Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

acomdata driver


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 platypus2_0

platypus2_0

  • Members
  • 10 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 23 July 2017 - 09:36 PM

So I have an acomdata external hard drive that I have not plugged in to a computer for at least 6 or 7 years. When I plug it in to my pc it says the driver is out of date, where can I find the download for this driver? thanks



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Just_One_Question

Just_One_Question

  • Members
  • 1,400 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bulgaria
  • Local time:02:10 AM

Posted 23 July 2017 - 09:44 PM

The official web-site seems to be no longer supporting such products and on CNET the newest drivers are from 2004. I'd post the make and model of the external hard drive in google, along with the word Driver, and check if anything comes up from the past year or before that. Also, what OS are you using? Windows XP?:)



#3 platypus2_0

platypus2_0
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 10 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 23 July 2017 - 10:28 PM

the model number is not on the drive is there any other way to find it? I am running windows 7 pro



#4 Platypus

Platypus

  • Global Moderator
  • 15,478 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:10:10 AM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 01:48 AM

A drive that is so non-standard that it uses a unique driver can present problems, however if a notice simply says a driver is "out of date", that's a little odd. A driver does not become outdated simply with the passage of time.

Is this a USB drive? Has it ever been connected to that particular computer before in order for it already have a driver loaded?
Top 5 things that never get done:

1.

#5 platypus2_0

platypus2_0
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 10 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 10:41 AM

It is a USB drive and the computer that it was previously connected to was a Mac which I read can be more difficult to use when trying to solve a problem like this, (the mac does nothing when I plug the drive in to it)

#6 Platypus

Platypus

  • Global Moderator
  • 15,478 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:10:10 AM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 11:04 AM

If it's USB, then by rights no further driver should be required. Reading other people's travails on other forums, it might be simplest if the drive contents are important, to remove the hard drive and try it in a drive adapter or alternative external enclosure, or connected internally to a desktop system. You'd need to find out if it's old enough to be an IDE drive within the enclosure, or SATA.

 

If it does nothing at all on a Mac that it worked with in the past, that's not an encouraging sign.


Top 5 things that never get done:

1.

#7 platypus2_0

platypus2_0
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 10 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 24 July 2017 - 09:32 PM

so one thing that I am wondering is do data recovery companies just take the drive out of the enclosure, put it in a different one and maybe use some software to get the information? Or do they have the ability to take the disc inside the hard drive out and read that from another piece of special equipment? 

thanks 



#8 Platypus

Platypus

  • Global Moderator
  • 15,478 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:10:10 AM

Posted 25 July 2017 - 03:15 AM

The user or a regular computer repair shop can in almost all cases re-fit the hard drive into another enclosure or adapter and see if the drive itself is working normally and can be accessed. If it then operates 100%, it was the interface in the original enclosure that was faulty.

 

If the drive then becomes accessible, but, possibly due to what happened when the interface failed, the drive is corrupted to some degree, it's still possible that owner or a computer repairer may be able to use recovery software and get access to the drive contents. Some quite good recovery software is available free, and some very good software can be purchased, available to anyone.

 

If the drive remains stubbornly inaccessible, or its contents cannot be recovered using readily available software, drive recovery specialists use various techniques to attempt to recover data, depending on what is actually wrong with the drive, and how much the owner is willing to spend. Sometimes a repair or part substitution is required, if the drive's circuitry is faulty, a head has failed or similar. If the problem is data corruption, it may be that being able to access the drive at a low level with custom developed software and knowledge of individual manufacturers control routines lets the corruption be repaired, or important data be recovered.

 

If the electromechanical operation of the drive is beyond being restored, and the data is very valuable, the platter(s) may be able to be removed and either refitted and re-aligned in a donor chassis if they have the exact one required, or examined using a magnetic microscope to reconstruct the data. These procedures need a high level of technical skill and access to clean room conditions, so are very expensive.

 

Some faults simply cannot be recovered from, such as severe damage to the platter surface from bad head crashes, or deterioration and disintegration of the magnetic recording layer, such as happened with the IBM "Deathstars" (DeskStar).


Top 5 things that never get done:

1.

#9 platypus2_0

platypus2_0
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 10 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 25 July 2017 - 08:10 PM

So I just took the hard drive out of the enclosure and found some interesting things. 

1. it makes a very very faint buzzing noise 

2. it is actually sheep in wools clothing!!! It is a wd drive in the acomdata enclosure. SN WCAPW3293076 

So what could the faint buzzing noise mean?

And what do I do from here, I am currently researching the sn.

 thanks



#10 platypus2_0

platypus2_0
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 10 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 25 July 2017 - 08:46 PM

since I am not hearing a whirling noise but this other noise(coming from the side where the spindle sits), does that mean that the spindle or motor could be bad(and hopefully replaced by a drive recovery center)



#11 Platypus

Platypus

  • Global Moderator
  • 15,478 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:10:10 AM

Posted 26 July 2017 - 02:50 AM

A Serial Number doesn't tell us what the drive is, only a Model Number or Part Number will. There are only a few drive manufacturers to choose from, so finding a WD drive isn't surprising.
Top 5 things that never get done:

1.

#12 platypus2_0

platypus2_0
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 10 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 26 July 2017 - 06:58 AM

So now what happens?
 

Attached Files


Edited by hamluis, 28 July 2017 - 11:06 AM.


#13 Platypus

Platypus

  • Global Moderator
  • 15,478 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:10:10 AM

Posted 26 July 2017 - 07:24 AM

A WD5000AAKS is quite a respectable drive, 500GB Caviar Blue. When you say you took it out of the enclosure, do you mean you've examined it but it is still connected into the enclosure interface and being powered from the enclosure's PSU? If it doesn't run, that still allows for the possibility of a fault in either the enclosure's PSU or the interface in the enclosure.

If you have connected it to the SATA and power connections in a computer, if there's no indication of it spinning up, then yes, the spin motor could have seized with the length of time it's been unused. That would need service attention from the likes of a recovery center, unless you wanted to try a "flick" technique of trying to spin the platter, with the attendant risk of doing some damage.
Top 5 things that never get done:

1.

#14 platypus2_0

platypus2_0
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 10 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 26 July 2017 - 07:43 AM

So I just examined it in the enclosure, can I just plug it in to any other enclosures or tower that has the same connection points?

#15 Platypus

Platypus

  • Global Moderator
  • 15,478 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:10:10 AM

Posted 26 July 2017 - 08:04 AM

Yes, it's a standard drive, you can transfer it into another SATA enclosure or adapter, or connect it into a desktop computer as a secondary drive, like you would any other SATA drive. If it is installed into a desktop system, it might be necessary to make sure the boot order stays correct so that the system doesn't try to boot from this drive.

There's some possible risk if the spin bearing has seized, that if the drive is left trying to start for much time, the spin motor could also burn out. That might be more likely to happen when it's being powered from the internal PSU in a desktop casing, which can supply a lot more current than an enclosure could. If you're sure the drive isn't spinning, I wouldn't leave it powered up for more than a few seconds at a time.

Edited by Platypus, 26 July 2017 - 08:06 AM.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users