Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Windows 10 only slightly more popular than Windows XP among firms


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 22,638 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:02 AM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 07:36 PM

Microsoft's aged Windows XP operating system is almost as widely used within businesses as Windows 10, according to a new survey.
 
Despite Windows XP being 16-years-old and, in general, no longer patched against hacks, XP is still being used on 11% of laptops and desktops, compared to 13% running Windows 10, the Spiceworks survey found.
 
"Despite the gains in Windows 10 penetration, the absolute share of computers running the OS remains relatively low," writes Peter Tsai, senior technology analyst at Spiceworks, of the data it gathered from hundreds of thousands of IT professionals.
 
Both Windows 10 and XP are a long way behind Windows 7, running on 68% of PCs. However, Windows 10 is now the second most used OS, according to the Spiceworks figures, and its overall share has improved since March this year, when it was only running on nine percent of machines.
 
Microsoft says there are more than 50 million business users of Windows 10, and recently highlighted that all 400,000 staff within Accenture, a global consulting company and Microsoft partner, are switching to the OS.
 
A poll earlier this year, found 52% of firms were still running Windows XP on at least one machine. However, Spiceworks' latest figures showed overall use of XP is diminishing, with the OS installed on some 11% of PCs, down from 14% in March.

 

 

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-only-slightly-more-popular-than-windows-xp-among-firms/



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Just_One_Question

Just_One_Question

  • Members
  • 1,400 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bulgaria
  • Local time:10:02 AM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 07:48 PM

aeeab2b67c4ae2bd6b2288b1addf0a7f.jpg

No kidding, Windows XP is a legendary product...

 

I personally rank the 4 best Windows OS versions, each respective for its time, like this:

 

1.Windows 7

2.Windows XP

3.Windows 98

4.Windows 10

 

I expect, though, Windows 10, if Microsoft keeps this whole 'as-a-service' theme rolling, to become pretty good in the future and then I'll put it in 3rd place.:)


Edited by Just_One_Question, 24 July 2017 - 07:49 PM.


#3 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 6,870 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:03:02 AM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 07:50 PM

Actually, this is no surprise to me.

 

Some of the most recalcitrant technicians I have ever known are those who work in large business or governmental settings.  They take the approach that once something is in place the justification necessary to supplant it is such that it can virtually never be made.  I worked in a state agency where we were still running XP several years after Windows 7 made its debut and "the IT powers that were" had dug in their heels and were insisting that Windows 7 was too big a risk.

 

Er, no.  The same is true for Windows 10, though these types are having their heads explode with Windows as a Service because, ultimately, they must "go with the flow" just like the rest of us do.

 

P.S. to JOQ:  Anyone who can say, seriously, at this point in time that Windows XP "ain't broke" just ain't payin' attention.


Edited by britechguy, 24 July 2017 - 07:52 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#4 Just_One_Question

Just_One_Question

  • Members
  • 1,400 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bulgaria
  • Local time:10:02 AM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 08:05 PM

I agree, but I don't know exactly what they mean by 'among firms' to be using Windows XP. With its extended support for business, Windows XP is probably still plenty good for small shops and such. I mean, are those things even connected to the Internet? There's a pretty big furniture store in my city right now and I saw that their system was still using Windows XP, but I don't think the cables exiting the computers were Ethernet or anything of the sorts. Pretty sure it was a closed system that had nothing to do with the Internet - just to systematize their inventory, that's all. In those cases I mean that Windows XP is probably still worth the last couple of months/years squeeze. After that - new computers and Windows 10... until Windows 20 comes out.:lmao:



#5 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 6,870 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:03:02 AM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 08:28 PM

I am having one of those, "Where in the hell did I see (and respond to) . . .!!" moments.

 

I could swear that John posted another article or website about market share of the most common OSes, and I could swear it was just yesterday, that contradicts this article.  But I cannot find it right now to save my life.  Windows 10 was already at 26% (or very near) of the market.  Residual XP was nowhere near to that and I would expect that there would millions more home hangers-on than businesses.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#6 Just_One_Question

Just_One_Question

  • Members
  • 1,400 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bulgaria
  • Local time:10:02 AM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 08:39 PM

Yes, it put Windows XP at less than 7% of global market share among desktop PCs running Windows, if I remember correctly. However, as far as my understanding goes, this current article is discussing solely businesses' PCs. Among firms' desktop computers and among those that have Windows, Windows 10 is slightly more, but ever-increasing, popular as compared to Windows XP, which still has ~11%. :)


Edited by Just_One_Question, 24 July 2017 - 08:39 PM.


#7 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 6,870 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:03:02 AM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 08:50 PM

Well, I still question this article just based on my own anecdotal experience.   I haven't seen an XP machine in a commercial setting in years now.   Windows 7 quite literally "took over the world," and not just in business, not all that long after it was introduced.

 

I want to know where and how they gathered their data.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#8 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer


  • Members
  • 6,230 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:05:02 PM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 09:12 PM

I've got a heavily mixed and hybridized network here, we still even have the odd Win2000 machine running as well as a bunch of XP machines. (all are isolated from the internet of course)

 

That said, all of our administration machines are either Windows 7 or Ubuntu, except one. That one lonely piece of junk Win 10 notebook that proves itself again and again to be unreliable and unstable.

 

Microsoft isn't small, stable or experienced enough to run a rolling release. Sysadmins don't want to be changing their OS's all the time either, they want stable and secure desktops, not more features all the bloody time which keep them bug hunting when they'd much rather be working towards automating their systems.

 

MS only has themselves in mind with this digital abortion, customer satisfaction is irrelevant. Nadella has ruined it for us all.

 

As a company we'll be dragged kicking and screaming into Win10, many of our desktops will never make it there and will be replaced by Apple and Linux systems as we cannot trust Windows 10 in a critical environment.



#9 JohnC_21

JohnC_21
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 22,638 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:02 AM

Posted 25 July 2017 - 07:04 AM

Looking at the rollout schedule for current branches for business I don't see how a business with say 5000 seats has enough time to test each current branch before the next one rolls out. It looks like they would have less than 18 months to fully test out there hardware and software before the next current branch arrives.



#10 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer


  • Members
  • 6,230 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:05:02 PM

Posted 25 July 2017 - 04:08 PM

There is the Enterprise LTSB branches JohnC. They have a 10 year life cycle...

 

Microsoft never publishes feature updates through Windows Update on devices that run Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB. Instead, it typically offers new LTSB releases every 2–3 years, and organizations can choose to install them as in-place upgrades or even skip releases over a 10-year life cycle.

Somehow Microsoft thinks that all the desktop junk that sysadmins don't want is critical to the workplace

 

LTSB is available only in the Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB edition. This build of Windows doesn’t contain many in-box applications, such as Microsoft Edge, Windows Store client, Cortana (limited search capabilities remain available), Microsoft Mail, Calendar, OneNote, Weather, News, Sports, Money, Photos, Camera, Music, and Clock. Therefore, it’s important to remember that Microsoft has positioned the LTSB model primarily for specialized devices. Since Windows Store client is not available in Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB, if you need to run a Windows Store app, you should not use Windows 10 LTSB on that device.

 

LTSB is not intended for deployment on most or all the PCs in an organization; it should be used only for special-purpose devices. As a general guideline, a PC with Microsoft Office installed is a general-purpose device, typically used by an information worker, and therefore it is better suited for the CB or CBB servicing branch.

 

Still, MS are applying caveats and making the product ridiculously expensive to try and prevent companies from using it primarily.  It looks like the perfect product for business though. But it really isn't very stable. Not yet anyway.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users