible.  

 

Question is, if you have MS OS, use Gmail and Firefox, Google, iTunes, and AWS cloud - even if you think each is better than MS options - does that open more vulnerablities than staying Windows, Hotmail and Edge, Bing, Azure, Windows Store, etc....? 

 

A lot of concern over government data collection; but corporations might be bigger concern, and less accountable.  

 

Better to have your data in a few hands, or many?  

 

Worth creating a poll?  Suggestions on wording? 

 

 



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#2 Just_One_Question

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 08:19 PM

Never thought about it this way - I guess, I'd go with better in fewer hands than in many.:)



#3 Pimptech

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 09:37 PM

Seeking opinion on stratagy of staying 100% Microsoft (or any other one vendor), as much as possible.  

 

Question is, if you have MS OS, use Gmail and Firefox, Google, iTunes, and AWS cloud - even if you think each is better than MS options - does that open more vulnerablities than staying Windows, Hotmail and Edge, Bing, Azure, Windows Store, etc....? 

 

A lot of concern over government data collection; but corporations might be bigger concern, and less accountable.  

 

Better to have your data in a few hands, or many?  

 

Worth creating a poll?  Suggestions on wording? 

 

 

 

Hey!

 

Well, I think that is the same. I don't know how is the servers structure of each VENDOR if they share server or doesn't. If they does, then one vulnerability in one could open the doors to all of them, isn't ?

All depends of the service used. I think the services of each vendors differs a lot from each other. Microsoft spend a lot of money on Windows, because it's one of the more used products of them. In other hand Edge it's not safe at all. 

Google pays a huge amount of cash for who bring to them vulnerability in Chrome. Is an active developing team. 

 

Like a said for me differs from service to service.

 

Regards.



#4 Occasional

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 10:01 PM

Thanks for thoughts, so far.
 
Question expands as you consider the subject.  Internet added vastly more complications; but related questions since first PCs. 
 
No one company covers all the bases: devices, OS, applications, connectivity -< ISPs and hosting, mobile -< Wi-Fi and cellular.... Even if one did, companies come and go, bought and sold, merged and broken up.  No guaranty on who will hold your data tomorrow. 
 
Like trying to herd cats - but question remains: does limiting vendor/provider help?


#5 Tr4ce

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 03:17 PM

This is a really good question. 

 

They will always collect our data, that's why we must be mindful of what we put out digitally. Using encryption to keep your files private...as best you can and using's a good VPN and email service is all we really can do. There gunna collect no matter what so lets just hope they will have to much data and its just white noise. 

 

I think people will need to start looking at different services and stop handing there data over to the the big wigs.- notices there all American companies :P 

 

Linux OS have come so far in ten years - and the application are slowly getting there. If Linux can get better application support I think it could be a OS for everyone. 



#6 Occasional

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 04:48 PM

With so much, even operating systems, being moved to the "as a service" model, a factor to consider is jurisdiction. 

 

That raises a number of concerns, especially security/privacy compliance issues. With some vendor/service suppliers, you can select physical location of cloud data centers (ex. only US or North America).  

 

A related issue is Terms of Service.  Bad enough trying to get through one set of TOS for a single vendor; how can you even know if those of multiple vendors are contradictory?  

 

Then there's the update issue.  Security is evermore dependent on near constant updates (OS, browser, applications and apps, smart-whatevers, router firmware...). 

 

That gets back to the question: What's better, cherry picking the best components from multiple vendors, or the "simplicity" of a single (or at least fewer), source? 



#7 Just_One_Question

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 05:28 PM

It's a personal choice in the end. I prefer the more simplistic approach of the closed system for the exact reasons that you pointed out. Many people, however, opt for diversifying, whereas I favor concentrating all my security-related thoughts on a single specific thing. I'm all in, whereas some people prefer having the best of everything security-wise.:)



#8 Occasional

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 08:46 PM

On downside (to one vendor option), they can kill a technology or feature, or deprecate or remove support at will.  

 

Some of Microsoft's actions, along these lines have left people out-to-dry.  They killed Silverlight (to make Apple happy).  Dropped their Expression Studio tools.  Bought Visio (which had bought fact-based-modeling toolset for ORM), then cut loose the ORM tool (and the VP for DB tech who developed it).  Lot's more to add to that list - but sure other large vendors have done the same. 

 

Any vendor can chose not to support some OS or other component from another vendor; or drop support, forcing you to scramble for a replacement.  

 

No smooth ride, either way. 



#9 Just_One_Question

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 08:53 PM

Yes, but as I said it's pretty individual, as I don't use any of the things that you've listed and usually the only downside that I would have if I were to just stick with the Microsoft Eco-system, would be that I don't like the Edge browser the way I do Chrome or Firefox. It is somewhat easy for me to just move on if Microsoft becomes irritating. If we were talking about big firms, using all types of software, it would probably make more sense to stick to the 2nd route of employing the best products, no matter from whom, even if it means having to go through 100 different ToS papers. :)


Edited by Just_One_Question, 26 July 2017 - 08:54 PM.


#10 Occasional

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 10:59 AM

Thanks again for input.

 

Still would like suggestions on structuring poll/survey.  

 

I think the main questions is: "Have you considered pros and cons of limiting number of vendors/suppliers?".

 

Not too happy with "vendor/supplier" wording - suggestions on better term? 



#11 Just_One_Question

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 11:11 AM

Well, I'm not too sure neither how to make a poll (I think there's an option somewhere when you start a new topic), nor how to properly word the issue. If it were me, I would probably ask: "Computer privacy: Do you prefer staying in a single company's eco-system, so as not to provide your information to too many corporations?", but English isn't my native language, so I am really not the person to give advice on that.



#12 rp88

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 05:10 PM

There might be a privacy argument for staying with one company, but in many cases other techniques (as just a few examples: encrypting files locally into archive folders before uploading to backup clouds, cookie clearing, adobe flash blocking, VPNs, keeping well away from having IoT devices in your home/office ...) will give a greater improvement to privacy than sticking with one company will (as one company might still sell to many users of data). You might even argue that sticking with ne company for everything lets them get a full pucture while working across several for different things lets each only see a single side of your life, I'd like to see proper quantitative arguments over whether this or having everything with one company is better but doubt the necessary info can be easily found to make a determination either way.

Aside from privacy though, sticking with one company can make things more severe if something goes wrong, if you're with multiple independent companies for different products then if one of the companies closes down, or has some sevre tempoaray problems with their services, atleast not everything you're trying to use will be affected.

My personal advice would be to use whichever things you need (for example: some programs you may need to run might well force your choice of OS, you might have to use a certain browser if you want to use certain features and compatibilities...) but where possible pick open source products when you can. They won't be harvesting your data to sell, or harvesting it for governments either. They'll be aware sooner and patch quicker when a software vulnerability is found. If they make interface changes which are unpopular the old version will often stick around, it might even be forked into a new arm of development and continue being security/bugfix updated in parallel to the newer version. They'll be free as in beer, as well as free as in speech. If you do come across a bug that is new and undocumented they'll probably be more interested in hearing about it and fixing it for the next version than a lot of commercial products.

Edited by rp88, 31 July 2017 - 05:10 PM.

Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB




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