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Need help with USB network adapter


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9 replies to this topic

#1 FirstContact

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 03:51 PM

I own a Netgear WNDA3100v3 N600 USB Network adapter because the router is too damn far away for me to use an ethernet cable. Basically, this thing is fine for just browsing the web. But when I try to play games, the ping bleep destroys my ass. I'm talking jumps from 20-30ish to over 1000ms around once a minute-ish. Because of this I've been pretty much barred from playing any game at a level even close to competitive. I've spoken with Netgear support 3 times now. They're useless. First time the lady was supposed to call me back and didn't. Second time the guy got my email wrong (I told him to just send me the flowchart he was using), and the third time they finally got my email right and it was just some links to bleepty articles with vague troubleshooting steps that I'd already seen multiple times. So that's why I'm here. I can provide logs where I ping my router or the logs of various ping tests for proof if needed. I'd seriously prefer to not have to buy any new devices, so if there's any way to make this thing stop with the spikes, that would be preferable.
 
PS: I've tested the ping of multiple other devices on this network to see if it was on my ISPs end, and they were fine. No spikes.
 
Thanks in advance!


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#2 mikey11

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 05:13 PM

will the computer work fine if you DO use an ethernet cable?

 

in my experience those usb adapters are never very reliable and i avoid them at all costs,

 

if this is a desktop computer, your better off buying an internal wireless card



#3 FirstContact

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 05:20 PM

will the computer work fine if you DO use an ethernet cable?

 

in my experience those usb adapters are never very reliable and i avoid them at all costs,

 

if this is a desktop computer, your better off buying an internal wireless card

I've been using an ethernet cable for years prior. No issues. Only problem is I moved and now I would have to run the cable all throughout the house and down some stairs. So not really an option. I tried a network card first. Couldn't get it to work.

 

Had a technician come out and personally take a look at it and he was completely stumped. So I got on the phone with some higher-level tech support from the manufacturer and after over two hours of nothing working the guy just said "I have no idea, you want a full refund?". So after that I just decided to get a USB adapter because I was tired of the 2+ months with no internet.

 

I knew at the time that USB adapters weren't the best. But the degree of spikes that I'm seeing are so far beyond what I thought I would be getting. They're so extreme (1500+ms) and that's what led me to seek out solutions, because I'm thinking that there must be some other variable that is going wrong that is causing an issue this large.



#4 malwaredpc

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 03:19 PM

Wireless is not as reliable as wired.

 

If you want to solve this, you could choose an internal model with  two antennas (which may fail as a solution) or do a wired installation (a proper one).

 

The tech that went there is an idiot. You should charge him with time wasting charges and for impersonating a professional.



#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 04:08 PM

Consider a powerline network.

 

http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-powerline-networking-kit/



#6 malwaredpc

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 04:25 PM

It will depend on if the electrical installation has RCDs and if can be done without it depending on the norms of the country to be possibly to use it.



#7 britechguy

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 04:29 PM

 

That has worked well in other circumstances I'm familiar with that have parallels to the OP's.  Even though it involves buying new equipment it's worth considering.

 

For myself, I've had nothing but great luck with USB micro dongles for WiFi and they now come for all protocols including Wireless AC.   They're so inexpensive, see here, it's well worth giving another adapter a try.  I've never bothered with an external antenna, but varieties that sport one are there.


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#8 malwaredpc

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 05:48 PM

Well, some are coming with two antennas too.



#9 arlattimor

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 06:30 PM

This sounds as if you have your network in mixed mode, so that it would be backwards compatible with wifi standards 802.11N, 802.11G, 802.11B. Does your router have the ability to change from mixed mode to 802.11N only?


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#10 mightywiz

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 04:30 PM

yeah those things are crap especially if mounted in a desktop on the floor.

get an USB extension cable and mount it as high as you can.

 

this is from personal experience!

 

also you can purchase a range extender/repeater that will amplify your wifi signal to get a stronger signal

in your location.  I've used a belkin range extender and worked great.   most netgear routers have an option

for being a repeater so go check out your local thrift store and see if you can pick one up for about $15 bucks.






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