Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Overheating Problems


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 SmokeViper07

SmokeViper07

  • Members
  • 173 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:36 AM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 11:06 AM

I have been having several overheating issues and need advice. My system specs are below:

 

Processor: AMD FX-8320 3.5 GHz

Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760

Memory: Crucial 24 GB DDR3

Motherboard: Gigabyte 990FXA-UD5

Storage: Samsung SSD 850 EVO 500 GB

Western Digital Black 1TB 7200 rpm

4x Seagate Hybrid 4TB 7200 rpm

 

During rest my PC has been at around 32-40 Celsius for CPU and around 29-35 for GPU. When starting a game this skyrockets to 70-80 Celsius for CPU. 

 

I have been considering upgrading entirely but it isn't in the budget right now. I am still using the stock CPU heatsink and I don't overclock.

 

Should I just try going liquid cooling such as the Corsair H110i or even just a better CPU heatsink or should I wait, save up, and upgrade the entire system?



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 8,644 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:11:36 AM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 11:26 AM

Have you cleaned out all the dust from your system and checked that the fans are actually working?   If not, that's step one.

 

Are you noticing any misbehavior in the system?   If not, that's a good thing and there's less to worry about.  Is that temperature spike being maintained during gaming?  If you get a quick spike that settles down to under 61.1° C I also wouldn't worry.

 

I cannot seem to locate the spec sheet that would give the throttling temperature, which you'd really have to worry about if you're coming close to it, but you'd typically notice system performance issues if you were.  There is often a very wide gap between maximum normal operating temperature "for cruising" and the critical temperature where throttling comes into the picture because brief spikes can occur.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 SmokeViper07

SmokeViper07
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 173 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:36 AM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 12:11 PM

Have you cleaned out all the dust from your system and checked that the fans are actually working?   If not, that's step one.

 

Are you noticing any misbehavior in the system?   If not, that's a good thing and there's less to worry about.  Is that temperature spike being maintained during gaming?  If you get a quick spike that settles down to under 61.1° C I also wouldn't worry.

 

I cannot seem to locate the spec sheet that would give the throttling temperature, which you'd really have to worry about if you're coming close to it, but you'd typically notice system performance issues if you were.  There is often a very wide gap between maximum normal operating temperature "for cruising" and the critical temperature where throttling comes into the picture because brief spikes can occur.

Thanks for the quick reply.

 

I haven't really gone indepth with cleaning the dust as I don't have anymore compressed air cans but I was able to get a decent amount out of it.

 

The temperature spike is maintained during gaming. It constantly stays around 70 celsius.

 

Outside of this my PC runs fine and decent temperatures.



#4 mikey11

mikey11

  • Members
  • 1,488 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Psychiatric Ward @ Beelitz-Heilstatten Hospital, Beelitz, Germany
  • Local time:05:36 PM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 12:15 PM

remove fan from cpu heatsink....remove heatsink

 

clean dust and debris from both fan and heatsink

 

clean thermal paste from heat sink and cpu mating surfaces

 

apply new thermal paste

 

install heat sink

 

install fan

 

repeat the same procedure for your video card

 

done


Edited by mikey11, 09 July 2017 - 12:15 PM.


#5 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,690 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:08:36 AM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 01:21 PM

@mikey11

 

That is the type of suggestion one makes when they have tried everything else without success.  The OP isn't anywhere near this drastic step.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#6 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 8,644 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:11:36 AM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 01:25 PM

@dc3:  Yep.  I have never understood doing what mikey11 has proposed except as a last resort.  A thorough cleaning usually suffices, but occasionally not.

 

If you don't have canned air to blow it out there's nothing wrong with using the crevice attachment on your vacuum cleaner to suck it out provided you use your finger to keep the fans from spinning madly (which I've never seen hurt them when it's occurred, actually, but . . .).  You do want to avoid any metal contact so do use the crevice tool to prevent that as well as static issues.


Edited by britechguy, 09 July 2017 - 01:26 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#7 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,690 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:08:36 AM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 01:41 PM

@SmokeViper07

 

Brian's suggestion to do some cleaning inside the case is the first thing you need to do.  I don't know where you are physically located, but where I live we have had temperatures in the upper 90s F.  These types of temperatures and a little dust in a strategic location can cause heating issue.  I would also look for dust in and around the intake and exhaust fans in the case, these often neglected.  When you blow out the CPU and the heatsink assembly you should place a pencil through the blades of the fan to keep it from spinning.  I would eve go so far as to use Q-tips to clean out the heatsink.

 

The GPU has a maximum temperature of 97C.  You have not provided any temperatures for this.  

 

The CPU has a maximum temperature of 62C and will start throttling at 70C.  You are encroaching on the maximum temperature for this CPU.

 

What are you using to determine these temperatures?

 

Just to get an idea of what is going on here please download and run  CPUID's HWMonitorand post the temperatures and voltages seen there.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#8 Drillingmachine

Drillingmachine

  • Members
  • 2,440 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:06:36 PM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 01:57 PM

I have been considering upgrading entirely but it isn't in the budget right now. I am still using the stock CPU heatsink and I don't overclock.


Stock cooler sucks. Buy better one. Even $30 class coolers are much better.

Edited by Drillingmachine, 09 July 2017 - 01:58 PM.


#9 mikey11

mikey11

  • Members
  • 1,488 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Psychiatric Ward @ Beelitz-Heilstatten Hospital, Beelitz, Germany
  • Local time:05:36 PM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 02:04 PM

@mikey11

 

That is the type of suggestion one makes when they have tried everything else without success.  The OP isn't anywhere near this drastic step.

 

 

my suggestion may be a bit overkill, but it will fix the problem PROPERLY,

 

taking a vaccuum to it is a band aid fix,

 

do it right the first time,


Edited by mikey11, 09 July 2017 - 02:04 PM.


#10 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,690 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:08:36 AM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 02:10 PM

An aside regarding the use of vacuum cleaners.

 

Vacuum cleaners are great electrostatic generators.  The dust particles sliding along the metal or plastic tubing of the device creates static electricity.  There are vacuum cleaners that are designed especially for this type of application.  If you are going to be using a conventional vacuum cleaner you need to keep the nozzle far enough away from the components inside a computer so that there is no discharge to these components.  All it takes to kill integrated circuits, such as the chips on RAM modules, is around 10 Volts.  Let me put this into perspective.  We all have walked across a carpet and reach for a door knob only to be shocked by a electrostatic discharge which actually hurt.  The amount of voltage to reach that pain threshold is right at 2,000 Volts. :blink:


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#11 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,690 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:08:36 AM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 02:16 PM

@mikey11

 

First off, the CPU in question runs hot to begin with.  Cleaning the heatsink and heatspreader and reapplying the thermal compound is simply putting a band-aide on the problem.  Drillingmachine's suggestion actually holds a lot more merit.  He is correct, the heatsinks that came with these processors were very cheap to start with.  Upgrading will have a greater effect at reducing the temperature of the CPU than anything else if there aren't any extenuating circumstances, like a buildup of dust in the heatsink and fan.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#12 SmokeViper07

SmokeViper07
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 173 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:11:36 AM

Posted 12 July 2017 - 05:19 PM

@SmokeViper07

 

Brian's suggestion to do some cleaning inside the case is the first thing you need to do.  I don't know where you are physically located, but where I live we have had temperatures in the upper 90s F.  These types of temperatures and a little dust in a strategic location can cause heating issue.  I would also look for dust in and around the intake and exhaust fans in the case, these often neglected.  When you blow out the CPU and the heatsink assembly you should place a pencil through the blades of the fan to keep it from spinning.  I would eve go so far as to use Q-tips to clean out the heatsink.

 

The GPU has a maximum temperature of 97C.  You have not provided any temperatures for this.  

 

The CPU has a maximum temperature of 62C and will start throttling at 70C.  You are encroaching on the maximum temperature for this CPU.

 

What are you using to determine these temperatures?

 

Just to get an idea of what is going on here please download and run  CPUID's HWMonitorand post the temperatures and voltages seen there.

 

Thank you dc3 for the informed suggestions. I am currently using CAM software from NZXT to monitor temperatures. I didn't mention the GPU temperatures because they were nowhere near the CPU temps to even strike concern with me. They tend to say under 50C.

 

I am going to the store tomorrow and will pick up some compressed air cans and do a thorough cleaning of my PC and fans. I have stopped gaming on the PC for the meantime.

 

Also, on a sale, I ordered the Corsair H100i v2 liquid cooling system for my CPU and it will be here Friday. It was in the plans regardless if it helps resolve the problem.

 

I live in the countryside of Florida so I get lots of dust, heat, and humidity down here which is a constant battle for me as well as I have 2 German Shepherds (or better fitting, German Shedders) that are also part of the heat problem.

 

I am also looking into upgrading my GPU to this card: https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487266

 

It should be a nice investment for my gaming as well as the added liquid cooler should also help keep it cool as well.

 

Would it be wise to also invest in some nicer fans for the two liquid cooling systems and some aftermarket thermal compound? If so, any suggestions?

 

Thus far, my CPU has been a champ in performance until now should that be on my radar at all to upgrade in the future?

 

Thanks again!



#13 Drillingmachine

Drillingmachine

  • Members
  • 2,440 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:06:36 PM

Posted 13 July 2017 - 05:19 AM

That GPU is bit overkill for CPU tbh and also very expensive. Also GPU prices are so high now that it's better to wait for some time until this cryptocurrency boom goes out.

Is suggest you put some extra fan cooling on case (if you already don't have it) as water coolers generally do not cool motherboard well.

#14 Mike_Walsh

Mike_Walsh

    Bleepin' 'Puppy' nut..!!


  • Members
  • 1,390 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:King's Lynn, UK
  • Local time:04:36 PM

Posted 13 July 2017 - 04:38 PM

I gotta confess, the stock cooler for the FX-8320:-

 

0xN0kUX.jpg

 

...really doesn't look very different to the one that came with my Athlon64 X2 dual-core:-

 

RLueVHN.jpg

 

...and those things are pushing 13 years old at this point in time.

 

Or does it just go to show their heatsink design was pretty good to start with..? 

 

(*shrug*)

 

Wouldn't like to say. Certainly, the 8320 hogs a darn sight more juice through than mine does.....

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Distros:- Multiple 'Puppies'..... and Anti-X 16.1

My Puppy BLOG ~~~  My Puppy PACKAGES

Compaq Presario SR1916UK; Athlon64 X2 3800+, 3 GB RAM, WD 500GB Caviar 'Blue', 32GB Kingspec PATA SSD, 3 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, ATI Radeon Xpress 200 graphics, Dell 15.1" pNp monitor (1024 x 768), TP-Link PCI-e USB 3.0 card, Logitech c920 HD Pro webcam, self-powered 7-port USB 2.0 hub

Dell Inspiron 1100; 2.6 GHz 400FSB P4, 1.5 GB RAM, 64GB KingSpec IDE SSD, Intel 'Extreme' graphics, 1 TB Seagate 'Expansion' external HDD, M$ HD-3000 'Lifecam'.

 

KXhaWqy.gifFQ8nrJ3.gif

 

 


#15 mikey11

mikey11

  • Members
  • 1,488 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Psychiatric Ward @ Beelitz-Heilstatten Hospital, Beelitz, Germany
  • Local time:05:36 PM

Posted 13 July 2017 - 05:08 PM

@mikey11

 

First off, the CPU in question runs hot to begin with.  Cleaning the heatsink and heatspreader and reapplying the thermal compound is simply putting a band-aide on the problem

 

 

i dont believe that one bit






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users