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Linux Mint 17.2


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#16 sikntired

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 07:47 AM

Gary R said: "The OP here is clearly new to Linux, and as such, may find the sheer volume of new Linux releases to be intimidating. What I was suggesting, was that there was no need for him to feel pressured to move away from Mint 17.2 just because it's been superseded by newer versions, and that if he's looking for stability whilst he learns more about Linux, then for the time being he's fine staying where he is"

 

You are exactly right. This is why I posed the question to those of you who have been around the "Linux block". I value your input and advice as related from your experiences. That is what I think is phenomenal about this forum..............the willingness of the experienced to assist those of us who are trying to find our way.

 

Healthy discourse is of great value in any forum.



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#17 The-Toolman

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 08:02 AM

Hey Gary R,

 

You express yourself very well.

 

Yes and most of my computers are pretty much standard Intel hardware which for the most part works OOTB.

 

I guess I'm as guilty as the rest of us who have forgotten that it is intimidating to come from a Windows environment where a user has been comfortable for a time and then plunge into the new world of Linux.

 

 

The Toolman :wink:


Edited by The-Toolman, 23 July 2017 - 10:27 AM.

I'm grumpy because I can be not because I'm old.

 

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#18 Al1000

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 04:22 PM

As GaryR stated : "Mint 17.2 is supported till 2019"


Yes, but that doesn't make any difference to you, because you are booting from the ISO. The advantage of a supported operating system is that it can be updated, when it is installed or run live with persistence.

However when you are using the ISO without persistence, like you are, it cannot be updated.

#19 sikntired

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 05:16 PM

 

As GaryR stated : "Mint 17.2 is supported till 2019"


Yes, but that doesn't make any difference to you, because you are booting from the ISO. The advantage of a supported operating system is that it can be updated, when it is installed or run live with persistence.

However when you are using the ISO without persistence, like you are, it cannot be updated.

 

 Yes Al1000 I am fully aware. However when I decide that the time has come to install Linux along side of Windows 7 it is comforting to know that it will be supported till 2019. This, I think, should give me ample time to navigate Linux and with the help of members here feel less and less reliant on Windows, subsequently "ditching Windows" after the current end of life/support which is my goal going forward.



#20 Gary R

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 12:26 AM

If you want to run Mint without actually "installing" it as a dual-boot, you might try running it in a VM.

 

http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/2014/05/how-to-install-linux-mint-as-virtual.html

 

That way you can experiment with a number of different versions, without making any material changes to your Windows machine. Copies of Linux run inside a VM can be updated, and used just as if you actually had a version of Linux installed on your machine.

 

IMO, they give a more realistic Linux experience than running from a live cd/usb.



#21 Al1000

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 06:20 AM

Yes Al1000 I am fully aware. However when I decide that the time has come to install Linux along side of Windows 7 it is comforting to know that it will be supported till 2019. This, I think, should give me ample time to navigate Linux and with the help of members here feel less and less reliant on Windows, subsequently "ditching Windows" after the current end of life/support which is my goal going forward.


Absolutely. If, in the future, you decide to install Linux Mint, any supported Mint operating system would do.

My post was in response to your OP, and so only addressed your current situation.

#22 sikntired

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 07:07 AM

@Gary R said: "If you want to run Mint without actually "installing" it as a dual-boot, you might try running it in a VM."

 

That's a great idea ! Never thought of that and did not even consider this as a viable option with Linux. I'm definitely going to try that.

 

Thanks for the link and your input and to the other members who took their time to respond. It is appreciated.



#23 sikntired

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 07:19 AM

 

Yes Al1000 I am fully aware. However when I decide that the time has come to install Linux along side of Windows 7 it is comforting to know that it will be supported till 2019. This, I think, should give me ample time to navigate Linux and with the help of members here feel less and less reliant on Windows, subsequently "ditching Windows" after the current end of life/support which is my goal going forward.


Absolutely. If, in the future, you decide to install Linux Mint, any supported Mint operating system would do.

My post was in response to your OP, and so only addressed your current situation.

 

Yes Al1000 I understood and interpreted as such. I was just expanding on my thoughts.


Edited by sikntired, 24 July 2017 - 07:20 AM.


#24 Gary R

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 08:07 AM

Thanks for the link and your input and to the other members who took their time to respond. It is appreciated.

 

You're welcome.

 

I try out most of the distros I'm interested in on VM prior to installing them in a more permanent state.

 

The advantage (and also the disadvantage) of using this method is that it is hardware independent ....

 

  • Advantage .... pretty much most distros will run on VM, so you can play with the interface, and get used to the layout, and the way it updates and installs programs.
  • Disadvantage .... you don't get to find out whether the distros you like are compatible with your hardware


#25 sikntired

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 01:19 PM

 

Thanks for the link and your input and to the other members who took their time to respond. It is appreciated.

 

You're welcome.

 

I try out most of the distros I'm interested in on VM prior to installing them in a more permanent state.

 

The advantage (and also the disadvantage) of using this method is that it is hardware independent ....

 

  • Advantage .... pretty much most distros will run on VM, so you can play with the interface, and get used to the layout, and the way it updates and installs programs.
  • Disadvantage .... you don't get to find out whether the distros you like are compatible with your hardware

 

Well, that's okay. It still gives me the opportunity to "tinker around" and familiarize myself with distro(s). Thanks again!!



#26 Gary R

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 09:12 AM

Any time. :thumbup2:






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