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Windows Homegroup "Weirdness"


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#1 britechguy

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 05:05 PM

I will do the best I can to describe what's going on, but even I'm not exactly sure.

 

At one point one of my computers had been the creator of the homegroup on my network but I did not want that machine to be the "master" anymore.  So, I dissolved that home group and created another, which never seemed to work right anyway.

 

So, I decided I'd try to start from scratch.  This morning I withdrew the desktop from the homegroup, which went fine.  Now is where things get weird.  Both of my laptops, including the one I'm typing from, claim "You've been invited to join a Homegroup" and asking me to enter the password.  The only password I ever knew won't work and, to be honest, shouldn't since there should be no machine currently on the network that's "the master" for one.

 

Is there a way to determine where this "invitation" is coming from?   Ideally I'd like to do something to nuke "the invitation" so that I can truly start from scratch in creating a Homegroup in hopes that it could function as they're supposed to.

 

Any guidance greatly appreciated.

 

P.S.  I've run the troubleshooter and it is turning up nada.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#2 Just_One_Question

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 05:19 PM

Maybe this would be helpful?

 

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-networking/windows-10-cant-leave-invited-homegroup/80b17b1a-d405-44ec-8950-938c551a685c?page=1



#3 britechguy

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 09:13 PM

Thanks.  I'll give that a try when time allows.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#4 britechguy

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 05:00 PM

I did want to report back that the method in the answers.microsoft.com thread worked beautifully.

 

I'll add a couple of bits.  It is not absolutely necessary that all machines on your LAN be turned off, per se, but that they not be connected to the LAN when you're trying to delete the idstore.sset file from the machine that you want to use as the "master" for your homegroup.  You can just disable the WiFi or pull the ethernet cable on any of those machines if you don't wish to shut them down.

 

Also, presuming that C: is the drive on which Windows is installed and from which it runs, this two line batch file makes it very easy to delete the necessary file without any chance of fat fingering (and it will run under either Command Prompt [saved as a .bat] or PowerShell [saved as a .ps1], with admin privilege):

 

cd C:\Windows\ServiceProfiles\LocalService\AppData\Roaming\PeerNetworking
del idstore.sset

 

If you don't run it with admin privilege you can neither change into that directory nor delete the idstore.sset file that resides there.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#5 Just_One_Question

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 05:52 PM

I'm glad that it worked.:)






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