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Computer Won't POST After Move


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#1 HardTimesHardware

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 08:23 AM

My computer is a home-built ATX tower.

 

I moved to a new apartment; once I got to the new apartment, I plugged the tower in and all the peripherals. The lights on the USB mouse and keyboard were flashing on and off in a manner that I would describe as "pulsing." When I tried to press the power button on the tower, it would not turn on, nor would the PSU fan spin up.

 

Things I've already tried:

 

- Plugging the tower into different outlets.

- Removing all PSU connections and plugging them back in again. (24-pin to motherboard, CPU power, GFX card, and all hard drives/ssd.)

- Removing & replacing the CMOS battery and clearing the CMOS.

- Checking under the motherboard for a wayward screw or something else that might be shorting it. (There was nothing of interest.)

- Checking to ensure that the tower's power button was connected to the motherboard properly. (It was.)

 

At this point, I'm stumped. I guess the PSU could have gone bad but it's one strange coincidence that it would have happened at the same time I moved. I had noticed no PSU problems before this.


Edited by HardTimesHardware, 25 July 2017 - 08:25 AM.


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 08:29 AM

Have you tried a powercycle? Remove the power plug, hold the power button down for 30 seconds. Replace your plug and boot. Sometimes draining the residual power of the MB helps. Some other things to try,

 

If you have a multimeter test the PSU

Remove all but one RAM stick. Try booting. If it fails switch slots. Then use another stick and do the same thing, switch slots between boot attempts.



#3 RolandJS

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 12:07 PM

Also, have you already tried powering up only the desktop?  Then powering up desktop with just the keyboard and mouse?


Edited by RolandJS, 25 July 2017 - 12:18 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

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#4 HardTimesHardware

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 12:21 PM

Thank you for your responses!

 

Have you tried a powercycle? Remove the power plug, hold the power button down for 30 seconds. Replace your plug and boot. Sometimes draining the residual power of the MB helps. Some other things to try,

 

If you have a multimeter test the PSU

Remove all but one RAM stick. Try booting. If it fails switch slots. Then use another stick and do the same thing, switch slots between boot attempts.

 

Unfortunately, I don't have a multimeter but I did try the RAM stick advice you suggested and it didn't seem to resolve the issue.

 

Also, have you already tried powering up only the desktop?  Then powering up desktop with just the keyboard and mouse?

 

Yes, I've tried booting it up with a number of different configurations. I've tried it with disconnecting everything but the motherboard and CPU connections, for example. (GPU removed and disconnected, no hard drives/SSD, etc.) I've also tried it with everything but the peripherals. Same kind of effect.

 

I don't discount that it might be a bad PSU, but the timing seems interesting. Maybe more likely something got jostled around but I'm not sure what.



#5 Kilroy

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 01:22 PM

I'd suggest reseating the RAM and any cards that are installed.  Just pull them out and put them right back in.



#6 jonuk76

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 05:51 PM

I plugged the tower in and all the peripherals. The lights on the USB mouse and keyboard were flashing on and off in a manner that I would describe as "pulsing." When I tried to press the power button on the tower, it would not turn on, nor would the PSU fan spin up.

 

 

Does the keyboard and mouse normally light up when the PC is powered off but plugged in? Just asking as some motherboards have "always on" USB ports which provide power when the system is switched off.


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#7 RolandJS

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 08:34 PM

Don't know about your desktop, however, there are many computers that have their network card always on, have their motherboards always on -- plugged in even though such are soft-powered off, that is how those computers can made awake by either a certain mouse button & movement, or by a certain set of keyboard strokes, or by a Wake-Up on Lan command from an external source.


Edited by RolandJS, 25 July 2017 - 08:35 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#8 malwaredpc

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 09:50 PM

Check the cable connector that go from your case to your motherboard and check the connectors that go from your PSU to your motherboard. Also, does it make any sound? Any beep? Take off the RAM modules and the GPU and put it again.



#9 MeepsterNotchy

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 10:57 PM

Try taking the ram to see if it responds with beeps. Also reseat CPU, it's worked before for me.



#10 HardTimesHardware

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 07:06 AM

Hi everyone, I have an update on some things I've tried.

I tried the old "testing your PSU with a paper clip" trick. (Jumping pins 15 and 16 with a paperclip to trick the PSU into turning on.) The PSU did power on.

I had a replacement motherboard I bought last year but never installed, so I figured now might be the time to do it. I took everything out and installed this new motherboard. (And of course, by necessity, reseating the RAM, CPU, and GPU.)

Nevertheless, no power on.

I made sure the power button was connected to the motherboard and even jumped the power button pins as to rule out the possibility of a bad power button. No result.

All power connections to the motherboard are nice and snug.

I've also tested each RAM stick individually.

Any thoughts or theories?

#11 RolandJS

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 09:51 AM

The only other wild idea of mine is to try that collection of internal and external parts in other computers, however, that is very impractical if one doesn't have a computer fix it shop with computers all over the place.


Edited by RolandJS, 29 July 2017 - 09:52 AM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#12 malwaredpc

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 11:22 AM

The problem is either the microprocessor or your case. You need to try this on other computer or buy one of them,



#13 jonuk76

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 09:59 AM

Hi everyone, I have an update on some things I've tried.

Any thoughts or theories?

 

Well you've ruled out the motherboard by replacing it, which is one major possibility.  My theory then is that the "pulsing" of keyboard lights you describe IMO suggests a PSU failure, in that instead of providing a stable voltage, it's fluctuating.

 

That doesn't negate the possibility of something else being wrong too, but in my experience a board will at least power up to the stage where fans are running even when the memory or CPU is not recognised.


7sbvuf-6.png


#14 JohnC_21

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 10:14 AM

Just a wild theory but take the computer to another location and see if it powers on. By other location I mean outside of your apartment. If you are using a power strip plug the computer directly into the electrical outlet.






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