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What will be the optimal space to be kept free on a hard disc?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Hareen

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 11:19 PM

Hi all,

 

Let me ask a simple question.

 

What should be the space to be kept free on a Portable Hard disc to keep it safe and running optimal?

 

Also answer the same in the case of a desktop hard disc.

 

Why I am asking is I have got 6 external Hard discs viz

 

a 1 TB Seagate HDD externally powered,

a 1 TB Western Digital My Passport USB Powered,

a 2 TB Western Digital My Passport USB Powered,

a 2 TB Western Digital Elements USB Powered,

a Seagate 2TB Backup Plus Slim USB Powered,

a 500 GB hard disc cased out of my old laptop hard disc USB Powered.

 

I was wondering how much Gigs should I leave free in each HDD mandatorily for optimal performance.

 

I am leaving a minimum 20% space in my desktop drives at all times (it should be at least 15% as per defragmentation tools).

 

The question is how much for my portable drives. Will it be same as desktop internal drives or should it be bit higher or bit lower?

 

Thank you everyone in advance for the inputs you provide.



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#2 jwoods301

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 11:22 PM

Those numbers are from "back in the day" when drive capacity was much smaller...

 

In modern Windows, defragmentation is really not much of an issue anymore either.

 

I would run Disk Cleanup on a regular basis, and download and run WirDirStat to see which files and folders are using the most space.

 

It's a waste of resources to scan junk for viruses and malware...and a waste of disk space to reserve 15 to 20% of a TB+ drive as free.

 


Edited by jwoods301, 17 July 2017 - 11:26 PM.


#3 Hareen

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 11:24 PM

So you mean I can fill them to the brim.

 

I don't think that would be nice for the little ones' health.

 

There is some data I cannot risk losing. I have got multiple copies of them though!


Edited by Hareen, 17 July 2017 - 11:25 PM.


#4 jwoods301

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 11:28 PM

So you mean I can fill them to the brim.

 

I don't think that would be nice for the little ones' health.

 

There is some data I cannot risk losing. I have got multiple copies of them though!

Re-read my post.

 

That's why you make multiple copies...

 

You also need to test those backups, to make sure they work.


Edited by jwoods301, 17 July 2017 - 11:29 PM.


#5 hamluis

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 01:08 PM

The simple answer is...the hard drive with Windows installed on it...is the only drive where anyone must consider free space.  All other drives can literally filled to the brim with data files or programs...with no impact at all.

 

For a hard drive on which Windows is installed, the suggested minimum amount of free space is 15%.  I would say this applies to any partition on which Windows is installed...and which is no larger than 200 GB. 

 

On a drive which is larger than 500 GB, having 15% free space makes no sense, IMO.  So I reduce the free space required to what I believe a clean install would take up spacewise...leaving free space on the Windows partition at about 50GB.  This is debatable but it makes sense to me.

 

Louis



#6 malwaredpc

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 07:23 PM

It doesn't matter except for fragmentation.... but will you be using them as internal drives? It makes no sense, so the optimal ammount is equal to whatever.

 

The only case it would make any sense is to move files from one hard drive to another and you need space for that (to make order for example). Instead of using a temporarily third drive, you can make use of the extra space to help you not to need another drive.



#7 Hareen

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 10:12 PM

Oh is it!!

 

Thanks everyone for their inputs.

 

But to play it safe I will not fill my Hard discs to their brim leaving a 10% free space per disc.



#8 malwaredpc

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Posted 19 July 2017 - 04:55 AM

Oh is it!!

 

Thanks everyone for their inputs.

 

But to play it safe I will not fill my Hard discs to their brim leaving a 10% free space per disc.

I forgot to mention, you also may want to have a little free space for uncompress files there too.



#9 britechguy

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Posted 19 July 2017 - 08:35 AM

It's already been said, but I'll say it again:  There is nothing to be gained by leaving any free space on a drive used strictly as a storage vault (which means it's not the internal drive with the OS on it).

 

If you need a bit of free space for doing things like uncompressing then you are leaving the space for that purpose, but if you uncompress something you could fill it, and there would still be no harm other than not having space to do the same again.

 

For backing up data drives are essentially buckets that can be filled.  I do try to keep my external drives defragmented, though, and particularly the big ones, as over time if they're frequently used they do become fragmented and can get a bit on the sluggish side.


Brian AKA Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

 

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