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Windows Defender takes 6 hours to full scan comparing to Avast Free 1.5 hours


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#1 j2ee

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 12:33 PM

I used to use Avast Free and full scan took me around 1.5 hours. For the same computer same files, I recently switched to Windows Defender and it takes 6 hours to full scan. The computer is running with windows 10 pro 64 bits. I have 3 harddisk with around 3TB of data. Is this normal?



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#2 quietman7

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 02:55 PM


It is not uncommon for some security scans to take many hours while others finish quickly.

The speed and ability to complete an anti-virus or anti-malware scan depends on a variety of factors.
  • The program itself and how its scanning engine is designed to scan: using a signature database vs heuristic scanning or a combination of both...see How an Anti-virus Program Works.
  • Options to scan for rootkits, adware, riskware and potentially unwanted programs (PUPS).
  • Options to scan memory, boot sectors, registry and alternate data streams (ADS).
  • Type of scan performed: Deep, Quick or Custom scanning.
  • What action has to be performed when malware is detected.
  • A computer's hard drive size.
  • Disk size and used capacity (number of files that have to be scanned).
  • Types of files (.exe, .dll, .sys, .cab, archived, compressed, packed, email, etc) that are scanned.
  • Whether external drives are included in the scan.
  • Competition for and utilization of system/CPU resources by the scanner.
  • Other running processes and programs in the background.
  • Whether the scanning engine stalls, hangs or freezes.
  • Interference from malware.
  • Interference from other security programs attempting to scan at the same time.
  • Interference from other programs attempting to update (download/install) components from the Internet.
  • Interference from the user (whether or not you use the computer during the scan).
In most cases when performing routine security checks, only a Quick Scan is needed since it checks the areas of your computer most likely to contain malware...the most prevalent and common places where malware typically hides. A Full Scan is much more comprehensive and can take a long time since it checks the entire hard drive (all folders/files) which can number in the thousands. The length of time for performing this type of scan varies because it is so comprehensive and therefore can take several hours. As such, a Full scan is generally recommended only for heavily infected systems...showing obvious indications (signs of infection and malware symptoms) that something is wrong.

To speed up a scan, clean out temporary (junk) files first, temporarily disable any other real-time protection tools, close all open programs, perform a Quick Scan instead of a Full one and do not use the computer during the scan. You can also speed up a scan by using file exclusions...What Files Should You Exclude?.
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#3 j2ee

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 11:51 AM

It is not uncommon for some security scans to take many hours while others finish quickly.

The speed and ability to complete an anti-virus or anti-malware scan depends on a variety of factors.

  • The program itself and how its scanning engine is designed to scan: using a signature database vs heuristic scanning or a combination of both...see How an Anti-virus Program Works.
  • Options to scan for rootkits, adware, riskware and potentially unwanted programs (PUPS).
  • Options to scan memory, boot sectors, registry and alternate data streams (ADS).
  • Type of scan performed: Deep, Quick or Custom scanning.
  • What action has to be performed when malware is detected.
  • A computer's hard drive size.
  • Disk size and used capacity (number of files that have to be scanned).
  • Types of files (.exe, .dll, .sys, .cab, archived, compressed, packed, email, etc) that are scanned.
  • Whether external drives are included in the scan.
  • Competition for and utilization of system/CPU resources by the scanner.
  • Other running processes and programs in the background.
  • Whether the scanning engine stalls, hangs or freezes.
  • Interference from malware.
  • Interference from other security programs attempting to scan at the same time.
  • Interference from other programs attempting to update (download/install) components from the Internet.
  • Interference from the user (whether or not you use the computer during the scan).
In most cases when performing routine security checks, only a Quick Scan is needed since it checks the areas of your computer most likely to contain malware...the most prevalent and common places where malware typically hides. A Full Scan is much more comprehensive and can take a long time since it checks the entire hard drive (all folders/files) which can number in the thousands. The length of time for performing this type of scan varies because it is so comprehensive and therefore can take several hours. As such, a Full scan is generally recommended only for heavily infected systems...showing obvious indications (signs of infection and malware symptoms) that something is wrong.

To speed up a scan, clean out temporary (junk) files first, temporarily disable any other real-time protection tools, close all open programs, perform a Quick Scan instead of a Full one and do not use the computer during the scan. You can also speed up a scan by using file exclusions...What Files Should You Exclude?.

 

 

OK so you mean it is normal for Defender to take that long....then Defender has a very weak part....



#4 quietman7

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 02:16 PM

With 3TB of data plus whatever amount of OS and program files on the system...I wouldn't say 6 hrs is not normal for a Full Scan. Again only a Quick Scan is needed for routine scanning.
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#5 MDD1963

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 08:48 PM

3 hard disks with 3 TB each, or 3 each 1 TB discs?

 

Full scans of 5400 rpm 3TB drives can indeed take a while....

 

Defender itself on WIn10 seems rather snappy on fast storage with a relatively fast CPU, as the default quick scan of my half full 500 GB 960 EVO takes 1.2 minutes...; if I recall correctly, my Samsung 850 EVO took 20-30 minutes for Defender quick scan...; i could easily see a conventional drive taking hours for a full scan...

 

Some scanners by default also skip files of larger than "X" MB, so, scans can be much quicker, but, skipping a large amount of files is hardly optimal *IF* one of them is hostile...


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#6 j2ee

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 01:45 PM

3 hard disks with 3 TB each, or 3 each 1 TB discs?

 

Full scans of 5400 rpm 3TB drives can indeed take a while....

 

Defender itself on WIn10 seems rather snappy on fast storage with a relatively fast CPU, as the default quick scan of my half full 500 GB 960 EVO takes 1.2 minutes...; if I recall correctly, my Samsung 850 EVO took 20-30 minutes for Defender quick scan...; i could easily see a conventional drive taking hours for a full scan...

 

Some scanners by default also skip files of larger than "X" MB, so, scans can be much quicker, but, skipping a large amount of files is hardly optimal *IF* one of them is hostile...

 

3 HDD

4TB, 1TB, and 500TB



#7 jwoods301

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 01:54 PM

I used to use Avast Free and full scan took me around 1.5 hours. For the same computer same files, I recently switched to Windows Defender and it takes 6 hours to full scan. The computer is running with windows 10 pro 64 bits. I have 3 harddisk with around 3TB of data. Is this normal?

It could if you have a lot of junk files accumulated, have disk errors, or the drives are highly fragmented.

 

I would run Disk Cleanup, then run chkdsk /r, and finally, if they are not SSD's, defrag the drives.

 

Note: Defragging a drive with disk errors can cause corruption.


Edited by jwoods301, 14 July 2017 - 01:55 PM.


#8 quietman7

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 02:21 PM

3 HDD
4TB, 1TB, and 500TB

That's more than you originally stated so I am not surprised at how long the scan took based on the reasons I already noted. As I already stated, there is no reason for performing a Full Scan unless your system is infected...a Quick Scan takes much less time to complete.
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